Mas de Agrunelles Nicot 2020 - syrah, grenache

$42.00
Sale price

Regular price $42.00

Aromas of spicy framboise, cassis and black berries. Low to medium tannin with well integrated acid. The Syrah really shines and gives this lighter wine some real depth of flavour.

Syrah grapes are fully de-stemmed while Grenache is kept whole bunch. Grapes are placed in hermetically sealed vats and it only takes a few hours for fermentation to start. Pumping over is made with no exposure to air, and aerations are only carried out to reduce tannin. Maceration lasts for a month. Fermentation takes place in concrete vats. Unfined / unfiltered. Low SO2 added: 2g/hectolitre.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Mas de Agrunelles

Frédéric Porro was an aspiring Motorcross rider until an accident left him in a wheelchair. His disability led him to a new passion - wine - after his sister asked him to put together the wine list for he restaurant. From that moment on, he became devoted to the grape. Mas des Agrunelles came about from his collaboration with Stéphanie Ponson – owner of Mas Nicot – in 2005 near Murles in Languedoc. Stéphanie et Frédéric met in 1999 while studying enology in Montpellier. The name of the estate comes from the fact that there are a lot of wild sloe trees around the vineyards and sloe is ‘Agrunelles’ in old Occitan.

The couple make wine with the same diligence and passion as other biodynamic winemakers have before them, such as Didier Barral and Olivier Julien. It all began with experimentation, trial and error- but they quickly moved from organic vines to a fully functioning biodynamic vineyard and winery. They are proud to produce natural wines of high quality.


 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Rhone Red Blend

The Rhone Red Blend is often known as the GSM blend whereby the three main grapes are Grenache, Syrah and Mouvedre. In actuality there can be up to 13 grapes made into this blend, by law, in the southern Rhone Valley. You can have lighter and more floral versions of the Rhone Red Blend or have bolder and oakier versions depending where in the world it is made. They are most popular in France, California and Australia.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Languedoc-Roussillon

Languedoc-Roussillon is the large wine region that covers the entire south of France. It is home to many different styles of wines, types of grapes and producers. It is often seen as the hub of interesting and exciting wines as well as a bed of cheaper/great value wines.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

Aromas of spicy framboise, cassis and black berries. Low to medium tannin with well integrated acid. The Syrah really shines and gives this lighter wine some real depth of flavour.

Syrah grapes are fully de-stemmed while Grenache is kept whole bunch. Grapes are placed in hermetically sealed vats and it only takes a few hours for fermentation to start. Pumping over is made with no exposure to air, and aerations are only carried out to reduce tannin. Maceration lasts for a month. Fermentation takes place in concrete vats. Unfined / unfiltered. Low SO2 added: 2g/hectolitre.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Mas de Agrunelles

Frédéric Porro was an aspiring Motorcross rider until an accident left him in a wheelchair. His disability led him to a new passion - wine - after his sister asked him to put together the wine list for he restaurant. From that moment on, he became devoted to the grape. Mas des Agrunelles came about from his collaboration with Stéphanie Ponson – owner of Mas Nicot – in 2005 near Murles in Languedoc. Stéphanie et Frédéric met in 1999 while studying enology in Montpellier. The name of the estate comes from the fact that there are a lot of wild sloe trees around the vineyards and sloe is ‘Agrunelles’ in old Occitan.

The couple make wine with the same diligence and passion as other biodynamic winemakers have before them, such as Didier Barral and Olivier Julien. It all began with experimentation, trial and error- but they quickly moved from organic vines to a fully functioning biodynamic vineyard and winery. They are proud to produce natural wines of high quality.


 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Rhone Red Blend

The Rhone Red Blend is often known as the GSM blend whereby the three main grapes are Grenache, Syrah and Mouvedre. In actuality there can be up to 13 grapes made into this blend, by law, in the southern Rhone Valley. You can have lighter and more floral versions of the Rhone Red Blend or have bolder and oakier versions depending where in the world it is made. They are most popular in France, California and Australia.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Languedoc-Roussillon

Languedoc-Roussillon is the large wine region that covers the entire south of France. It is home to many different styles of wines, types of grapes and producers. It is often seen as the hub of interesting and exciting wines as well as a bed of cheaper/great value wines.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.