Two Hands 'Holy Grail' Shiraz 2019

$145.00
Sale price

Regular price $145.00

The Holy Grail Shiraz comes from our Estate Single Vineyard in the sub-region of Seppeltsfield, in the Barossa Valley.

The first part of this site was purchased in 2008 and included 52 acres of vacant land. The vision was to wait until resources permitted and plant this Ares of land as specifically as possible. Just before the 2015 vintage a further 37 acres of land were purchased, which included 16 acres of established Shiraz vines. This vineyard produced 27 tonnes in its first vintage, with fruit going into My Hands, Ares, Single Vineyard and a few barrels to Bella’s garden.

SUB-REGION: Seppeltsfield
VINE AGE: 17 years
ALTITUDE: 250m
AVERAGE RAINFALL: 450-500mm
SOIL TYPE: Predominantly rich red/brown clay.

  • TECHNICAL INFORMATION

     

    Closure Type Cork
    Volume (ml) 750ml
    Varietal Shiraz
    Region Barossa Valley
    Alcohol (% vol.) 14.5%

     

    The Producer

    The idea for Two Hands was born in September 1999 when founders Michael Twelftree and Richard Mintz sat at a friend’s engagement party and decided it was time to make their own wine and market it on the world stage.

    The original aim was, and still is, to make the best possible Shiraz-based wines from prized growing regions throughout Australia.  With so much Australian wine being sold around the globe under multi-region labels in a formulaic style, the intention was to break the mould and showcase the diversity of Australian Shiraz by highlighting regional and vineyard characteristics by allowing the fruit to be the primary feature of the wines.

    Two Hands’ first vintage was in 2000, after a modest $30k investment and starting with just 17 tonnes of fruit.  The journey had started.

    Michael’s wine contacts in the US and UK helped launch the brand and favourable critical reaction put Two Hands in the spotlight soon after. The early success helped Two Hands gradually increase production and venture out to launch the full Garden Series with the 2003 vintage, something truly unique in Australia.   Gnarly Dudes joined its stablemate Angels’ Share in the Picture Series, and the portfolio was starting to take shape.  Later that year, Michael was driving down a dusty track in the Western Ranges of the Barossa Valley and first saw the run down uninhabited cottage next to the Marananga Creek that was to become the home of Two Hands – Kraehe House.   Michael’s vision was to reflect the Barossa heritage with the sandstone frontage and verandah, but create something modern and luxurious on the inside: the Cellar Door and Bakehouse opened in December 2003 just in time for Christmas and turned local hospitality on its head – anyone could walk in and taste Flagship Shiraz Ares, no matter where they were from or if they had money to spend.

    Winemaking for me is a labour of love, a passion, and a craft. I have walked every vineyard, made every picking decision and tasted every individual barrel of each wine we’ve ever produced. I can’t imagine there are too many winery owners around the world that take the pursuit of quality that personally.
    MICHAEL TWELFTREE

    By the end of 2004 a state-of-the-art winery was built on the same site, specifically designed for small batch handling. To maximise the individual regional and varietal characteristics and to allow for greater quality control, every parcel of fruit, no matter how small, could be handled separately from crushing through to fermentation and oak maturation.  The new winery revolutionised the winemaking capabilities and experimentation flourished, new varietals were tested, new techniques adopted, with a Cellar Door as a perfect outlet for some of the trials to test the market.  As production increased, more varied sources of Shiraz from the Western Ranges in the Barossa were added to the mix and broadened the complexity and palate to choose from.

    The Coach House vineyard at Greenock had already been in the fold from 2002, but the Marananga site also allowed for vineyard to be developed alongside Kraehe House, with 5 acres of Shiraz planted from 2005 for future grape supply as part of the long term goal of growing the estate.  With the regionality of the Garden Series well established, the next logical step was to explore further down to the terroir of individual vineyard sites which had the X-Factor, and the Single Vineyard Series was launched.  The 2005 Zippy’s Block was the first release and its introduction completed the now four-tiered portfolio.

    Numerous accolades continued, including Robert Parker famously naming Two Hands ‘’the finest negociant south of the equator’’, and demand around the world surged in the following years as the wines expanded into export markets throughout Europe, Asia, North America and, of course, Australia.  In November 2012, Two Hands was named in the Wine Spectator’s annual Top 100 for the 10th consecutive year, an achievement without equal by any winery the world over.

    Today, Two Hands is owned by Michael Twelftree, together with Colorado native Tim Hower.  Tim’s love of the Barossa Valley led him to acquire several premium vineyards across the region and brought him into contact with Two Hands, culminating in his investment in February 2015. Since Tim’s involvement, Two Hands has gone on to secure additional estate vineyards, notably the Holy Grail site on Seppeltsfield Road, which is set for further vineyard development in 2016. With Michael and Tim sharing an ambitious vision for the future, Two Hands next chapter in the journey is sure to be exciting.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

The Holy Grail Shiraz comes from our Estate Single Vineyard in the sub-region of Seppeltsfield, in the Barossa Valley.

The first part of this site was purchased in 2008 and included 52 acres of vacant land. The vision was to wait until resources permitted and plant this Ares of land as specifically as possible. Just before the 2015 vintage a further 37 acres of land were purchased, which included 16 acres of established Shiraz vines. This vineyard produced 27 tonnes in its first vintage, with fruit going into My Hands, Ares, Single Vineyard and a few barrels to Bella’s garden.

SUB-REGION: Seppeltsfield
VINE AGE: 17 years
ALTITUDE: 250m
AVERAGE RAINFALL: 450-500mm
SOIL TYPE: Predominantly rich red/brown clay.

  • TECHNICAL INFORMATION

     

    Closure Type Cork
    Volume (ml) 750ml
    Varietal Shiraz
    Region Barossa Valley
    Alcohol (% vol.) 14.5%

     

    The Producer

    The idea for Two Hands was born in September 1999 when founders Michael Twelftree and Richard Mintz sat at a friend’s engagement party and decided it was time to make their own wine and market it on the world stage.

    The original aim was, and still is, to make the best possible Shiraz-based wines from prized growing regions throughout Australia.  With so much Australian wine being sold around the globe under multi-region labels in a formulaic style, the intention was to break the mould and showcase the diversity of Australian Shiraz by highlighting regional and vineyard characteristics by allowing the fruit to be the primary feature of the wines.

    Two Hands’ first vintage was in 2000, after a modest $30k investment and starting with just 17 tonnes of fruit.  The journey had started.

    Michael’s wine contacts in the US and UK helped launch the brand and favourable critical reaction put Two Hands in the spotlight soon after. The early success helped Two Hands gradually increase production and venture out to launch the full Garden Series with the 2003 vintage, something truly unique in Australia.   Gnarly Dudes joined its stablemate Angels’ Share in the Picture Series, and the portfolio was starting to take shape.  Later that year, Michael was driving down a dusty track in the Western Ranges of the Barossa Valley and first saw the run down uninhabited cottage next to the Marananga Creek that was to become the home of Two Hands – Kraehe House.   Michael’s vision was to reflect the Barossa heritage with the sandstone frontage and verandah, but create something modern and luxurious on the inside: the Cellar Door and Bakehouse opened in December 2003 just in time for Christmas and turned local hospitality on its head – anyone could walk in and taste Flagship Shiraz Ares, no matter where they were from or if they had money to spend.

    Winemaking for me is a labour of love, a passion, and a craft. I have walked every vineyard, made every picking decision and tasted every individual barrel of each wine we’ve ever produced. I can’t imagine there are too many winery owners around the world that take the pursuit of quality that personally.
    MICHAEL TWELFTREE

    By the end of 2004 a state-of-the-art winery was built on the same site, specifically designed for small batch handling. To maximise the individual regional and varietal characteristics and to allow for greater quality control, every parcel of fruit, no matter how small, could be handled separately from crushing through to fermentation and oak maturation.  The new winery revolutionised the winemaking capabilities and experimentation flourished, new varietals were tested, new techniques adopted, with a Cellar Door as a perfect outlet for some of the trials to test the market.  As production increased, more varied sources of Shiraz from the Western Ranges in the Barossa were added to the mix and broadened the complexity and palate to choose from.

    The Coach House vineyard at Greenock had already been in the fold from 2002, but the Marananga site also allowed for vineyard to be developed alongside Kraehe House, with 5 acres of Shiraz planted from 2005 for future grape supply as part of the long term goal of growing the estate.  With the regionality of the Garden Series well established, the next logical step was to explore further down to the terroir of individual vineyard sites which had the X-Factor, and the Single Vineyard Series was launched.  The 2005 Zippy’s Block was the first release and its introduction completed the now four-tiered portfolio.

    Numerous accolades continued, including Robert Parker famously naming Two Hands ‘’the finest negociant south of the equator’’, and demand around the world surged in the following years as the wines expanded into export markets throughout Europe, Asia, North America and, of course, Australia.  In November 2012, Two Hands was named in the Wine Spectator’s annual Top 100 for the 10th consecutive year, an achievement without equal by any winery the world over.

    Today, Two Hands is owned by Michael Twelftree, together with Colorado native Tim Hower.  Tim’s love of the Barossa Valley led him to acquire several premium vineyards across the region and brought him into contact with Two Hands, culminating in his investment in February 2015. Since Tim’s involvement, Two Hands has gone on to secure additional estate vineyards, notably the Holy Grail site on Seppeltsfield Road, which is set for further vineyard development in 2016. With Michael and Tim sharing an ambitious vision for the future, Two Hands next chapter in the journey is sure to be exciting.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.