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A. Chauvet Blanc De Blancs NV

$65.00
Sale price

Regular price $65.00

 GRAPE VARIETALS VINE AGE WINEMAKING

TASTING NOTES

The grapes come entirely from two grand cru vineyards on the Montagne de Reims: Bisseuil, which lends finesse; and Verzenay, roundness and structure. The Chauvets own vineyards only in the very best parcels, composed of ancient chalky limestone.

Sustainably farmed for several generations. To treat mildew and oïdium, Arnaud acts immediately and decisively, which means that only miniscule doses are needed. The use of integrated pest management, an insect hormone treatment that the French refer to as confusion sexuelle, curtails the use of pesticides. Arnaud employs de-budding to reduce yields and leaf-pulling to ensure better air circulation between clusters.

100% Chardonnay
35 year-old vines on average

Hand harvested and vinified in the traditional method. 80% of the wines comes from the current harvest, with 20% from reserve wine to ensure consistency in style. Reserve wine is stored in old oak casks, or foudres, which do not impart wood flavors to wine. No malolactic fermentation. Dosage is 4.5 g/L. The wine ages on its lees for 36 months.

Chauvet’s NV Blanc de Blancs is the epitome of the complexity that real champagne lovers look for. Creamy notes of pears and melons jump out of the glass, complemented by the signature chalky mineral notes of its terroir and aromas of freshly baked brioche. Deep, full and well-balanced, each sip is infused with a fresh core of acidity and bright minerals that lingers long on the palate 

The Producer

From their vintage labels to their retro winemaking practices, brothers Jean-François and Arnaud Paillard-Chauvet create champagnes in the old-school, classic style that true connoisseurs love. Recently, Arnaud's son Jacques Paillard-Chauvet has begun taking the reins of the estate, returning home from another life in banking in Paris. Jacques has set out with an aim to preserve the estate, continue the great family tradition, yet also ensure that these incredible wines are not lost to history.

For the Chauvet, harmony in champagne is not just important, it is elemental. As such, they are regional champions of the art of blending Chardonnay and Pinot Noir, and they take an unabashedly classical approach in the vineyards and in the cellars. Farming their family’s 10 hectares sustainably in five of the Montagne de Reims’s 17 grand crus—Bouzy, Ambonnay, Verzy, Verzenay and Bisseuil— one feels a complex synergy to the final wines where the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.

Long fermentations and extended élevages on the lees help develop complexity and fine aromatics, while also radically reducing the need for sulfur and eschewing the need for malolactic fermentations. In the end, their harmony in both their partnership and practice yields elegant, earthy and aromatic champagnes with a fine, satiny mousse that dances across the palate. That they are also capable of long cellar aging is a fitting legacy for a family who has endured since 1848, and whose family home in Tours-sur-Marne features an immaculately preserved salon, dating to the early 1900's.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

 GRAPE VARIETALS VINE AGE WINEMAKING

TASTING NOTES

The grapes come entirely from two grand cru vineyards on the Montagne de Reims: Bisseuil, which lends finesse; and Verzenay, roundness and structure. The Chauvets own vineyards only in the very best parcels, composed of ancient chalky limestone.

Sustainably farmed for several generations. To treat mildew and oïdium, Arnaud acts immediately and decisively, which means that only miniscule doses are needed. The use of integrated pest management, an insect hormone treatment that the French refer to as confusion sexuelle, curtails the use of pesticides. Arnaud employs de-budding to reduce yields and leaf-pulling to ensure better air circulation between clusters.

100% Chardonnay
35 year-old vines on average

Hand harvested and vinified in the traditional method. 80% of the wines comes from the current harvest, with 20% from reserve wine to ensure consistency in style. Reserve wine is stored in old oak casks, or foudres, which do not impart wood flavors to wine. No malolactic fermentation. Dosage is 4.5 g/L. The wine ages on its lees for 36 months.

Chauvet’s NV Blanc de Blancs is the epitome of the complexity that real champagne lovers look for. Creamy notes of pears and melons jump out of the glass, complemented by the signature chalky mineral notes of its terroir and aromas of freshly baked brioche. Deep, full and well-balanced, each sip is infused with a fresh core of acidity and bright minerals that lingers long on the palate 

The Producer

From their vintage labels to their retro winemaking practices, brothers Jean-François and Arnaud Paillard-Chauvet create champagnes in the old-school, classic style that true connoisseurs love. Recently, Arnaud's son Jacques Paillard-Chauvet has begun taking the reins of the estate, returning home from another life in banking in Paris. Jacques has set out with an aim to preserve the estate, continue the great family tradition, yet also ensure that these incredible wines are not lost to history.

For the Chauvet, harmony in champagne is not just important, it is elemental. As such, they are regional champions of the art of blending Chardonnay and Pinot Noir, and they take an unabashedly classical approach in the vineyards and in the cellars. Farming their family’s 10 hectares sustainably in five of the Montagne de Reims’s 17 grand crus—Bouzy, Ambonnay, Verzy, Verzenay and Bisseuil— one feels a complex synergy to the final wines where the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.

Long fermentations and extended élevages on the lees help develop complexity and fine aromatics, while also radically reducing the need for sulfur and eschewing the need for malolactic fermentations. In the end, their harmony in both their partnership and practice yields elegant, earthy and aromatic champagnes with a fine, satiny mousse that dances across the palate. That they are also capable of long cellar aging is a fitting legacy for a family who has endured since 1848, and whose family home in Tours-sur-Marne features an immaculately preserved salon, dating to the early 1900's.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.