Alois Lageder - Lagrein 2014

$42.00
Sale price

Regular price $42.00

Description: Medium garnet colour with ruby hints. Rich, quite pronounced, spicy aroma with a chocolate character, floral impressions (violets), red fruit and prunes. Soft smooth fruit, full-bodied. Firm, dry and somewhat earthy finish.

When stored under proper conditions, this wine will drink well for 6 to 8 years.

Suggested food: red meat such as beef and lamb, venison, game, all kinds of cheese.

Origin: selected vineyards in the Bolzano area and Magrè at an altitude of 230 to 330 metres above sea level.

Deep and sandy, alluvial soils along the Talvera river . Very warm meso-climate.

Age of the vines: 17 - 52 years

Harvested: end of September - begin of October 2014

Vinification: fermentation and malolactic fermentation in stainless steel tanks. Maturation for seventeen months partly in concrete wine storage vessels and partly in small and large oak barrels.

Alcohol: 12.5 % by vol.

Acidity: 5.0 g / litre

Bottled: May 2016

Release: June 2016

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Alois Lageder

IN HARMONY WITH NATURE

The Alois Lageder winery in Alto Adige comprises fifty-five hectares of the family's own vineyards, which are managed on the basis of biodynamic principles. Our holistic approach is reflected in our wine-growing activities, our long-standing relationships with numerous grape growers and our ambition to create awareness for an agriculture that is in tune with nature.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Lagrein

Lagrein is a red grape variety native to the valleys of South Tyrol, Northern Italy.  

Along with Marzemino, it is a descendant of Teroldego, and related to Syrah, Pinot Noir and Dureza.

The name suggests its origins lie in the Lagarina valley of Trentino. It was mentioned as early as in the 17th century, in records of the Muri Abbey near Bolzano.

Lagrein produces wines with high acidity and tannins.


 

--------THE REGION--------

Alto Adige

Alto Adige 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

Description: Medium garnet colour with ruby hints. Rich, quite pronounced, spicy aroma with a chocolate character, floral impressions (violets), red fruit and prunes. Soft smooth fruit, full-bodied. Firm, dry and somewhat earthy finish.

When stored under proper conditions, this wine will drink well for 6 to 8 years.

Suggested food: red meat such as beef and lamb, venison, game, all kinds of cheese.

Origin: selected vineyards in the Bolzano area and Magrè at an altitude of 230 to 330 metres above sea level.

Deep and sandy, alluvial soils along the Talvera river . Very warm meso-climate.

Age of the vines: 17 - 52 years

Harvested: end of September - begin of October 2014

Vinification: fermentation and malolactic fermentation in stainless steel tanks. Maturation for seventeen months partly in concrete wine storage vessels and partly in small and large oak barrels.

Alcohol: 12.5 % by vol.

Acidity: 5.0 g / litre

Bottled: May 2016

Release: June 2016

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Alois Lageder

IN HARMONY WITH NATURE

The Alois Lageder winery in Alto Adige comprises fifty-five hectares of the family's own vineyards, which are managed on the basis of biodynamic principles. Our holistic approach is reflected in our wine-growing activities, our long-standing relationships with numerous grape growers and our ambition to create awareness for an agriculture that is in tune with nature.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Lagrein

Lagrein is a red grape variety native to the valleys of South Tyrol, Northern Italy.  

Along with Marzemino, it is a descendant of Teroldego, and related to Syrah, Pinot Noir and Dureza.

The name suggests its origins lie in the Lagarina valley of Trentino. It was mentioned as early as in the 17th century, in records of the Muri Abbey near Bolzano.

Lagrein produces wines with high acidity and tannins.


 

--------THE REGION--------

Alto Adige

Alto Adige 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.