Anselmi - 'San Vincenzo' Garganega/Chardonnay/Sauvignon Blanc 2018/20

$35.00
Sale price

Regular price $35.00

"Light straw color with crisp and pure aromas, with scents of minerals, apple, banana and lemon blossoms. Medium-bodied, dry and fresh, with notes of citrus fruit, pear, grapefruit and hints of hazelnut."

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Anselmi

Roberto Anselmi is widely regarded as one of Italy’s leading white wine producers. He left university in 1975 and started working in his father’s winery. His grandfather had been forced to sell the family’s vineyards in the 1940s and 50s, so his father’s winery relied on bought-in grapes.

Roberto’s ambition was to buy back the family’s vineyards, and he started acquiring hillside vineyards, planted at high density. Currently he has 70 hectares of vines, planted at 6000 vines per hectare and trained to Guyot or permanent cordon, as opposed to the much higher yielding double pergola system common in the region. His clones of Garganega (the white variety of Soave) are the less productive, higher quality ones.

Frustrated by the low quality and general lack of ambition in the Soave region, in 2000 he chose to leave the Soave DOC, and his wines are now labelled as IGT Veneto. ‘Probably the best property in Soave is my property,’ he says, ‘but I don’t like beauracratic logic in my life. No one is focused on the real quality. I use 7000 plants/hectare as opposed to 1200. I have 3 bunches per plant as opposed to 15. These are two different philosophies of life.’ He takes a quality minded approach, starting in the vineyard, and extending to the cellar where he uses cold maceration and low temperature fermentation.

His wines are very impressive in quite a modern, forward style. The San Vicenzo is a favourite of ours: lovely fruit quality unobscured by oak and very good value. Prices for the Foscarino and Capitel Croce are also pretty sane, and the sweet I Capitelli is lovely.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Garganega

Garganega is the white grape varietal behind the zippy and citrusy wines of Soave in the Veneto of northern Italy. It has long been one of the most planted white grapes in Italy due to its bold lemon and lime flavour profile.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Veneto

Veneto is a region in the northeast of Italy. It is the region behind the famous red wines of Valpolicella. The wines of Valpolicella are made in a range of styles from dry and light (Valpolicella Superiore) to medium bodied and complex (Valpolicella Ripasso) to the fullest bodied red (Amarone della Valpolicella) and a sweet red made in a passito style (Recioto della Valpolicella). It is also the home to the sparkling wines of Prosecco.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

"Light straw color with crisp and pure aromas, with scents of minerals, apple, banana and lemon blossoms. Medium-bodied, dry and fresh, with notes of citrus fruit, pear, grapefruit and hints of hazelnut."

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Anselmi

Roberto Anselmi is widely regarded as one of Italy’s leading white wine producers. He left university in 1975 and started working in his father’s winery. His grandfather had been forced to sell the family’s vineyards in the 1940s and 50s, so his father’s winery relied on bought-in grapes.

Roberto’s ambition was to buy back the family’s vineyards, and he started acquiring hillside vineyards, planted at high density. Currently he has 70 hectares of vines, planted at 6000 vines per hectare and trained to Guyot or permanent cordon, as opposed to the much higher yielding double pergola system common in the region. His clones of Garganega (the white variety of Soave) are the less productive, higher quality ones.

Frustrated by the low quality and general lack of ambition in the Soave region, in 2000 he chose to leave the Soave DOC, and his wines are now labelled as IGT Veneto. ‘Probably the best property in Soave is my property,’ he says, ‘but I don’t like beauracratic logic in my life. No one is focused on the real quality. I use 7000 plants/hectare as opposed to 1200. I have 3 bunches per plant as opposed to 15. These are two different philosophies of life.’ He takes a quality minded approach, starting in the vineyard, and extending to the cellar where he uses cold maceration and low temperature fermentation.

His wines are very impressive in quite a modern, forward style. The San Vicenzo is a favourite of ours: lovely fruit quality unobscured by oak and very good value. Prices for the Foscarino and Capitel Croce are also pretty sane, and the sweet I Capitelli is lovely.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Garganega

Garganega is the white grape varietal behind the zippy and citrusy wines of Soave in the Veneto of northern Italy. It has long been one of the most planted white grapes in Italy due to its bold lemon and lime flavour profile.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Veneto

Veneto is a region in the northeast of Italy. It is the region behind the famous red wines of Valpolicella. The wines of Valpolicella are made in a range of styles from dry and light (Valpolicella Superiore) to medium bodied and complex (Valpolicella Ripasso) to the fullest bodied red (Amarone della Valpolicella) and a sweet red made in a passito style (Recioto della Valpolicella). It is also the home to the sparkling wines of Prosecco.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.