Antonio Madeira Dao A Palheira 2017

$100.00
Sale price

Regular price $100.00

Region : Dão – Serra da Estrela
Soil type: Granite
Vineyards : 2 old vineyards
Average vine age : 60 and 100 years old
Grape varieties: Field blend of 20 native grape varieties, where the main is Baga.

Winemaking:
The vinification philosophy was to respect the grapes and nature and focus on seeking the expression of the terroir of Serra da Estrela, thus, no other product was used except sulphur.Alcoholic fermentation took place in open vats with traditional treading and began naturally, with the yeast from the vine itself, to express its identity in the purest form.Very little extraction was sought. After pressing, the wine was placed directly into used French oak barrels, where malolactic fermentation took place until the following spring and where it aged for 18 months. Bottling took place in July 2015.

 Grape Varieties:
Jaen,Tinta Amarela,Baga

Tasting Notes:
Still very young, full of energy, showing ability to age in bottle. Great finesse, flowers, crystal fruit, resins and minerals combine in a pure nose, unique and complex. Mouth salivating, dense and elegant, very fresh, full of energy, demanding food around. Long finish and granitic.

Store and Serve Advices:
Storage Lying down at a temperature of 15°C. Serve at a temperature of 16°C to 18ºC.

Food Pairing:
Accompanies grilled meats, pasta with red sauce, cold and powerful cheeses.

The Producer

ANTONIO MADEIRA

Dão

António Madeira is French of Portuguese descent, and his family roots are in the Serra da Estrela, Portugal’s highest mountain range located in the upper Dão region. António believes the heart of Dão lies in this mountainous region, and that the fine, fresh, mineral wines you can produce here - which he refers to as the ‘Grands Crus of the Dão highlands’ - have great ageing potential. He started researching the region in earnest in 2010, and discovered plots of old vines of native varietals such as Tinta Pinheira, Negro Mouro, Tinta Amarela and Baga. This viticultural heritage, combined with the free draining granite soils and excellent sun exposures make these sites distinct. He found a neglected 50-year-old vineyard in Serra da Estrela foothills, which he recuperated and used to produce his first wine in 2011. His winemaking philosophy is to respect the grapes and the natural environment. He farms sustainably, just using some sulphur treatments, in order to not mask the unique terroir. Grapes are hand harvested and winemaking is gentle, aiming for minimal extraction.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

Region : Dão – Serra da Estrela
Soil type: Granite
Vineyards : 2 old vineyards
Average vine age : 60 and 100 years old
Grape varieties: Field blend of 20 native grape varieties, where the main is Baga.

Winemaking:
The vinification philosophy was to respect the grapes and nature and focus on seeking the expression of the terroir of Serra da Estrela, thus, no other product was used except sulphur.Alcoholic fermentation took place in open vats with traditional treading and began naturally, with the yeast from the vine itself, to express its identity in the purest form.Very little extraction was sought. After pressing, the wine was placed directly into used French oak barrels, where malolactic fermentation took place until the following spring and where it aged for 18 months. Bottling took place in July 2015.

 Grape Varieties:
Jaen,Tinta Amarela,Baga

Tasting Notes:
Still very young, full of energy, showing ability to age in bottle. Great finesse, flowers, crystal fruit, resins and minerals combine in a pure nose, unique and complex. Mouth salivating, dense and elegant, very fresh, full of energy, demanding food around. Long finish and granitic.

Store and Serve Advices:
Storage Lying down at a temperature of 15°C. Serve at a temperature of 16°C to 18ºC.

Food Pairing:
Accompanies grilled meats, pasta with red sauce, cold and powerful cheeses.

The Producer

ANTONIO MADEIRA

Dão

António Madeira is French of Portuguese descent, and his family roots are in the Serra da Estrela, Portugal’s highest mountain range located in the upper Dão region. António believes the heart of Dão lies in this mountainous region, and that the fine, fresh, mineral wines you can produce here - which he refers to as the ‘Grands Crus of the Dão highlands’ - have great ageing potential. He started researching the region in earnest in 2010, and discovered plots of old vines of native varietals such as Tinta Pinheira, Negro Mouro, Tinta Amarela and Baga. This viticultural heritage, combined with the free draining granite soils and excellent sun exposures make these sites distinct. He found a neglected 50-year-old vineyard in Serra da Estrela foothills, which he recuperated and used to produce his first wine in 2011. His winemaking philosophy is to respect the grapes and the natural environment. He farms sustainably, just using some sulphur treatments, in order to not mask the unique terroir. Grapes are hand harvested and winemaking is gentle, aiming for minimal extraction.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.