Bodegas Godelia - Mencia 2016

$38.00
Sale price

Regular price $38.00

"Perfect expression of Mencía from Bierzo. This vintage is characterised by a great fruit concentration. We can find a lot of nuances, red fruit, violets and mineral notes, which are assembled with the nuances provided by the oak ageing. The palate is fresh, meaty and elegant with a great finish."

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Bodegas Godelia

Bodegas Godelia is located in El Bierzo, a unique landscape and exceptional environment for winemaking. Located in the northwest of Spain, El Bierzo is a region surrounded by mountains that forms a large valley cut through by the Sil River, with a wide array of soils and orientations in its vineyards. The richness of the soil, combined with the age of the vineyard, makes it a unique place to produce high quality wines.

Right on the Camino de Santiago, the winery is located on your route through El Bierzo. Literally. The French Way of Saint James goes past our front door. It is the exact point where the countdown to the last 200 km begins and the pilgrim’s final stage before arriving in Galicia. At the winery we are delighted to accompany you on this journey. This is not by chance, since El Camino brought with it a legacy to which the winery wants to pay tribute. This special location in El Bierzo has given the winery the self-satisfaction of carefully growing the native grape varieties: Mencía, Godello, and Doña Blanca. Our aim is always to transmit terroir, sensitivity, and elegance in our wines.

Godelia’s great virtue lies in the fact that it was born as a passion at the end of 2009. It is a love for nature that led the García Rodríguez family, the founders of the winery, to give an outlet to their enthusiasm for viticulture in El Bierzo. It is a dream come true, a winery in El Bierzo that creates value and a future for the region, a legacy through its wines. It’s about not being satisfied until you create a masterpiece, with a healthy amount of excitement, dedication, and effort. All this, to achieve excellence.


--------THE GRAPE--------

Mencia

Mencia is a red grape varietal that is bold and powerful. It is the star of the region of Bierzo in Spain but can also be found across Portugal's vineyards. It gives wines that are fruit-forward and easy to enjoy with lively aromatics filled with red fruit flavours.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Bierzo

Bierzo is in the northeast of Spain. It has is quite a young wine producing region, as far as Spain is concerned, only gaining legal appellation status in 1989. It is a region that is neither too cool or too hot, like the most of Spain, and produces mainly red wines. These red wines are made from the Mencia grape variety which is similar to Cabernet Franc.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

"Perfect expression of Mencía from Bierzo. This vintage is characterised by a great fruit concentration. We can find a lot of nuances, red fruit, violets and mineral notes, which are assembled with the nuances provided by the oak ageing. The palate is fresh, meaty and elegant with a great finish."

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Bodegas Godelia

Bodegas Godelia is located in El Bierzo, a unique landscape and exceptional environment for winemaking. Located in the northwest of Spain, El Bierzo is a region surrounded by mountains that forms a large valley cut through by the Sil River, with a wide array of soils and orientations in its vineyards. The richness of the soil, combined with the age of the vineyard, makes it a unique place to produce high quality wines.

Right on the Camino de Santiago, the winery is located on your route through El Bierzo. Literally. The French Way of Saint James goes past our front door. It is the exact point where the countdown to the last 200 km begins and the pilgrim’s final stage before arriving in Galicia. At the winery we are delighted to accompany you on this journey. This is not by chance, since El Camino brought with it a legacy to which the winery wants to pay tribute. This special location in El Bierzo has given the winery the self-satisfaction of carefully growing the native grape varieties: Mencía, Godello, and Doña Blanca. Our aim is always to transmit terroir, sensitivity, and elegance in our wines.

Godelia’s great virtue lies in the fact that it was born as a passion at the end of 2009. It is a love for nature that led the García Rodríguez family, the founders of the winery, to give an outlet to their enthusiasm for viticulture in El Bierzo. It is a dream come true, a winery in El Bierzo that creates value and a future for the region, a legacy through its wines. It’s about not being satisfied until you create a masterpiece, with a healthy amount of excitement, dedication, and effort. All this, to achieve excellence.


--------THE GRAPE--------

Mencia

Mencia is a red grape varietal that is bold and powerful. It is the star of the region of Bierzo in Spain but can also be found across Portugal's vineyards. It gives wines that are fruit-forward and easy to enjoy with lively aromatics filled with red fruit flavours.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Bierzo

Bierzo is in the northeast of Spain. It has is quite a young wine producing region, as far as Spain is concerned, only gaining legal appellation status in 1989. It is a region that is neither too cool or too hot, like the most of Spain, and produces mainly red wines. These red wines are made from the Mencia grape variety which is similar to Cabernet Franc.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.