Chanson Viré - Clessé 2018

$40.00
Sale price

Regular price $40.00

Chanson’s regional wine, Viré Clessé is one of the best white wines of the region, combining suppleness and minerality. The appellation lies in the heart of the Mâcon appellation in the south of Burgundy. The two villages, Viré and Clessé form a unique terroir on south-east facing slopes. In Viré, the soil is chalky with large layers of clay. In Clessé, the soil structure is slightly different, with a combination of chalk and clay mixed with liasic marls combined with oyster-fossils, giving the wine an underlying minerality. It’s produced from a combination of Chardonnay and Chardonnay Muscaté grapes.

The Producer

When history gets involved

“La tour des filles” or “Bastion de l’Oratoire”, currently the property of Domaine Chanson, was built on the old battlements of Beaune, constructed by the first dukes of Burgundy. From the mid 15th century, Philippe le Bon requested that the fortifications be maintained and developed.

Burgundy, under the reign of Charles le Téméraire, last Duke of Burgundy, surpassed the kingdom of France through its surface area and its power. This situation conferred a strategic place upon Beaune, then capital of Burgundy, raising the interest of neighbouring regions.
At the death of Charles le Téméraire, the 29th of January 1477, the states of Burgundy and particularly Beaune join his daughter, Marie de Bourgogne. Indeed, the wealthy people from the town centre and unruly winemakers of the area didn’t want to be reattached to France, and refused to obey Louis XI. However, one year later, after violent repressions, Louis XI took possession of Beaune. From then, Beaune is only a few kilometres from the boarders of a newly expanded Kingdom.

This strategic position commits the King to build and fortify harder the current battlements. Not only to repulse the enemy but also to subdue, just in case, the lovely population of Beaune still disobedient. As a result, “La Tour des Filles” was built between 1519 and 1524.
By then, the growing of vine was already established in the region and fully contributed to the local economy.
Two centuries later, with the development of trade, wines Houses naturally appeared. Under the reign of Louis XI, Simon Verry founded a House of burgundian wines and was allowed by the city to use the “Bastion de l’Oratoire”, clear of weapons and other objects witnessing the military history of the structure, to shelter his wines.
In 1790, the Bastion was at its best since it now shelters over 10 000 bottles of wine.
Its 8-metres thick walls protect wines from sunburn and winter bites. If “La Tour des Filles” owes its existence to the protection of a town and a power, it owes its survival to the protection of wine. A much more dignified vocation to some…

In the middle of the 9th century, while the Empire reached its end, wine trading is in full expansion. Alexis Chanson, then headmaster of the House, built two more levels to the structure which had become too small to welcome all the wines. In 1826, the Bastion reached its final shape.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

Chanson’s regional wine, Viré Clessé is one of the best white wines of the region, combining suppleness and minerality. The appellation lies in the heart of the Mâcon appellation in the south of Burgundy. The two villages, Viré and Clessé form a unique terroir on south-east facing slopes. In Viré, the soil is chalky with large layers of clay. In Clessé, the soil structure is slightly different, with a combination of chalk and clay mixed with liasic marls combined with oyster-fossils, giving the wine an underlying minerality. It’s produced from a combination of Chardonnay and Chardonnay Muscaté grapes.

The Producer

When history gets involved

“La tour des filles” or “Bastion de l’Oratoire”, currently the property of Domaine Chanson, was built on the old battlements of Beaune, constructed by the first dukes of Burgundy. From the mid 15th century, Philippe le Bon requested that the fortifications be maintained and developed.

Burgundy, under the reign of Charles le Téméraire, last Duke of Burgundy, surpassed the kingdom of France through its surface area and its power. This situation conferred a strategic place upon Beaune, then capital of Burgundy, raising the interest of neighbouring regions.
At the death of Charles le Téméraire, the 29th of January 1477, the states of Burgundy and particularly Beaune join his daughter, Marie de Bourgogne. Indeed, the wealthy people from the town centre and unruly winemakers of the area didn’t want to be reattached to France, and refused to obey Louis XI. However, one year later, after violent repressions, Louis XI took possession of Beaune. From then, Beaune is only a few kilometres from the boarders of a newly expanded Kingdom.

This strategic position commits the King to build and fortify harder the current battlements. Not only to repulse the enemy but also to subdue, just in case, the lovely population of Beaune still disobedient. As a result, “La Tour des Filles” was built between 1519 and 1524.
By then, the growing of vine was already established in the region and fully contributed to the local economy.
Two centuries later, with the development of trade, wines Houses naturally appeared. Under the reign of Louis XI, Simon Verry founded a House of burgundian wines and was allowed by the city to use the “Bastion de l’Oratoire”, clear of weapons and other objects witnessing the military history of the structure, to shelter his wines.
In 1790, the Bastion was at its best since it now shelters over 10 000 bottles of wine.
Its 8-metres thick walls protect wines from sunburn and winter bites. If “La Tour des Filles” owes its existence to the protection of a town and a power, it owes its survival to the protection of wine. A much more dignified vocation to some…

In the middle of the 9th century, while the Empire reached its end, wine trading is in full expansion. Alexis Chanson, then headmaster of the House, built two more levels to the structure which had become too small to welcome all the wines. In 1826, the Bastion reached its final shape.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.