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Chateau Croix - Mouton 2019

$45.00
Sale price

Regular price $45.00

From land originally planted to vines by the Romans, this wine is smoky, dense and blackly rich. Bold plum fruits and tannins that are on the cusp of softening are the prominent features of this mainly Merlot wine. Drink from 2022. 

The Producer

The history of the Château Croix Mouton dates back to the Gallo-Roman era, as evidenced by the remains of a very old viticultural past. Château Croix-Mouton is located along the many meanders of the Dordogne, in the city of Lugon. The architecture of the current premises and the presence of a very large fireplace dating from Louis XIV prove the importance of succession in the seventeenth century. Château Croix-Mouton is listed in the Guide Féret in 1881, like all major Bordeaux estates. At the beginning of the century, the estate changes owners and falls asleep little by little. At this time, his survival is solely due to his name. It is then bought in 1997 by Jean Philippe Janoueix. A particularity of Château Croix Mouton is that its “M” changes every year, a way for the property to mark any vintage that flows in color and form, because each year has its own personality.

The 55-hectare terroir consists of 85% Merlot, 14% Cabernet Franc and 1% Petit Verdot. The average age of the vines is 37 years old. Jean-Philippe Janoueix works every day with passion to build his wines at the level of the best wines of Bordeaux. After harvest, the grapes are put in tanks without being crushed and are then pumped more than 3 times a day. During the alcoholic fermentation, treading is performed every 6 hours. The malo-lactic fermentation is done in French oak barrels. The work in the vineyard is done in a traditional way: De-leafing and sustainable viticulture against diseases. Harvesting is at optimum maturity, even if it means accepting 10% rotting instead of 10% grapes. Virtually all botrytis and green waste are eliminated through the acquisition of a Mistral ® 100 NG, with a rejection rate of 6%. The wine is then aged on lees for 3 to 4 months.

At the tasting, Château Croix-Mouton offers a succulent expression of acidulous red fruits on the palate.

Their Wine

  • Owner : Jean-Philippe JANOUEIX
  • Consulting oenologist : Laboratoire Michel ROLLAND

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

From land originally planted to vines by the Romans, this wine is smoky, dense and blackly rich. Bold plum fruits and tannins that are on the cusp of softening are the prominent features of this mainly Merlot wine. Drink from 2022. 

The Producer

The history of the Château Croix Mouton dates back to the Gallo-Roman era, as evidenced by the remains of a very old viticultural past. Château Croix-Mouton is located along the many meanders of the Dordogne, in the city of Lugon. The architecture of the current premises and the presence of a very large fireplace dating from Louis XIV prove the importance of succession in the seventeenth century. Château Croix-Mouton is listed in the Guide Féret in 1881, like all major Bordeaux estates. At the beginning of the century, the estate changes owners and falls asleep little by little. At this time, his survival is solely due to his name. It is then bought in 1997 by Jean Philippe Janoueix. A particularity of Château Croix Mouton is that its “M” changes every year, a way for the property to mark any vintage that flows in color and form, because each year has its own personality.

The 55-hectare terroir consists of 85% Merlot, 14% Cabernet Franc and 1% Petit Verdot. The average age of the vines is 37 years old. Jean-Philippe Janoueix works every day with passion to build his wines at the level of the best wines of Bordeaux. After harvest, the grapes are put in tanks without being crushed and are then pumped more than 3 times a day. During the alcoholic fermentation, treading is performed every 6 hours. The malo-lactic fermentation is done in French oak barrels. The work in the vineyard is done in a traditional way: De-leafing and sustainable viticulture against diseases. Harvesting is at optimum maturity, even if it means accepting 10% rotting instead of 10% grapes. Virtually all botrytis and green waste are eliminated through the acquisition of a Mistral ® 100 NG, with a rejection rate of 6%. The wine is then aged on lees for 3 to 4 months.

At the tasting, Château Croix-Mouton offers a succulent expression of acidulous red fruits on the palate.

Their Wine

  • Owner : Jean-Philippe JANOUEIX
  • Consulting oenologist : Laboratoire Michel ROLLAND

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.