Chateau Léoville Poyferré 2011

$275.00
Sale price

Regular price $275.00

This property, which has been on a qualitative tear over the last generation, has produced one of the most successful wines of 2011. A blend of 60% Cabernet Sauvignon, 30% Merlot and the rest Petit Verdot and Cabernet Franc, it is broad, rich, medium to full-bodied and dense. It boasts an inky/purple color as well as lots of concentration, silky tannins, and a bigger, richer mouthfeel than any of its St.-Julien peers. The result is one of the stars of the vintage.

94
Robert Parker, Wine Advocate (212), May 2014

The Producer

Château Léoville Poyferré

WHY BUY IT ?

  • A Second Classified Growth of Saint-Julien
  • The know-how of the Cuvelier family, advised by Michel Rolland renowned oenologist
  • The promise of a great wine
  • The wines of Ch Léoville Poyferré are sought after for their incredible aromatic wealth, all in finesse, and their great capacity for aging.
  • One of the few wines in St-Julien to have been rated 100/100 by Robert Parker in 2009!

The history of Château Léoville Poyferré is completely linked to the Gascon culture. Indeed, typically Gascon, the name “Poyferré” means a “point férré”, a section of pavement where horses and vehicles must wear irons. Classified Second Cru in 1855, this beautiful vineyard comes from the former Léoville estate, located north of theSaint-Julien appellation. In 1920 the Cuvelier family acquired this property. Since 1979, major investments in restructuring and modernization have been made by the Cuvelier family in order to enhance the buildings and the terroir.

The vineyard of Château Léoville Poyferré sits on a terroir of gravel that brings a balance in the diet of the plant. The property has a real control plan, based on soil analyzes, which allows to monitor their state of health. Respect for the terroir and its integrity, maintaining the life of the soils worked by generations of winemakers, are the watchwords of the technical team, resolutely turned towards the future. Thanks to this strategy combining ancestral practices of viticulture and the tools offered by modernity, Château Léoville Poyferré produces wines in which its prestigious terroir expresses itself fully. The 80 hectares of the property are planted with 61% Cabernet Sauvignon, 27% Merlot, 8% Petit Verdot and 4% Cabernet Franc. The manual harvesting is done in crates and then sorted on tables mechanically and manually a first time before the clipping of the bunches and a second time mechanically and manually before crushing berries. The vatting will be done by grapes and by parcel in the 35 stainless steel vats of the vat. After multiple tastings, the wine is finally assembled: the nectar of the vats produces the Léoville-Poyferré which ages 75% in new barrels.

At the tasting, Château Léoville Poyferré offers an elegant and well-wooded wine, totally suitable for keeping.

Their Team

  • Owner: CUVELIER Family – G.F.A from Domaines de Saint-Julien
  • Manager: Didier CUVELIER
  • Cellar master: Didier THOMANN
  • Head of culture: Bruno CLENET
  • Oenologist of the Castle: Isabelle DAVIN
  • Consulting enologist: Michel ROLLAND

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

This property, which has been on a qualitative tear over the last generation, has produced one of the most successful wines of 2011. A blend of 60% Cabernet Sauvignon, 30% Merlot and the rest Petit Verdot and Cabernet Franc, it is broad, rich, medium to full-bodied and dense. It boasts an inky/purple color as well as lots of concentration, silky tannins, and a bigger, richer mouthfeel than any of its St.-Julien peers. The result is one of the stars of the vintage.

94
Robert Parker, Wine Advocate (212), May 2014

The Producer

Château Léoville Poyferré

WHY BUY IT ?

  • A Second Classified Growth of Saint-Julien
  • The know-how of the Cuvelier family, advised by Michel Rolland renowned oenologist
  • The promise of a great wine
  • The wines of Ch Léoville Poyferré are sought after for their incredible aromatic wealth, all in finesse, and their great capacity for aging.
  • One of the few wines in St-Julien to have been rated 100/100 by Robert Parker in 2009!

The history of Château Léoville Poyferré is completely linked to the Gascon culture. Indeed, typically Gascon, the name “Poyferré” means a “point férré”, a section of pavement where horses and vehicles must wear irons. Classified Second Cru in 1855, this beautiful vineyard comes from the former Léoville estate, located north of theSaint-Julien appellation. In 1920 the Cuvelier family acquired this property. Since 1979, major investments in restructuring and modernization have been made by the Cuvelier family in order to enhance the buildings and the terroir.

The vineyard of Château Léoville Poyferré sits on a terroir of gravel that brings a balance in the diet of the plant. The property has a real control plan, based on soil analyzes, which allows to monitor their state of health. Respect for the terroir and its integrity, maintaining the life of the soils worked by generations of winemakers, are the watchwords of the technical team, resolutely turned towards the future. Thanks to this strategy combining ancestral practices of viticulture and the tools offered by modernity, Château Léoville Poyferré produces wines in which its prestigious terroir expresses itself fully. The 80 hectares of the property are planted with 61% Cabernet Sauvignon, 27% Merlot, 8% Petit Verdot and 4% Cabernet Franc. The manual harvesting is done in crates and then sorted on tables mechanically and manually a first time before the clipping of the bunches and a second time mechanically and manually before crushing berries. The vatting will be done by grapes and by parcel in the 35 stainless steel vats of the vat. After multiple tastings, the wine is finally assembled: the nectar of the vats produces the Léoville-Poyferré which ages 75% in new barrels.

At the tasting, Château Léoville Poyferré offers an elegant and well-wooded wine, totally suitable for keeping.

Their Team

  • Owner: CUVELIER Family – G.F.A from Domaines de Saint-Julien
  • Manager: Didier CUVELIER
  • Cellar master: Didier THOMANN
  • Head of culture: Bruno CLENET
  • Oenologist of the Castle: Isabelle DAVIN
  • Consulting enologist: Michel ROLLAND

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.