Churton Sauvignon Blanc 2018

$28.00
Sale price

Regular price $28.00

VINEYARD | Our distinctive hillside vineyard above the Waihopai Valley was planted in 2000 with the European approach of close vine spacing and high density (approx. 5,000/ha). We manage the certified organic vineyard according to the principles of biodynamics. In 2019 we had a mild spring with good rainfall allowing early flowering in Sauvignon Blanc, starting around 10th December. This produced well-formed bunches with even fruit set. We moved into a very dry, hot summer with no significant rainfall until early March. Our vines faired exceptionally well during the drought; their deep roots and our healthy soils with good water retaining capacity giving them resilience. The March rain was very timely and served to refresh the vines well and give them a final push through to harvest. Sauvignon Harvest began on 31st March and everything was picked within 10 days. The fruit was well balanced at 22-23 Brix with fine acidity and slightly higher pH than normal.

WINEMAKING | All our fruit is hand harvested, every year. This was particularly pleasurable in 2019 with every bunch clean and golden in colour. Precision in our vineyard and winery work is essential, therefore, we pick each block separately, and hand sort everything at the winery to eliminate anything we didn’t like the look of! Our fruit was whole bunch pressed, then settled for 12 hours prior to racking to a combination of tank and barrel (50/50). Fermentation was long and slow and the various blocks were fermented separately and aged on lees for nine months prior to racking and blending.

CHURTON WINES

Biodynamic farming allows us to truly express our unique hillside vineyard site and its soil. We learn daily from our farm and are always seeking ways to challenge ourselves and convention, experimenting with a traditional approach to winemaking to bring out the best from our vines. We firmly believe that the source of exceptional wines lies in the vineyard.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

VINEYARD | Our distinctive hillside vineyard above the Waihopai Valley was planted in 2000 with the European approach of close vine spacing and high density (approx. 5,000/ha). We manage the certified organic vineyard according to the principles of biodynamics. In 2019 we had a mild spring with good rainfall allowing early flowering in Sauvignon Blanc, starting around 10th December. This produced well-formed bunches with even fruit set. We moved into a very dry, hot summer with no significant rainfall until early March. Our vines faired exceptionally well during the drought; their deep roots and our healthy soils with good water retaining capacity giving them resilience. The March rain was very timely and served to refresh the vines well and give them a final push through to harvest. Sauvignon Harvest began on 31st March and everything was picked within 10 days. The fruit was well balanced at 22-23 Brix with fine acidity and slightly higher pH than normal.

WINEMAKING | All our fruit is hand harvested, every year. This was particularly pleasurable in 2019 with every bunch clean and golden in colour. Precision in our vineyard and winery work is essential, therefore, we pick each block separately, and hand sort everything at the winery to eliminate anything we didn’t like the look of! Our fruit was whole bunch pressed, then settled for 12 hours prior to racking to a combination of tank and barrel (50/50). Fermentation was long and slow and the various blocks were fermented separately and aged on lees for nine months prior to racking and blending.

CHURTON WINES

Biodynamic farming allows us to truly express our unique hillside vineyard site and its soil. We learn daily from our farm and are always seeking ways to challenge ourselves and convention, experimenting with a traditional approach to winemaking to bring out the best from our vines. We firmly believe that the source of exceptional wines lies in the vineyard.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.