Churton Vineyards - 'Natural State' Pied De Cuve 2019

$27.00
Sale price

Regular price $27.00

"Our Natural State pied de cuve is Sauvignon Blanc from the Loin block.  Our pied de cuve wine starts in the vineyard, not only is the fruit grown on the Churton vineyard, the fermentation is started there using 100% pure indigenous yeast. Leading up to harvest our vineyard team collected samples as part of picking planning. Once samples are used and analyzed we keep the juice in the vineyard and let it start to ferment naturally - This is our starter. The pied de cuve fruit is hand picked, whole bunch pressed and left to ferment in old 500l puncheons along with our starter. The wine is then left on its lees for 9-12 months and racked before bottling with no fining nor filtering. This wine is vegan friendly with only a small amount of sulphur prior bottling.

Our Natural State pied de cuve is alive. It is a wine that takes the characters of the vineyard and brings them to life creating new dimensions and complexity. Our 2019 pied de cuve is fresh, fruity and full of texture, citrus fruit from start to finish with glimpses of wild flowers. Acidity and texture are the back bone to this autumn meets spring wine. "

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Churton

Churton was established in 1997 by Sam and Mandy Weaver. From site selection and bio-dynamic practices through to low intervention winemaking, Churton produces exceptional terroir driven wines.

Churton is a 22 hectare single vineyard and encompasses an undulating ridge line between the Omaka and Waihopai valleys in Marlborough, New Zealand. 200 metres above sea level, the distinctive property faces northeast and captures the cool morning and warm daytime sun ideal for slow and long ripening. Soils are older and denser than the neighbouring valley floor with good clay content

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Viognier

Viognier is an incredible aromatic white grape variety. It is most famous for its heady peach and apricot-filled white wines of Condrieu and Chateau-Grillet in the northern Rhone Valley of France. Some decent examples have sprouted up across the south of France and in the new world most notably in California and Australia where it is hot enough to get it ripe enough.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Marlborough

New Zealand's answer to Napa Valley, Marlborough accounts for the majority of New Zealand's vines and wine productionOver 75 percent of the vineyards are planted with Sauvignon Blanc and it is where this varietal really shines. The region is also home to New Zealand’s small sparkling-wine industry, using the traditional method to vinify Pinot Noir and Chardonnay.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

"Our Natural State pied de cuve is Sauvignon Blanc from the Loin block.  Our pied de cuve wine starts in the vineyard, not only is the fruit grown on the Churton vineyard, the fermentation is started there using 100% pure indigenous yeast. Leading up to harvest our vineyard team collected samples as part of picking planning. Once samples are used and analyzed we keep the juice in the vineyard and let it start to ferment naturally - This is our starter. The pied de cuve fruit is hand picked, whole bunch pressed and left to ferment in old 500l puncheons along with our starter. The wine is then left on its lees for 9-12 months and racked before bottling with no fining nor filtering. This wine is vegan friendly with only a small amount of sulphur prior bottling.

Our Natural State pied de cuve is alive. It is a wine that takes the characters of the vineyard and brings them to life creating new dimensions and complexity. Our 2019 pied de cuve is fresh, fruity and full of texture, citrus fruit from start to finish with glimpses of wild flowers. Acidity and texture are the back bone to this autumn meets spring wine. "

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Churton

Churton was established in 1997 by Sam and Mandy Weaver. From site selection and bio-dynamic practices through to low intervention winemaking, Churton produces exceptional terroir driven wines.

Churton is a 22 hectare single vineyard and encompasses an undulating ridge line between the Omaka and Waihopai valleys in Marlborough, New Zealand. 200 metres above sea level, the distinctive property faces northeast and captures the cool morning and warm daytime sun ideal for slow and long ripening. Soils are older and denser than the neighbouring valley floor with good clay content

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Viognier

Viognier is an incredible aromatic white grape variety. It is most famous for its heady peach and apricot-filled white wines of Condrieu and Chateau-Grillet in the northern Rhone Valley of France. Some decent examples have sprouted up across the south of France and in the new world most notably in California and Australia where it is hot enough to get it ripe enough.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Marlborough

New Zealand's answer to Napa Valley, Marlborough accounts for the majority of New Zealand's vines and wine productionOver 75 percent of the vineyards are planted with Sauvignon Blanc and it is where this varietal really shines. The region is also home to New Zealand’s small sparkling-wine industry, using the traditional method to vinify Pinot Noir and Chardonnay.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.