Coopers Creek Bell-Ringer Albarino 2019

$22.00
Sale price

Regular price $22.00
Albariño hails from the North West of Spain and Northern Portugal. This wine is so named because it tastes and smells as pure as the peal of a bell, and it was grown by Doug and Delwyn Bell in their vineyard just outside of Gisborne. We have only used free run juice from the Spanish ‘Mass Selection’ clone for this wine.

The fruit quality in 2019 was superb and eight prior vintages of experience with this vineyard gave us the confidence to try something new this year – so – a portion of juice went straight from the press into old barrels for a ‘wild and dirty’ ferment, and, a smaller portion of clarified juice went off to old barrels for a ‘wild and clean’ ferment. The resulting assemblage is around 23% wild ferment, with the bulk of that coming from the ‘wild and dirty’ component. This gives the wine extraordinary texture and mouth-watering salinity.

The Producer

Founded in 1980 by Andrew and Cynthia Hendry when the New Zealand wine industry was small and relatively unknown, Coopers Creek Vineyard has grown and matured over four decades into a top class winery with a strong international presence. It continues to innovate, particularly with new wine styles, introducing and pioneering promising new grape varieties that are ideal for cool climate regions. Viognier, Albariño, Arneis, Marsanne and Montepulciano are new varieties for New Zealand, but heading for stardom. Coopers Creek is satisfying a growing demand for these stylish varieties in addition to its longstanding pedigree with Chardonnay, Pinot, Syrah and Bordeaux reds.


Coopers Creek offers these new varieties under its SV (Select Vineyards) range, in addition to wines that are established performers such as Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and Pinot Gris. Each of the SV wines is outstanding with its cuisine match and the range is very popular on restaurant lists and with wine aficionados.

The top level Reserve tier offers wines of impressive stature, including the iconic Hawkes Bay Swamp Reserve Chardonnay. Supporting the Reserve and SV ranges is the Classics series, affordable wines that are attractive, fruit-driven styles and widely available in New Zealand and international markets.  

Crafting wines that are attractive, inspiring and stylish is Coopers Creek’s driving force. Pioneering and innovating has been its goal for the last forty years and that’s unlikely to change.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

Albariño hails from the North West of Spain and Northern Portugal. This wine is so named because it tastes and smells as pure as the peal of a bell, and it was grown by Doug and Delwyn Bell in their vineyard just outside of Gisborne. We have only used free run juice from the Spanish ‘Mass Selection’ clone for this wine.

The fruit quality in 2019 was superb and eight prior vintages of experience with this vineyard gave us the confidence to try something new this year – so – a portion of juice went straight from the press into old barrels for a ‘wild and dirty’ ferment, and, a smaller portion of clarified juice went off to old barrels for a ‘wild and clean’ ferment. The resulting assemblage is around 23% wild ferment, with the bulk of that coming from the ‘wild and dirty’ component. This gives the wine extraordinary texture and mouth-watering salinity.

The Producer

Founded in 1980 by Andrew and Cynthia Hendry when the New Zealand wine industry was small and relatively unknown, Coopers Creek Vineyard has grown and matured over four decades into a top class winery with a strong international presence. It continues to innovate, particularly with new wine styles, introducing and pioneering promising new grape varieties that are ideal for cool climate regions. Viognier, Albariño, Arneis, Marsanne and Montepulciano are new varieties for New Zealand, but heading for stardom. Coopers Creek is satisfying a growing demand for these stylish varieties in addition to its longstanding pedigree with Chardonnay, Pinot, Syrah and Bordeaux reds.


Coopers Creek offers these new varieties under its SV (Select Vineyards) range, in addition to wines that are established performers such as Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and Pinot Gris. Each of the SV wines is outstanding with its cuisine match and the range is very popular on restaurant lists and with wine aficionados.

The top level Reserve tier offers wines of impressive stature, including the iconic Hawkes Bay Swamp Reserve Chardonnay. Supporting the Reserve and SV ranges is the Classics series, affordable wines that are attractive, fruit-driven styles and widely available in New Zealand and international markets.  

Crafting wines that are attractive, inspiring and stylish is Coopers Creek’s driving force. Pioneering and innovating has been its goal for the last forty years and that’s unlikely to change.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.