Zind Humbrecht - 'Herrenweg de Turckheim' Pinot Gris 2013

$75.00
Sale price

Regular price $75.00
Tasting Notes :

3/2015: light elegant perfumed nose, showing some toasty nutty aromas and surprising stony elements. Light fresh palate, quite unexpected, with a dry clean finish. This is a very pure nice Herrenweg and hopefully a good example of the future.

All Pinot Gris in the Herrenweg were planted in the early 1990s. The vines are still young in behaviour and it explains big stylistic variations from vintage to vintage and also why it is often declassified in Alsace Pinot Gris. Herrenweg is also an extremely precocious vineyard. The gravely valley floor warms up quickly and needs more rainfall than any other vineyards on the estate. Despite the early August hail, this variety performed very well in 2013. We were lucky that the hail impact on the grapes healed quickly and didn’t cause any quality problems, but only some crop reduction. The Pinot Gris is also planted East/West and these rows were also less affected. The grapes took longer to ripen and achieved lower than usual sugar maturity, so the wine was also able to finish dry in 2013. All this motivated us to declare this wine as Herrenweg in 2013.



Tasting Notes :

3/2015: light elegant perfumed nose, showing some toasty nutty aromas and surprising stony elements. Light fresh palate, quite unexpected, with a dry clean finish. This is a very pure nice Herrenweg and hopefully a good example of the future.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Zind Humbrecht

Winegrowing is a passion that has been passed down from father to son in the Humbrecht family since the 17th century. Domaine Zind Humbrecht today comprises of 40 hectares of vines, spread out over an array of different terroirs in the geological patchwork which is the Alsatian wine region and birthplace of our noble grape varieties.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Pinot Gris/Pinot Grigio

Pinot Gris is one of the most instantly recognised white grape varietals of the world. Known as one of the 'noble grapes' in Alsace where it is often produced as an off-dry to luscious sweet wines with a range of pear and stonefruit flavours. However, in Italy it is known as Pinot Grigio up in the Alto-Adige and Friuli regions of northern Italy. 

 

--------THE REGION--------

Alsace

Alsace is the aromatic capital of France. Located up in the northeast along the German border. Where most regions in France are home to one red and one white grape, Alsace is actually home to a handful. The 'noble grapes' here are Pinot Gris, Riesling, Pinot Gris, and Muscat.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

Tasting Notes :

3/2015: light elegant perfumed nose, showing some toasty nutty aromas and surprising stony elements. Light fresh palate, quite unexpected, with a dry clean finish. This is a very pure nice Herrenweg and hopefully a good example of the future.

All Pinot Gris in the Herrenweg were planted in the early 1990s. The vines are still young in behaviour and it explains big stylistic variations from vintage to vintage and also why it is often declassified in Alsace Pinot Gris. Herrenweg is also an extremely precocious vineyard. The gravely valley floor warms up quickly and needs more rainfall than any other vineyards on the estate. Despite the early August hail, this variety performed very well in 2013. We were lucky that the hail impact on the grapes healed quickly and didn’t cause any quality problems, but only some crop reduction. The Pinot Gris is also planted East/West and these rows were also less affected. The grapes took longer to ripen and achieved lower than usual sugar maturity, so the wine was also able to finish dry in 2013. All this motivated us to declare this wine as Herrenweg in 2013.



Tasting Notes :

3/2015: light elegant perfumed nose, showing some toasty nutty aromas and surprising stony elements. Light fresh palate, quite unexpected, with a dry clean finish. This is a very pure nice Herrenweg and hopefully a good example of the future.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Zind Humbrecht

Winegrowing is a passion that has been passed down from father to son in the Humbrecht family since the 17th century. Domaine Zind Humbrecht today comprises of 40 hectares of vines, spread out over an array of different terroirs in the geological patchwork which is the Alsatian wine region and birthplace of our noble grape varieties.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Pinot Gris/Pinot Grigio

Pinot Gris is one of the most instantly recognised white grape varietals of the world. Known as one of the 'noble grapes' in Alsace where it is often produced as an off-dry to luscious sweet wines with a range of pear and stonefruit flavours. However, in Italy it is known as Pinot Grigio up in the Alto-Adige and Friuli regions of northern Italy. 

 

--------THE REGION--------

Alsace

Alsace is the aromatic capital of France. Located up in the northeast along the German border. Where most regions in France are home to one red and one white grape, Alsace is actually home to a handful. The 'noble grapes' here are Pinot Gris, Riesling, Pinot Gris, and Muscat.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.