Alta Mora - Etna Bianco DOC 2019

$45.00
Sale price

Regular price $45.00

"Alta Mora Etna Bianco is comprised of the indigenous Sicilian grape, Carricante. This wine is a slight nod to Sauvignon Blanc. It is fresh, fruity with great minerality and a great classic with seafood dishes." 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Alta Mora

Alta Mora is a winery from the Cusumano family where grapes are grown and harvested on the slopes of the active volcano, Mt. Etna, in Sicily.  It has been a lifelong dream for the Cusumano brothers to build a winery among these fertile and dynamic soils. The name Alta Mora translates to “Tall, Black” representing the great heights of the vineyards on the mountain and the dark, black volcanic soil. The volcano itself is nearly 3350m high and vineyards are planted up to 1200m.

--------THE GRAPE--------

Carricante

Carrcante is an ancient white wine grape variety from eastern Sicily, thought to have been growing on the volcanic slopes of Mount Etna for at least a thousand years. The variety is known for its pronounced acidity, and the high yields which gave rise to its name (carica means "load" in Italian).
The best examples come from vines grown in volcanic soils, at high altitude (Etna's vineyards stretch up as high as 3940ft /1200m).

Well-adapted to their environment, Carricante vines respond well to the high diurnal temperature variations that characterise the climate around Mt. Etna. 

On the whole, Carricante wines offer a broad range of refreshing citrus aromas – anything from lemon and lime to grapefruit to orange – alongside cooling herbal notes such as mint and aniseed. An underlying mineral, slatey character is also to be found in the finest examples. When aged in stainless steel and without lees contact, notes of tart green apple shine through – a searing reminder of the variety's naturally high acidity. Weightier Carricante wines (particularly later-harvested examples) are complemented by honeyed hints and the creamy texture that results from lees contact.


--------THE REGION--------

Sicily

Sicily is the island off the south coast of Italy. It is famous for being home to Mt Etna - now a region that is producing some of Sicily's most exciting red and white wines. Overall, Sicily is home to a raft of interesting whites and reds that are light and interesting to fuller in body and age-worthy.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

"Alta Mora Etna Bianco is comprised of the indigenous Sicilian grape, Carricante. This wine is a slight nod to Sauvignon Blanc. It is fresh, fruity with great minerality and a great classic with seafood dishes." 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Alta Mora

Alta Mora is a winery from the Cusumano family where grapes are grown and harvested on the slopes of the active volcano, Mt. Etna, in Sicily.  It has been a lifelong dream for the Cusumano brothers to build a winery among these fertile and dynamic soils. The name Alta Mora translates to “Tall, Black” representing the great heights of the vineyards on the mountain and the dark, black volcanic soil. The volcano itself is nearly 3350m high and vineyards are planted up to 1200m.

--------THE GRAPE--------

Carricante

Carrcante is an ancient white wine grape variety from eastern Sicily, thought to have been growing on the volcanic slopes of Mount Etna for at least a thousand years. The variety is known for its pronounced acidity, and the high yields which gave rise to its name (carica means "load" in Italian).
The best examples come from vines grown in volcanic soils, at high altitude (Etna's vineyards stretch up as high as 3940ft /1200m).

Well-adapted to their environment, Carricante vines respond well to the high diurnal temperature variations that characterise the climate around Mt. Etna. 

On the whole, Carricante wines offer a broad range of refreshing citrus aromas – anything from lemon and lime to grapefruit to orange – alongside cooling herbal notes such as mint and aniseed. An underlying mineral, slatey character is also to be found in the finest examples. When aged in stainless steel and without lees contact, notes of tart green apple shine through – a searing reminder of the variety's naturally high acidity. Weightier Carricante wines (particularly later-harvested examples) are complemented by honeyed hints and the creamy texture that results from lees contact.


--------THE REGION--------

Sicily

Sicily is the island off the south coast of Italy. It is famous for being home to Mt Etna - now a region that is producing some of Sicily's most exciting red and white wines. Overall, Sicily is home to a raft of interesting whites and reds that are light and interesting to fuller in body and age-worthy.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.