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Château Thivin - Brouilly 17

$40.00
Sale price

Regular price $40.00

A wine full of freshness and fruit.
From the granitic arena of the “Reverdon” locality opposite Mont Brouilly.


GRAPE VARIETIES

White-juiced Gamay noir

TERROIR

On a due east-facing 5.5 ha hillside, on a formation of the first foothills of the Massif Central, with a soil of friable pink granite containing little organic matter. Two cadoles (dry-stone huts), one from the 18th century, testify to the historic nature of this terroir.
This is a part of the appellation that we particularly like, for the Granitic purity and its poor soils that give distinctive wines with very elegant fruit aromas.

CULTIVATION

Grassed or tilled strips break up this terroir prone to storms, little sensitivity to diseases because of the well-drained soil, demands few treatments in Summer. The grapes are picked by hand and transported in small trays in order to preserve their quality.

VINIFICATION

Vinification in whole bunches in our hillside cellars, whose successive levels allow us to make maximum use of gravity, so as to avoid using either pumps or conveyors for the grapes.
Maceration for only 8 days in order to capture all the freshness of the fruit, matured for 7 months in cement vats.

TASTING

Beautiful cherry red colour, floral, fruity bouquet, round on the palate with fresh garden fruits; underpinned by supple tannins. Serving temperature: 14–16°C.

SERVE WITH

A wine that can be enjoyed throughout a whole meal!
It goes marvellously well with cold cuts and white meats."

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Chateau Thivin

Since 1743 our family has been handing down from generation to generation this passion for the wine-grower’s trade, respect for our terroirs, precious know-how, and a quest for excellence.

On 8 June 1877, Zaccharie and Marguerite Geoffray bought Château Thivin and its two hectares of vineyards surrounding the estate (Le Clos).

Each succeeding generation would contribute new plots of land to build up the estate and would develop the growing and wine-making methods. Today, the 5th and 6the generations of the Geoffray family run this small family business, work the estate’s vineyards, and vinify each wine, respecting the terroir of its origin as the seasons change.

Today, Claude Vincent is happy and proud to take his three grandchildren Tobias, Nicolas, and Florina into the vineyards and the cellar so as to initiate them in the secrets of the craft and give them a taste for working the land.

--------THE GRAPE--------

Gamay Noir

Gamay is a purple-coloured grape variety used to make red wines, most notably grown in Beaujolais and in the Loire Valley around Tours. Its full name is Gamay Noir à Jus Blanc. It is a very old cultivar, mentioned as long ago as the 15th century.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Brouilly

Brouilly is an appellation for red wines produced from vineyards in central-north Beaujolais. The lower slopes of Mont Brouilly and the surrounding countryside contain significant plantings of the Gamay grape variety. Relatively robust and full-bodied wines are made, quite unlike the light, fresh Beaujolais Nouveau wines. The wines are more fruit-driven than many of the other Beaujolais cru wines, their plum and berry flavours outweighing Gamay's traditional floral character.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

A wine full of freshness and fruit.
From the granitic arena of the “Reverdon” locality opposite Mont Brouilly.


GRAPE VARIETIES

White-juiced Gamay noir

TERROIR

On a due east-facing 5.5 ha hillside, on a formation of the first foothills of the Massif Central, with a soil of friable pink granite containing little organic matter. Two cadoles (dry-stone huts), one from the 18th century, testify to the historic nature of this terroir.
This is a part of the appellation that we particularly like, for the Granitic purity and its poor soils that give distinctive wines with very elegant fruit aromas.

CULTIVATION

Grassed or tilled strips break up this terroir prone to storms, little sensitivity to diseases because of the well-drained soil, demands few treatments in Summer. The grapes are picked by hand and transported in small trays in order to preserve their quality.

VINIFICATION

Vinification in whole bunches in our hillside cellars, whose successive levels allow us to make maximum use of gravity, so as to avoid using either pumps or conveyors for the grapes.
Maceration for only 8 days in order to capture all the freshness of the fruit, matured for 7 months in cement vats.

TASTING

Beautiful cherry red colour, floral, fruity bouquet, round on the palate with fresh garden fruits; underpinned by supple tannins. Serving temperature: 14–16°C.

SERVE WITH

A wine that can be enjoyed throughout a whole meal!
It goes marvellously well with cold cuts and white meats."

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Chateau Thivin

Since 1743 our family has been handing down from generation to generation this passion for the wine-grower’s trade, respect for our terroirs, precious know-how, and a quest for excellence.

On 8 June 1877, Zaccharie and Marguerite Geoffray bought Château Thivin and its two hectares of vineyards surrounding the estate (Le Clos).

Each succeeding generation would contribute new plots of land to build up the estate and would develop the growing and wine-making methods. Today, the 5th and 6the generations of the Geoffray family run this small family business, work the estate’s vineyards, and vinify each wine, respecting the terroir of its origin as the seasons change.

Today, Claude Vincent is happy and proud to take his three grandchildren Tobias, Nicolas, and Florina into the vineyards and the cellar so as to initiate them in the secrets of the craft and give them a taste for working the land.

--------THE GRAPE--------

Gamay Noir

Gamay is a purple-coloured grape variety used to make red wines, most notably grown in Beaujolais and in the Loire Valley around Tours. Its full name is Gamay Noir à Jus Blanc. It is a very old cultivar, mentioned as long ago as the 15th century.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Brouilly

Brouilly is an appellation for red wines produced from vineyards in central-north Beaujolais. The lower slopes of Mont Brouilly and the surrounding countryside contain significant plantings of the Gamay grape variety. Relatively robust and full-bodied wines are made, quite unlike the light, fresh Beaujolais Nouveau wines. The wines are more fruit-driven than many of the other Beaujolais cru wines, their plum and berry flavours outweighing Gamay's traditional floral character.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.