Highland Queen 'Majesty 1993' Private Cask Single Malt Scotch Whisky

$155.00
Sale price

Regular price $155.00

This new limited private cask collection release from Highland Queen is everything a Speyside whisky should be. Rich in fruit, florals and xmas spice cake leading into tastes of Mocha, ripe cherries and chocolate orange. A lingering sweet, peppery character to finish.

A 22-year-old single malt whisky from an undisclosed Speyside Distillery. Distilled in 1993, aged in a single cask, before being bottled in 2015, yielding 230 bottles.

  

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Highland Queen

The birth of Highland Queen was in 1893, when Roderick Macdonald decided to set up in business for the first time. The company was known as Macdonald & Muir Ltd. Within 10 years of starting his business, Roderick Macdonald had developed his blends to the stage where he believed he could successfully enter the production field. This resulted in the acquisition of the Glenmorangie Distillery in Tain to supply the whisky for the base of his famous Highland Queen blend.

Highland Queen was the flag carrier of Macdonald & Muir Ltd for most of the 20th century. The brand name derives from the association of the port of Leith and the original production site by the harbour of Macdonald & Muir in 1893, and the triumphal arrival of Mary Stuart at this spot in 1561. She was later to be crowned Queen of Scots, thus creating one of Scotland's most famous and loved legends. This legend is kept alive today through Highland Queen Scotch Whisky, which represents the enduring and noble values, history and independent spirit of Scotland and its whisky, embodied in the legendary character of Mary Queen of Scots.

Roderick Macdonald was a great traveller, and spent a great deal of his time travelling the world introducing his famous Highland Queen blend to the different markets. Highland Queen was sold in the traditional way, with Roderick establishing long term relationships which have ensured that even today the brand retains awareness and equity around the world. He would send the orders back to Leith during his travels and the whisky was then shipped out around the world. By the end of the 1970's Highland Queen could claim to be marketed in virtually every world economy where Scotch could be legally imported, and was a household name in many of these.

Towards the end of the 20th century however the focus of the company changed, and this saw the gradual decline in the market presence of Highland Queen. Following a change of ownership of Macdonald & Muir Ltd in 2008, the brand was purchased by another family company and the Highland Queen Scotch Whisky Company was established at our distillery, Tullibardine, in the Scottish Highlands.

In the same way that Roderick travelled the world in the last century to build his famous Highland Queen blend, today a small team of dedicated and passionate people are working hard to ensure that Highland Queen regains its rightful place in the Scotch Whisky Industry.

Once an exclusive blend has been achieved, the art of the distillers and blenders must be safeguarded down the ages to ensure that its identity remains constant forever. Highland Queen is the result of many lifetimes of experience in distilling and blending fine Scotch Whiskies, and we are proud to continue today the tradition first started by Roderick Macdonald, and as we declare on our label:

"The result we leave with confidence to your judgement".

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

This new limited private cask collection release from Highland Queen is everything a Speyside whisky should be. Rich in fruit, florals and xmas spice cake leading into tastes of Mocha, ripe cherries and chocolate orange. A lingering sweet, peppery character to finish.

A 22-year-old single malt whisky from an undisclosed Speyside Distillery. Distilled in 1993, aged in a single cask, before being bottled in 2015, yielding 230 bottles.

  

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Highland Queen

The birth of Highland Queen was in 1893, when Roderick Macdonald decided to set up in business for the first time. The company was known as Macdonald & Muir Ltd. Within 10 years of starting his business, Roderick Macdonald had developed his blends to the stage where he believed he could successfully enter the production field. This resulted in the acquisition of the Glenmorangie Distillery in Tain to supply the whisky for the base of his famous Highland Queen blend.

Highland Queen was the flag carrier of Macdonald & Muir Ltd for most of the 20th century. The brand name derives from the association of the port of Leith and the original production site by the harbour of Macdonald & Muir in 1893, and the triumphal arrival of Mary Stuart at this spot in 1561. She was later to be crowned Queen of Scots, thus creating one of Scotland's most famous and loved legends. This legend is kept alive today through Highland Queen Scotch Whisky, which represents the enduring and noble values, history and independent spirit of Scotland and its whisky, embodied in the legendary character of Mary Queen of Scots.

Roderick Macdonald was a great traveller, and spent a great deal of his time travelling the world introducing his famous Highland Queen blend to the different markets. Highland Queen was sold in the traditional way, with Roderick establishing long term relationships which have ensured that even today the brand retains awareness and equity around the world. He would send the orders back to Leith during his travels and the whisky was then shipped out around the world. By the end of the 1970's Highland Queen could claim to be marketed in virtually every world economy where Scotch could be legally imported, and was a household name in many of these.

Towards the end of the 20th century however the focus of the company changed, and this saw the gradual decline in the market presence of Highland Queen. Following a change of ownership of Macdonald & Muir Ltd in 2008, the brand was purchased by another family company and the Highland Queen Scotch Whisky Company was established at our distillery, Tullibardine, in the Scottish Highlands.

In the same way that Roderick travelled the world in the last century to build his famous Highland Queen blend, today a small team of dedicated and passionate people are working hard to ensure that Highland Queen regains its rightful place in the Scotch Whisky Industry.

Once an exclusive blend has been achieved, the art of the distillers and blenders must be safeguarded down the ages to ensure that its identity remains constant forever. Highland Queen is the result of many lifetimes of experience in distilling and blending fine Scotch Whiskies, and we are proud to continue today the tradition first started by Roderick Macdonald, and as we declare on our label:

"The result we leave with confidence to your judgement".

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.