144 Island - 'Melika's Field' White Blend 2020

$34.00
Sale price

Regular price $34.00

"Enticing and attractive aromas and flavours of tropical fruits, sweet honey, citrus fruits, peach and fresh herbs. A fine lees autolysis and minerality, complexity and satin texture. Acidity brings contrast and enhances the flavours of citrus and minerality and introduces a lite saline note. Balanced and well made, ready to drink upon purchase and through 2025.”

2020 Melika’s Field - 2200 bottles produced. Made from a series of co-harvested and co-fermented selections of fruit from around our Home Block vineyard, taken during the 2020 vintage. Whole-bunch pressing, indigenous barrel-fermentation in a mixture of 500l oak puncheons and 225l acacia barriques. Full solids contact without any racking, fortnightly battonnage. Unfined, coarsely filtered. Ginger root, magnolia floral aromatics, figs, bush honey, tropical guava, pink grapefruit. Mineral, Saline, Complex, Intriguing. 12.8% alc.

Sauvignon Blanc (53%), Semillon (27 %), Albarino (15%), Petit Manseng (5%)"

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

144 Islands

144 Islands is dedicated to the production of quality single-vineyard wines from our home estate in the Bay of Islands, as well as specially selected sites throughout the Far North of New Zealand. We place emphasis on producing wines that convey a point of time and place, honouring the rich history of our region, the birthplace of our nation.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Sauvignon Blanc, Semillon, Albariño and Petit Manseng


 

--------THE REGION--------

Northland

Its northern location and close proximity to the sea give the Northland region an almost subtropical climate – humid, sunny and warm.

Warm spring temperatures, hot dry summers, and calm, clear autumn days allow fruit to ripen early, creating full-bodied and rich wines.
The first vines in New Zealand were planted in the Bay of Islands by the missionary, Reverend Samuel Marsden in 1819.

In the late 1800s, the Croatian gumdiggers arrived bringing their European tradition of winemaking.

The region's tropical Chardonnays, popular Pinot Gris and vibrant Viogniers are leading the white wine growth. Red wines produced include spicy Syrahs, stylish Cabernet and Merlot blends, peppery Pinotages and complex Chambourcin.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

"Enticing and attractive aromas and flavours of tropical fruits, sweet honey, citrus fruits, peach and fresh herbs. A fine lees autolysis and minerality, complexity and satin texture. Acidity brings contrast and enhances the flavours of citrus and minerality and introduces a lite saline note. Balanced and well made, ready to drink upon purchase and through 2025.”

2020 Melika’s Field - 2200 bottles produced. Made from a series of co-harvested and co-fermented selections of fruit from around our Home Block vineyard, taken during the 2020 vintage. Whole-bunch pressing, indigenous barrel-fermentation in a mixture of 500l oak puncheons and 225l acacia barriques. Full solids contact without any racking, fortnightly battonnage. Unfined, coarsely filtered. Ginger root, magnolia floral aromatics, figs, bush honey, tropical guava, pink grapefruit. Mineral, Saline, Complex, Intriguing. 12.8% alc.

Sauvignon Blanc (53%), Semillon (27 %), Albarino (15%), Petit Manseng (5%)"

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

144 Islands

144 Islands is dedicated to the production of quality single-vineyard wines from our home estate in the Bay of Islands, as well as specially selected sites throughout the Far North of New Zealand. We place emphasis on producing wines that convey a point of time and place, honouring the rich history of our region, the birthplace of our nation.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Sauvignon Blanc, Semillon, Albariño and Petit Manseng


 

--------THE REGION--------

Northland

Its northern location and close proximity to the sea give the Northland region an almost subtropical climate – humid, sunny and warm.

Warm spring temperatures, hot dry summers, and calm, clear autumn days allow fruit to ripen early, creating full-bodied and rich wines.
The first vines in New Zealand were planted in the Bay of Islands by the missionary, Reverend Samuel Marsden in 1819.

In the late 1800s, the Croatian gumdiggers arrived bringing their European tradition of winemaking.

The region's tropical Chardonnays, popular Pinot Gris and vibrant Viogniers are leading the white wine growth. Red wines produced include spicy Syrahs, stylish Cabernet and Merlot blends, peppery Pinotages and complex Chambourcin.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.