Bedin - Prosecco Xtra Dry DOC NV

$24.00
Sale price

Regular price $24.00

TASTING NOTES
Delicate fine perlage, persistent and vivacious. It bursts on the nose with an intense bouquet of golden apple and pear, flowing into delicate hints of acacia and wisteria blossoms. On the palate, acidity balances perfectly with the initial light sweetness. The taste is delicate yet persistent with a round, very elegant finish.

FOOD PAIRING
A lovely fresh grapey prosecco with real class that is ideal for any celebration. Its elegance and food-pairing versatility have made it Bedin’s signature wine.

SERVING TEMPERATURE
6 – 8 °C

GRAPE VARIETY OR BLEND
100% Glera.

TERROIR AND CLIMATE
The Glera grapes for our Prosecco DOC Treviso spumante brut are harvested from family-owned vineyards located at the foot of the hills called “Colli Asolani” (within the province of Treviso, Veneto). These vineyards are at an altitude of about 150mt above sea level, have good sun exposure and benefit from the mild, temperate climate of the area. The soil composition is a balanced combination of silt, clay and sand.

YIELD
18 tons/ha. Estimated yield per plant: 7-8 kg.

WINEMAKING
The destemmed grapes are soft pressed and the juice is fermented at low temperature in a stainless steel tank to preserve the fresh fruit flavors that are typical from the Glera variety. After about 10 days the wine has achieved a sufficient, yet low alcohol content and the primary fermentation is complete. Bubbles are developed naturally during the secondary fermentation, according to the Martinotti-Charmat method. We introduce the base wine into pressurised stainless steel tanks along with selected yeasts and sugar which stimulate the production of natural bubbles of carbon dioxide in the wine. At the end of the process the wine is left with a very low residual sugar. After achieving DOC certification, the Prosecco is bottled under pressure to preserve the bubbles, using our state-of-the-art bottling line.

TECHNICAL DATA
Alcohol: 11% vol
Total acidity: 5,5‰
Dry extract: 15‰
Residual sugar: 15 g/l
Pressure: 4,5 bar

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Bedin -  Società Agricola Colli Asolani

The history of the “Società Agricola Colli Asolani” dates back to the early 1900, when the great grandfather Giovanni Bedin started working as a nurseryman and growing his own vines. At that time in northern Italy the rural landscape was dominated by vines growing together with mulberries, whose leaves constituted the sole food source for silkworms.

Giacomo Bedin, the grandfather, inherited his father’s passion for the land and followed his footsteps purchasing the estate in Cornuda in 1948. Here, in the smooth fertile hills that overlook the sanctuary of “Madonna della Rocca”, he planted the first vineyards and passed down to his son Giovanni the constancy and resourcefulness of the past generations.

Giovanni Bedin combined the ever increasing viticultural activity with stock-breeding. Under his direction, in the late ‘60s, the company promoted the first edition of the “Mostra del vino” in Cornuda: a traditional wine exhibition that contributed to the strengthening of the relationship between the territory, its inhabitants and its quality wines, destined to become internationally-awarded excellences. Giovanni carried on the stock-breeding activity until the second half of the ‘80s and planted three hectares of vineyards altogether, introducing his sons to the art of winemaking.

Enrico Bedin, the current owner, and his brothers Luigi, Denis and Damiano joined the company and marked a turning point by gradually transforming it from a traditional farm to a modern winery, in line with prevailing market demands. The Bedin brothers, remaining faithful to the core values they inherited from their ancestors, enriched the estate with the acquisition of new vineyards and the construction of new winemaking, bottling and packaging facilities.

Today the “Società Agricola Colli Asolani”, with its 40 hectares of vineyards, is a modern winery, projected into the future but well-rooted in the past of his homeland. After four generations, the Bedin family still manages to transform its passion into a career, combining the careful attention to product quality with the efforts to enhance and promote the territory through the preservation of autoctone vines, rich in aromas and flavours of the local countryside.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Glera

Glera might not ring a bell to you but we bet Prosecco does. Prosecco is that fun and famous sparkling wine that tastes of apples, peaches and white florals. It comes from across the Veneto in northern Italy. Prosecco is the name of the wine but Glera is the name of the grape. Many people still call Glera by Prosecco but it was only recently changed to Glera officially in the region.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Trento

Trento is a region in the northeast of Italy. It borders the regions of Alto-Adige and Friuli-Venezia Giulia. Like the aforementioned regions, it too is home to many crisp white wines and light red wines.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

TASTING NOTES
Delicate fine perlage, persistent and vivacious. It bursts on the nose with an intense bouquet of golden apple and pear, flowing into delicate hints of acacia and wisteria blossoms. On the palate, acidity balances perfectly with the initial light sweetness. The taste is delicate yet persistent with a round, very elegant finish.

FOOD PAIRING
A lovely fresh grapey prosecco with real class that is ideal for any celebration. Its elegance and food-pairing versatility have made it Bedin’s signature wine.

SERVING TEMPERATURE
6 – 8 °C

GRAPE VARIETY OR BLEND
100% Glera.

TERROIR AND CLIMATE
The Glera grapes for our Prosecco DOC Treviso spumante brut are harvested from family-owned vineyards located at the foot of the hills called “Colli Asolani” (within the province of Treviso, Veneto). These vineyards are at an altitude of about 150mt above sea level, have good sun exposure and benefit from the mild, temperate climate of the area. The soil composition is a balanced combination of silt, clay and sand.

YIELD
18 tons/ha. Estimated yield per plant: 7-8 kg.

WINEMAKING
The destemmed grapes are soft pressed and the juice is fermented at low temperature in a stainless steel tank to preserve the fresh fruit flavors that are typical from the Glera variety. After about 10 days the wine has achieved a sufficient, yet low alcohol content and the primary fermentation is complete. Bubbles are developed naturally during the secondary fermentation, according to the Martinotti-Charmat method. We introduce the base wine into pressurised stainless steel tanks along with selected yeasts and sugar which stimulate the production of natural bubbles of carbon dioxide in the wine. At the end of the process the wine is left with a very low residual sugar. After achieving DOC certification, the Prosecco is bottled under pressure to preserve the bubbles, using our state-of-the-art bottling line.

TECHNICAL DATA
Alcohol: 11% vol
Total acidity: 5,5‰
Dry extract: 15‰
Residual sugar: 15 g/l
Pressure: 4,5 bar

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Bedin -  Società Agricola Colli Asolani

The history of the “Società Agricola Colli Asolani” dates back to the early 1900, when the great grandfather Giovanni Bedin started working as a nurseryman and growing his own vines. At that time in northern Italy the rural landscape was dominated by vines growing together with mulberries, whose leaves constituted the sole food source for silkworms.

Giacomo Bedin, the grandfather, inherited his father’s passion for the land and followed his footsteps purchasing the estate in Cornuda in 1948. Here, in the smooth fertile hills that overlook the sanctuary of “Madonna della Rocca”, he planted the first vineyards and passed down to his son Giovanni the constancy and resourcefulness of the past generations.

Giovanni Bedin combined the ever increasing viticultural activity with stock-breeding. Under his direction, in the late ‘60s, the company promoted the first edition of the “Mostra del vino” in Cornuda: a traditional wine exhibition that contributed to the strengthening of the relationship between the territory, its inhabitants and its quality wines, destined to become internationally-awarded excellences. Giovanni carried on the stock-breeding activity until the second half of the ‘80s and planted three hectares of vineyards altogether, introducing his sons to the art of winemaking.

Enrico Bedin, the current owner, and his brothers Luigi, Denis and Damiano joined the company and marked a turning point by gradually transforming it from a traditional farm to a modern winery, in line with prevailing market demands. The Bedin brothers, remaining faithful to the core values they inherited from their ancestors, enriched the estate with the acquisition of new vineyards and the construction of new winemaking, bottling and packaging facilities.

Today the “Società Agricola Colli Asolani”, with its 40 hectares of vineyards, is a modern winery, projected into the future but well-rooted in the past of his homeland. After four generations, the Bedin family still manages to transform its passion into a career, combining the careful attention to product quality with the efforts to enhance and promote the territory through the preservation of autoctone vines, rich in aromas and flavours of the local countryside.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Glera

Glera might not ring a bell to you but we bet Prosecco does. Prosecco is that fun and famous sparkling wine that tastes of apples, peaches and white florals. It comes from across the Veneto in northern Italy. Prosecco is the name of the wine but Glera is the name of the grape. Many people still call Glera by Prosecco but it was only recently changed to Glera officially in the region.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Trento

Trento is a region in the northeast of Italy. It borders the regions of Alto-Adige and Friuli-Venezia Giulia. Like the aforementioned regions, it too is home to many crisp white wines and light red wines.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.