Belasco de Baquedano - 'Antracita' Ice Wine Malbec 2015 375ml

$75.00
Sale price

Regular price $75.00

"A wine of an intense violet red colour that treasures aromas of great complexity, figs and ripe plums, harmoniously accompanied by notes of caramel and walnut. Rich on the palate, powerful, unctuous, with an extraordinary balance of alcohol, acidity and sugar that reaffirms the aromas perceived in the nose, together with all of the strength of the terroir (altitude, temperature range and sun). It reveals optimum persistence and a perfect assemblage with the Allier oak. All of the alcohol and sweetness comes entirely from the over-ripened grape."

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Belasco de Baquedano

Belasco de Baquedano is a leading winery located in the Mendoza region of Argentina. The winery is lucky enough to have very old vines of original Malbec vines first planted in 1910 - these old vines are the secret to Belasco De Baquedano's success. The old vines consistently produce wines that are full-bodied, juicy and complex with layers of flavour development.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Malbec

Malbec is probably best known as being the red grape variety behind the juicy, full-bodied red wines of Mendoza in Argentina. It is historically from the South-West of France in the region of Cahors. In both of these regions it produces single varietal wines which are loaded with black fruit flavours. 

 

--------THE REGION--------

Mendoza

In the center west of the territory, at the foot of the Andes mountain range, Mendoza holds 75% of the total vineyards in Argentina and the largest number of wineries in the country. This makes it the most important wine province and one of the main producing centres in the world.

The highest peaks of the Andes are found in Mendoza: with 22.832 ft, Aconcagua is the highest peak in America. The presence of the Andes, which act as a barrier to the humid winds of the Pacific, added to the distance to the Atlantic Ocean, shape the climate generating ideal conditions for the cultivation of vines. The altitude, continental climate, heterogeneity of soils and the snowmelt are key factors for the production of excellent wines, which add to a significant winemaking tradition.

The territory of Mendoza can be divided into five large sub-regions, which give the varieties their particular characteristics: Valle de Uco GI, integrated by the departments of Tunuyán, Tupungato and San Carlos; Primera Zona, which includes the departments of Luján de Cuyo and Maipú; the Northern oasis (Lavalle and Las Heras), the East (San Martín, Rivadavia, Junín, Santa Rosa and La Paz) and the South (San Rafael, Malargüe and General Alvear), covering practically the entire provincial geography.

The high degree of development achieved by viticulture, added to new research promoted by a generation of restless producers, has led to the identification of micro-regions with different terroirs, reflecting the diverse character of Argentine viticulture. It is specifically in Malbec where this quality is best appreciated.

With 20% of the total area of Malbec planted in the country, Mendoza is the main producer, although Bonarda, Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah also stand out among its predominant varieties, as well as pink 'criolla' varieties (Cereza and Criolla Grande).

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

"A wine of an intense violet red colour that treasures aromas of great complexity, figs and ripe plums, harmoniously accompanied by notes of caramel and walnut. Rich on the palate, powerful, unctuous, with an extraordinary balance of alcohol, acidity and sugar that reaffirms the aromas perceived in the nose, together with all of the strength of the terroir (altitude, temperature range and sun). It reveals optimum persistence and a perfect assemblage with the Allier oak. All of the alcohol and sweetness comes entirely from the over-ripened grape."

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Belasco de Baquedano

Belasco de Baquedano is a leading winery located in the Mendoza region of Argentina. The winery is lucky enough to have very old vines of original Malbec vines first planted in 1910 - these old vines are the secret to Belasco De Baquedano's success. The old vines consistently produce wines that are full-bodied, juicy and complex with layers of flavour development.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Malbec

Malbec is probably best known as being the red grape variety behind the juicy, full-bodied red wines of Mendoza in Argentina. It is historically from the South-West of France in the region of Cahors. In both of these regions it produces single varietal wines which are loaded with black fruit flavours. 

 

--------THE REGION--------

Mendoza

In the center west of the territory, at the foot of the Andes mountain range, Mendoza holds 75% of the total vineyards in Argentina and the largest number of wineries in the country. This makes it the most important wine province and one of the main producing centres in the world.

The highest peaks of the Andes are found in Mendoza: with 22.832 ft, Aconcagua is the highest peak in America. The presence of the Andes, which act as a barrier to the humid winds of the Pacific, added to the distance to the Atlantic Ocean, shape the climate generating ideal conditions for the cultivation of vines. The altitude, continental climate, heterogeneity of soils and the snowmelt are key factors for the production of excellent wines, which add to a significant winemaking tradition.

The territory of Mendoza can be divided into five large sub-regions, which give the varieties their particular characteristics: Valle de Uco GI, integrated by the departments of Tunuyán, Tupungato and San Carlos; Primera Zona, which includes the departments of Luján de Cuyo and Maipú; the Northern oasis (Lavalle and Las Heras), the East (San Martín, Rivadavia, Junín, Santa Rosa and La Paz) and the South (San Rafael, Malargüe and General Alvear), covering practically the entire provincial geography.

The high degree of development achieved by viticulture, added to new research promoted by a generation of restless producers, has led to the identification of micro-regions with different terroirs, reflecting the diverse character of Argentine viticulture. It is specifically in Malbec where this quality is best appreciated.

With 20% of the total area of Malbec planted in the country, Mendoza is the main producer, although Bonarda, Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah also stand out among its predominant varieties, as well as pink 'criolla' varieties (Cereza and Criolla Grande).

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.