Bladnoch - 10YO Single Malt Scotch Whisky 46.7%

$125.00
Sale price

Regular price $125.00
A 10 year old single malt from Bladnoch, joining the series of releases the distillery has made since being bought in 2015 and restarting production in 2017. It was matured in bourbon casks, helping to bolster the sweetness and bring balance to the flavour profile's spicy malt base.

TASTING NOTES

Floral, honey, refreshing

COLOUR

Lemon gold

NOSE

Delicate floral with notes of honey and refreshing citrus

PALATE

Parma violets with fresh apples and hints of wood spice

FINISH

Sweet mouth coating leads to a refreshing finish

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Bladnoch Distillery

Bladnoch’s rich history dates back to 1817, when John and Thomas McClelland were first granted a licence to distil Whisky on their Bladnoch farm in Scotland’s Lowlands.

For nearly a century, successive generations of McClelland family grew and modernised the distillery. At its peak, the site had six washbacks and annual production of approximately 230,000 litres of alcohol, which cemented its status as the “Queen of the Lowlands”

1905

Over the next 80 years, Bladnoch Distillery changed hands several times and continued to produce fine Lowlands Whisky.

In 1956, Bladnoch Distillery Limited was created and the stills which had fallen silent during the war were recommissioned. The stillhouse was expanded to four stills in 1966.

More recently, the distillery was owned by Arthur Bell & Sons (which would later become part of Guinness / United Distillers) between 1983 and 1993, a period during which the brand’s distribution was increased and a Visitor Centre was established. From 1993, the distillery was privately owned by Raymond and Colin Armstrong.

Australian entrepreneur, David Prior acquired the company from Raymond and Colin Armstrong, and began an extensive refurbishment of the distillery.

After 2 years of renovations under the direction of Master Distiller, Ian MacMillan, Bladnoch Distillery resumed production. In 2017, Bladnoch celebrated its 200 year anniversary, making it one of the oldest and one of the largest privately owned Scotch Whisky distilleries.

Highly acclaimed Master Distiller, Dr Nick Savage joined the Bladnoch team. Bladnoch launched its state-of-the-art Visitor Centre experience, gift shop and Melba Cafe.

From one of the oldest Scotch Whisky distilleries comes a Single Malt reimagined. Bladnoch Distillery is our 203 year old home where we craft the finest Lowland Single Malt Scotch Whisky.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

A 10 year old single malt from Bladnoch, joining the series of releases the distillery has made since being bought in 2015 and restarting production in 2017. It was matured in bourbon casks, helping to bolster the sweetness and bring balance to the flavour profile's spicy malt base.

TASTING NOTES

Floral, honey, refreshing

COLOUR

Lemon gold

NOSE

Delicate floral with notes of honey and refreshing citrus

PALATE

Parma violets with fresh apples and hints of wood spice

FINISH

Sweet mouth coating leads to a refreshing finish

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Bladnoch Distillery

Bladnoch’s rich history dates back to 1817, when John and Thomas McClelland were first granted a licence to distil Whisky on their Bladnoch farm in Scotland’s Lowlands.

For nearly a century, successive generations of McClelland family grew and modernised the distillery. At its peak, the site had six washbacks and annual production of approximately 230,000 litres of alcohol, which cemented its status as the “Queen of the Lowlands”

1905

Over the next 80 years, Bladnoch Distillery changed hands several times and continued to produce fine Lowlands Whisky.

In 1956, Bladnoch Distillery Limited was created and the stills which had fallen silent during the war were recommissioned. The stillhouse was expanded to four stills in 1966.

More recently, the distillery was owned by Arthur Bell & Sons (which would later become part of Guinness / United Distillers) between 1983 and 1993, a period during which the brand’s distribution was increased and a Visitor Centre was established. From 1993, the distillery was privately owned by Raymond and Colin Armstrong.

Australian entrepreneur, David Prior acquired the company from Raymond and Colin Armstrong, and began an extensive refurbishment of the distillery.

After 2 years of renovations under the direction of Master Distiller, Ian MacMillan, Bladnoch Distillery resumed production. In 2017, Bladnoch celebrated its 200 year anniversary, making it one of the oldest and one of the largest privately owned Scotch Whisky distilleries.

Highly acclaimed Master Distiller, Dr Nick Savage joined the Bladnoch team. Bladnoch launched its state-of-the-art Visitor Centre experience, gift shop and Melba Cafe.

From one of the oldest Scotch Whisky distilleries comes a Single Malt reimagined. Bladnoch Distillery is our 203 year old home where we craft the finest Lowland Single Malt Scotch Whisky.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.