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Bodega Chacra - 'Mainque' Chardonnay 2018

$115.00
Sale price

Regular price $115.00

"Crafted in collaboration with Jean-Marc Roulot. Picked early as the grapes ripened early but maintained acidity. Fermented in barrel without malolactic, spending 11 months in barrique, this has an up-front fruit, a salinity shared with Chacra Chardonnay, and a tasty finish lent by the calcareous components of the alluvial soil.
Aged: 18% in concrete eggs, 25% in stainless steel tanks and 57% in French oak barrels (12% new) for 11 months."

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Bodega Chacra

Bodega Chacra was created by Piero Incisa della Rocchetta in 2004 with the intention of finding the most unobstructed expression of the climate, micro-climate, and terrior of Mainqué in the Río Negro region of Patagonia.
Respecting the environment by following biodynamic and organic principles, Piero strives to make wines that are transparent, pure, delicate, and floral with a strong minerality.

In Patagonia, a “chacra” is a special piece of land destined to pomology. At the same time, chacras are vital energy centres that provide us with the ability to connect with the whole universe, with everything living and vibrating. In its nourishment, in the marriage with every meal, wine is the companion of pleasure and sensitivity. Wine is intimate and touches all our senses. Chacra aims to enhance that connection.

Respecting and enhancing the community of Chacra is of the utmost importance. We preserve un-grafted old vines, invest in apiculture, and organically and bio-dynamically farm. We see Chacra wines as a consequence of nature and a reflection of our true respect for the ecosystem.

NATURE

The ultimate principle we follow at Chacra is a conscientious respect for the natural environment. Our organic approach seeks to preserve biodiversity and natural resources, with the least intervention of man possible. This is why all biodynamic preparations we use for our vineyards are made from the plants and animals of the very estate.

Birds
Great bustard
Black and white buff-necked ibis (bird of passage)
White-browed blackbird
March seedeater
Chimango caracara
Black-necked swan
Eurasian collared dove
Chalk-browed mockingbird
Rufous-bellied thrush
Hornero
Red-crested cardinal
Southern lapwing (common and widespread)
Great kiskadee
Martineta tinamou
Eagles
Herons
Ducks
Land animals
Wild boar
Geoffroy’s cat
European hare
Armadillos
Pichi (dwarf armadillo)
Weasel
Quiz
Nanny goats
Foxes

Aquatic animals
Carp
European perch
Patagonic silverside
Mojarras
Nutrias

Plants
Jarilla
Prosopis
Sampa
Chañar – also brea - (prickly)
Coirón (Gramineae)
Olivillo tree (prickly tree)

--------THE GRAPE--------

Chardonnay

Chardonnay

--------THE REGION--------

Patagonia

The Río Negro originates from the junction of two meltwater rivers, Limay and Neuquén, and then crosses the stepped plains of the province through a forest about 3 kilometers (1.9 mi) long at the Alto Valle, a 75-mile-long, 5-mile-wide stretch along the river. The elevation at the valley is between 290 meters (952ft.) and 330 meters above sea level.

In the 1820s, British colonists dug irrigation channels on both sides of the river, forming a green belt suitable for agriculture. Soils at the river banks are mainly acidic, sandy loams and silty loams, while in the dry plain, extensive gravel mantels known as ‘Rodados Patagónicos’ or ‘Patagonian Shingle Formation’ can be found.

A high iron concentration before the Río Negro produces heavy red clay soils in the “Mainqué” area. Another part of the estate is encompassed by “barda” soils: eroded steep slopes with scarce vegetation.

CLIMATE

Winds are mainly from the southeast quadrant. They grow cold in winter, reaching -5°C (23°F) due to the snow that covers the Andes, but become less cold the rest of the year, with temperatures ranging from 10°C (50°F) to 35°C (95°F). In addition, these winds are characteristically dry in the region, as the uplift of air masses through the Andes produces
precipitation, eliminating the humidity swept along from the Pacific. The rain shadow effect and descending cool mountain air make the desert quite windy as well; gusts of wind can reach 44mph. Poor precipitations also contribute to aridity: averages of annual rainfall in the area range from 150mm (5.9 in) to 200 mm (7.88in) per year.  

As a result, soil genetic horizons are quite drained and have poor organic matter, but these conditions contribute to the health of the crops in the High Valley, while growers are able to control the water intake through irrigation.

Classic desert conditions of warm days and cold nights extend the growing season and slow the ripening of grapes. The combination of high winds, constant sun, little rainfall, and alluvial soils tend to yield smaller and thicker grapes, leading to high concentrations of sugar and natural acidity.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

"Crafted in collaboration with Jean-Marc Roulot. Picked early as the grapes ripened early but maintained acidity. Fermented in barrel without malolactic, spending 11 months in barrique, this has an up-front fruit, a salinity shared with Chacra Chardonnay, and a tasty finish lent by the calcareous components of the alluvial soil.
Aged: 18% in concrete eggs, 25% in stainless steel tanks and 57% in French oak barrels (12% new) for 11 months."

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Bodega Chacra

Bodega Chacra was created by Piero Incisa della Rocchetta in 2004 with the intention of finding the most unobstructed expression of the climate, micro-climate, and terrior of Mainqué in the Río Negro region of Patagonia.
Respecting the environment by following biodynamic and organic principles, Piero strives to make wines that are transparent, pure, delicate, and floral with a strong minerality.

In Patagonia, a “chacra” is a special piece of land destined to pomology. At the same time, chacras are vital energy centres that provide us with the ability to connect with the whole universe, with everything living and vibrating. In its nourishment, in the marriage with every meal, wine is the companion of pleasure and sensitivity. Wine is intimate and touches all our senses. Chacra aims to enhance that connection.

Respecting and enhancing the community of Chacra is of the utmost importance. We preserve un-grafted old vines, invest in apiculture, and organically and bio-dynamically farm. We see Chacra wines as a consequence of nature and a reflection of our true respect for the ecosystem.

NATURE

The ultimate principle we follow at Chacra is a conscientious respect for the natural environment. Our organic approach seeks to preserve biodiversity and natural resources, with the least intervention of man possible. This is why all biodynamic preparations we use for our vineyards are made from the plants and animals of the very estate.

Birds
Great bustard
Black and white buff-necked ibis (bird of passage)
White-browed blackbird
March seedeater
Chimango caracara
Black-necked swan
Eurasian collared dove
Chalk-browed mockingbird
Rufous-bellied thrush
Hornero
Red-crested cardinal
Southern lapwing (common and widespread)
Great kiskadee
Martineta tinamou
Eagles
Herons
Ducks
Land animals
Wild boar
Geoffroy’s cat
European hare
Armadillos
Pichi (dwarf armadillo)
Weasel
Quiz
Nanny goats
Foxes

Aquatic animals
Carp
European perch
Patagonic silverside
Mojarras
Nutrias

Plants
Jarilla
Prosopis
Sampa
Chañar – also brea - (prickly)
Coirón (Gramineae)
Olivillo tree (prickly tree)

--------THE GRAPE--------

Chardonnay

Chardonnay

--------THE REGION--------

Patagonia

The Río Negro originates from the junction of two meltwater rivers, Limay and Neuquén, and then crosses the stepped plains of the province through a forest about 3 kilometers (1.9 mi) long at the Alto Valle, a 75-mile-long, 5-mile-wide stretch along the river. The elevation at the valley is between 290 meters (952ft.) and 330 meters above sea level.

In the 1820s, British colonists dug irrigation channels on both sides of the river, forming a green belt suitable for agriculture. Soils at the river banks are mainly acidic, sandy loams and silty loams, while in the dry plain, extensive gravel mantels known as ‘Rodados Patagónicos’ or ‘Patagonian Shingle Formation’ can be found.

A high iron concentration before the Río Negro produces heavy red clay soils in the “Mainqué” area. Another part of the estate is encompassed by “barda” soils: eroded steep slopes with scarce vegetation.

CLIMATE

Winds are mainly from the southeast quadrant. They grow cold in winter, reaching -5°C (23°F) due to the snow that covers the Andes, but become less cold the rest of the year, with temperatures ranging from 10°C (50°F) to 35°C (95°F). In addition, these winds are characteristically dry in the region, as the uplift of air masses through the Andes produces
precipitation, eliminating the humidity swept along from the Pacific. The rain shadow effect and descending cool mountain air make the desert quite windy as well; gusts of wind can reach 44mph. Poor precipitations also contribute to aridity: averages of annual rainfall in the area range from 150mm (5.9 in) to 200 mm (7.88in) per year.  

As a result, soil genetic horizons are quite drained and have poor organic matter, but these conditions contribute to the health of the crops in the High Valley, while growers are able to control the water intake through irrigation.

Classic desert conditions of warm days and cold nights extend the growing season and slow the ripening of grapes. The combination of high winds, constant sun, little rainfall, and alluvial soils tend to yield smaller and thicker grapes, leading to high concentrations of sugar and natural acidity.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.