Brokenwood - 'Graveyard Vineyard' Shiraz 2018

$330.00
Sale price

Regular price $330.00

Bright mid density colour with purple hues just adding to the appeal. The use of large format French oak allows the red spice and bramble fruit of Hunter Shiraz to shine. Initial palate is very supple and complete, giving a lovely flow from start to finish. The importance of acidity can never be underestimated as this underpins the structure and carry. An impressive wine, which is a great follow on from the 2018 vintage. Subtle but powerful.

The Langton's Classification of Australian Wine was first released in 1991 and honoured the Graveyard Vineyard Shiraz with 'Outstanding'. The Graveyard Vineyard Shiraz remains the only Hunter Valley Shiraz in the Classification and was elevated to the highest category of ‘Exceptional’ and has remained for each release since.

Vineyard Notes
Processing started with a 3 day cold soak, then a 5-6 day ferment at 24-26C. The vineyard is on heavy clay soil which gives great fruit concentration with tannin structure and direction. The oak regime for this wine is 100% French, no new oak.
Winemaker Comments
Hunter Valley winemakers had the rare joy of 2 consecutive dry vintages when the grapes of 2018 started coming off the vines. The hot vintage of 2018 ended with 100mm of rain in February and then 120mm in March. Our usual dry winter prevailed and then a small amount of Spring/early Summer rain. The temperatures started to rise in late December hitting 39C on 29th signalling a very hot New Year. In a flash back to early February 2017, there was a run of days, 15th to 19th, of over 40C and the month closed out with 43.5C on the 26th. The old vines of Graveyard were harvested in the second week of February in pristine condition. An effortless high quality vintage.
Food Pairing
Pairs well with Osso bucco or slow roasted lamb shoulder.

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Brokenwood

Established in 1970, Brokenwood Wines has evolved from a weekend venture for self-professed hobby winemakers into one of Australia’s most reputable wine labels.

Brokenwood was founded by a trio of Sydney-based solicitors, Tony Albert, John Beeston and James Halliday, who paid a then record price of $970 per acre for a 10-acre block in the foothills of the Brokenback Ranges. The original block was destined to be a cricket ground for the local community but was instead planted with Cabernet Sauvignon and Shiraz.

The first vintage was picked in 1973 and while none of the original partners claimed to know anything about viticulture, the wine received praise, and attracted a loyal following from the first vintage.

It was a labour of love for the partners, and the friends and family they conscripted to help who were seduced by the promise of clean country air, fine wine, food and company in exchange for help on the vineyard. Everyone pitched in to pick the grapes which were carried to the winery in buckets in the back seat of Len Evans’ Bentley.  Weary bodies were put up in dorm-style accommodation which still remains today.

In 1975, a new winery was built to accommodate the growing production. Visitors helped themselves to a taste of the very limited and eagerly sought after boutique wine made by the weekend winemakers from a table standing in the shade of the first floor balcony.

Many of Australia’s most prominent wine identities ‘did their time’ in the vineyards at Brokenwood during the seventies.

Growth was steady until the boom of 1978, when six new partners joined, allowing the purchase of the next door Graveyard Vineyard. Originally destined to be a cemetery for the Parish of Pokolbin, it was never used as such and instead planted with Shiraz & Cabernet Sauvignon.

The heavy clay soil resulted in vintages of low yield, but with extraordinary concentration of flavour in the berries, providing a distinctive wine style that is still evident in the Brokenwood red wines. The Graveyard Vineyard Shiraz is Brokenwood’s flagship wine, which is still sourced exclusively from this one vineyard.

In the same year, Brokenwood sourced fruit from outside the Hunter Valley for the first time – Cabernet Sauvignon from Coonawarra, which was blended with Hunter fruit to make a premium red, creating the style that has been synonymous with Brokenwood for the last 20 years.

In 1982, the company extended its range to include white wines, notably the jewel of the Hunter Valley, Semillon. With this broadened scope, the partners decided to consolidate further growth with a Chief Winemaker/Managing Director.

Iain Riggs joined Brokenwood in 1982, introducing new winery equipment and facilities specifically for premium white wine production. Brokenwood was now capable of producing high quality white wine, which, since 1983, has been a significant part of its total production.

Brokenwood’s single vineyard philosophy has grown to capture the essence of our premium sites throughout Australia. The first single vineyard selection for the Graveyard Vineyard was in 1983. Since then our Graveyard Vineyard Shiraz has gained considerable international recognition. The Langton’s Classification of Australian Wine has it as the highest rated Hunter Valley red wine, listed as ‘Exceptional’.

The first, and only, vineyard manager is appointed - Keith (KB) Barry, in 1991. The Cricket Pitch label is extended with the return of a red wine, the 1991 Merlot Cabernet Sauvignon.

In 1995, The first Rayner Vineyard Shiraz, the 1993, is released and wins the Restaurant and Catering Trophy at Royal Sydney Wine Show for Best Wine from a Small Producer.

In 1997, the first ILR Aged Semillon is released (the 1992).

Brokenwood initiates the prize for Dux of Second Year at the University of Adelaide winemaking degree course. The first recipient is Michael Sykes.

The year of 2003 saw Brokenwood's Semillon win Trophy for Best Australian White Varietal under £10, and Best International Dry White under £10 at the inaugural Decanter World Wine Awards. Iain Riggs is presented with the Graham Gregory Award for services to the New South Wales wine industry and Brokenwood releases the first wines from the Indigo Vineyard, Beechworth.

The new barrel shed is completed in 2004, allowing high quality controlled maturation for whites and reds, and greatly expanded party space.The last chardonnay vines receive their marching orders from the Graveyard. The vineyard is now entirely planted to shiraz.

Brokenwood completes the move from cork to screwcap closures.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Shiraz

 

 

--------THE REGION--------

Hunter Valley

The Hunter Valley is Australia’s oldest viticultural area, dating back to 1847. Located inland from Newcastle in New South Wales, the region’s loamy vineyards are located at between 100 and 240 metres above sea level. Sémillon, Chardonnay and Shiraz are favoured, the finest Sémillon having an almost limey, hay-like purity with an incredible ageing ability.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

Bright mid density colour with purple hues just adding to the appeal. The use of large format French oak allows the red spice and bramble fruit of Hunter Shiraz to shine. Initial palate is very supple and complete, giving a lovely flow from start to finish. The importance of acidity can never be underestimated as this underpins the structure and carry. An impressive wine, which is a great follow on from the 2018 vintage. Subtle but powerful.

The Langton's Classification of Australian Wine was first released in 1991 and honoured the Graveyard Vineyard Shiraz with 'Outstanding'. The Graveyard Vineyard Shiraz remains the only Hunter Valley Shiraz in the Classification and was elevated to the highest category of ‘Exceptional’ and has remained for each release since.

Vineyard Notes
Processing started with a 3 day cold soak, then a 5-6 day ferment at 24-26C. The vineyard is on heavy clay soil which gives great fruit concentration with tannin structure and direction. The oak regime for this wine is 100% French, no new oak.
Winemaker Comments
Hunter Valley winemakers had the rare joy of 2 consecutive dry vintages when the grapes of 2018 started coming off the vines. The hot vintage of 2018 ended with 100mm of rain in February and then 120mm in March. Our usual dry winter prevailed and then a small amount of Spring/early Summer rain. The temperatures started to rise in late December hitting 39C on 29th signalling a very hot New Year. In a flash back to early February 2017, there was a run of days, 15th to 19th, of over 40C and the month closed out with 43.5C on the 26th. The old vines of Graveyard were harvested in the second week of February in pristine condition. An effortless high quality vintage.
Food Pairing
Pairs well with Osso bucco or slow roasted lamb shoulder.

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Brokenwood

Established in 1970, Brokenwood Wines has evolved from a weekend venture for self-professed hobby winemakers into one of Australia’s most reputable wine labels.

Brokenwood was founded by a trio of Sydney-based solicitors, Tony Albert, John Beeston and James Halliday, who paid a then record price of $970 per acre for a 10-acre block in the foothills of the Brokenback Ranges. The original block was destined to be a cricket ground for the local community but was instead planted with Cabernet Sauvignon and Shiraz.

The first vintage was picked in 1973 and while none of the original partners claimed to know anything about viticulture, the wine received praise, and attracted a loyal following from the first vintage.

It was a labour of love for the partners, and the friends and family they conscripted to help who were seduced by the promise of clean country air, fine wine, food and company in exchange for help on the vineyard. Everyone pitched in to pick the grapes which were carried to the winery in buckets in the back seat of Len Evans’ Bentley.  Weary bodies were put up in dorm-style accommodation which still remains today.

In 1975, a new winery was built to accommodate the growing production. Visitors helped themselves to a taste of the very limited and eagerly sought after boutique wine made by the weekend winemakers from a table standing in the shade of the first floor balcony.

Many of Australia’s most prominent wine identities ‘did their time’ in the vineyards at Brokenwood during the seventies.

Growth was steady until the boom of 1978, when six new partners joined, allowing the purchase of the next door Graveyard Vineyard. Originally destined to be a cemetery for the Parish of Pokolbin, it was never used as such and instead planted with Shiraz & Cabernet Sauvignon.

The heavy clay soil resulted in vintages of low yield, but with extraordinary concentration of flavour in the berries, providing a distinctive wine style that is still evident in the Brokenwood red wines. The Graveyard Vineyard Shiraz is Brokenwood’s flagship wine, which is still sourced exclusively from this one vineyard.

In the same year, Brokenwood sourced fruit from outside the Hunter Valley for the first time – Cabernet Sauvignon from Coonawarra, which was blended with Hunter fruit to make a premium red, creating the style that has been synonymous with Brokenwood for the last 20 years.

In 1982, the company extended its range to include white wines, notably the jewel of the Hunter Valley, Semillon. With this broadened scope, the partners decided to consolidate further growth with a Chief Winemaker/Managing Director.

Iain Riggs joined Brokenwood in 1982, introducing new winery equipment and facilities specifically for premium white wine production. Brokenwood was now capable of producing high quality white wine, which, since 1983, has been a significant part of its total production.

Brokenwood’s single vineyard philosophy has grown to capture the essence of our premium sites throughout Australia. The first single vineyard selection for the Graveyard Vineyard was in 1983. Since then our Graveyard Vineyard Shiraz has gained considerable international recognition. The Langton’s Classification of Australian Wine has it as the highest rated Hunter Valley red wine, listed as ‘Exceptional’.

The first, and only, vineyard manager is appointed - Keith (KB) Barry, in 1991. The Cricket Pitch label is extended with the return of a red wine, the 1991 Merlot Cabernet Sauvignon.

In 1995, The first Rayner Vineyard Shiraz, the 1993, is released and wins the Restaurant and Catering Trophy at Royal Sydney Wine Show for Best Wine from a Small Producer.

In 1997, the first ILR Aged Semillon is released (the 1992).

Brokenwood initiates the prize for Dux of Second Year at the University of Adelaide winemaking degree course. The first recipient is Michael Sykes.

The year of 2003 saw Brokenwood's Semillon win Trophy for Best Australian White Varietal under £10, and Best International Dry White under £10 at the inaugural Decanter World Wine Awards. Iain Riggs is presented with the Graham Gregory Award for services to the New South Wales wine industry and Brokenwood releases the first wines from the Indigo Vineyard, Beechworth.

The new barrel shed is completed in 2004, allowing high quality controlled maturation for whites and reds, and greatly expanded party space.The last chardonnay vines receive their marching orders from the Graveyard. The vineyard is now entirely planted to shiraz.

Brokenwood completes the move from cork to screwcap closures.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Shiraz

 

 

--------THE REGION--------

Hunter Valley

The Hunter Valley is Australia’s oldest viticultural area, dating back to 1847. Located inland from Newcastle in New South Wales, the region’s loamy vineyards are located at between 100 and 240 metres above sea level. Sémillon, Chardonnay and Shiraz are favoured, the finest Sémillon having an almost limey, hay-like purity with an incredible ageing ability.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.