Bruichladdich - Octomore 08.2 "Masterclass" Islay Single Malt Scotch Whisky

$336.00
Sale price

Regular price $336.00

 Initiation brings provocation. All of the opulent spirit in Octomore 08.2 spent the first six years of its life in one of three different styles of wine cask. French Mourvedre – a red wine grape that has a reputation for producing intense red fruit, and strong, earthy, even gamey flavours. Austrian sweet wines – full bodied and charming with an ability to challenge convention with innovative techniques. French Sauternes – casks from the Graves section in Bordeaux that previously held some of the most revered and exclusive dessert wines the world has ever seen.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Bruichladdich

Bruichladdich (pronounced Brook-laddie), meaning 'bank on the shore', was built in 1881 on the edge of Loch Indaal on the most westerly point of Islay. The story of Octomore is that when the newly-resurrected Bruichladdich was elbowed out of their malt supply at Diageo’s Port Ellen maltings (which didn’t want to handle their low-volume orders), whisky industry legend Jim McEwan sourced peated malt from Bairds Maltings in Inverness. While visiting, he discovered that Bairds was doing their malting the old-fashioned way: using a giant open-air outdoor peat fire. Modern maltings don’t do this, because it’s extremely variable. One windy day during the drying process will cause the peat levels to plummet, and no matter what the weather the final product is often way over the requested ppm (parts per million) peat levels requested by the distilleries who, as we all know, love their consistency. To combat this variability Bairds blends the heavily-peated barley with unpeated malt to hit the numbers specified by his customers. Jim asked whether anyone was distilling the uncut stuff, and was told that nobody would want to do that because it would be undrinkable. Anyone who has ever met Jim knows that could only be taken as a challenge. Instead of the 40 ppm malt he went there to buy (for the Port Charlotte brand, Bruichladdich’s peated line) he came home with 131 ppm. Luckily, Bruichladdich’s stills are unusually tall and narrow and this causes the resulting spirit to be very light — all of the heavier phenols that we associate with “heavily peated” whisky fail to climb that high and never make it into the heart cut. So while it’s true that 80 – 300 ppm malt would be undrinkable from anyone else’s stills, from the stills at Bruichladdich it comes out downright elegant and fruity. All Jim had to do was mature it just long enough in oak to mellow the alcohols and then bottle it at cask strength (later, he started mixing in just a little of Octomore Farm’s crystal clear spring water) and Octomore was born.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

 Initiation brings provocation. All of the opulent spirit in Octomore 08.2 spent the first six years of its life in one of three different styles of wine cask. French Mourvedre – a red wine grape that has a reputation for producing intense red fruit, and strong, earthy, even gamey flavours. Austrian sweet wines – full bodied and charming with an ability to challenge convention with innovative techniques. French Sauternes – casks from the Graves section in Bordeaux that previously held some of the most revered and exclusive dessert wines the world has ever seen.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Bruichladdich

Bruichladdich (pronounced Brook-laddie), meaning 'bank on the shore', was built in 1881 on the edge of Loch Indaal on the most westerly point of Islay. The story of Octomore is that when the newly-resurrected Bruichladdich was elbowed out of their malt supply at Diageo’s Port Ellen maltings (which didn’t want to handle their low-volume orders), whisky industry legend Jim McEwan sourced peated malt from Bairds Maltings in Inverness. While visiting, he discovered that Bairds was doing their malting the old-fashioned way: using a giant open-air outdoor peat fire. Modern maltings don’t do this, because it’s extremely variable. One windy day during the drying process will cause the peat levels to plummet, and no matter what the weather the final product is often way over the requested ppm (parts per million) peat levels requested by the distilleries who, as we all know, love their consistency. To combat this variability Bairds blends the heavily-peated barley with unpeated malt to hit the numbers specified by his customers. Jim asked whether anyone was distilling the uncut stuff, and was told that nobody would want to do that because it would be undrinkable. Anyone who has ever met Jim knows that could only be taken as a challenge. Instead of the 40 ppm malt he went there to buy (for the Port Charlotte brand, Bruichladdich’s peated line) he came home with 131 ppm. Luckily, Bruichladdich’s stills are unusually tall and narrow and this causes the resulting spirit to be very light — all of the heavier phenols that we associate with “heavily peated” whisky fail to climb that high and never make it into the heart cut. So while it’s true that 80 – 300 ppm malt would be undrinkable from anyone else’s stills, from the stills at Bruichladdich it comes out downright elegant and fruity. All Jim had to do was mature it just long enough in oak to mellow the alcohols and then bottle it at cask strength (later, he started mixing in just a little of Octomore Farm’s crystal clear spring water) and Octomore was born.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.