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Ketel 1 - Jenever

$55.00
Sale price

Regular price $55.00

Ketel 1 Jenever is made from the best rye, wheat, corn and a secret mixture of herbs and spices. Ketel 1 Jenever matures in oak barrels for a short time to unfold its full aroma. Its taste profile is mild, sweetish, fine, elegant and clearly structured.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

NOLET FAMILY DISTILLERY

The history of Nolet Distillery goes back more than 325 years; a rich history that still defines our success with each passing day. This success stems from cherishing traditions and from the fact that every Nolet generation has the courage to look ahead and beyond.

Nolet Distillery was born and raised in Schiedam. Joannes Nolet settled in the midst of the granaries in 1691. Now, more than 325 years later, Nolet Distillery is still at home in the town where Dutch gin production reached its height in the 18th and primarily the 19th centuries. Schiedam, the birthplace of Nolet Distillery, is still where our heart lies and where we operate from.  With this local involvement, we support local initiatives and have facilitated the creation of the Ketel Factory, a project space for visual artists.

The rich history of Nolet Distillery is based on skills, combined with craftsmanship and vision. Centuries of experience and intense devotion have given us a vision far beyond the horizon. In the 1970s, Carel Nolet applied this craftsmanship and vision to conjure KETEL1 Jenever into existence. He went on to conquer America with Ketel One Vodka. Inspiration, passed from father to son across the generations, can be seen wherever you look: in our delicious recipes and novel production methods or our global sales and marketing approach with the personal touch. Carel Nolet continues to innovate, alongside his sons Carel Jr. and Bob. Every day, Nolet Distillery continues to build on the family’s success with skill, passion and vision.


The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

Ketel 1 Jenever is made from the best rye, wheat, corn and a secret mixture of herbs and spices. Ketel 1 Jenever matures in oak barrels for a short time to unfold its full aroma. Its taste profile is mild, sweetish, fine, elegant and clearly structured.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

NOLET FAMILY DISTILLERY

The history of Nolet Distillery goes back more than 325 years; a rich history that still defines our success with each passing day. This success stems from cherishing traditions and from the fact that every Nolet generation has the courage to look ahead and beyond.

Nolet Distillery was born and raised in Schiedam. Joannes Nolet settled in the midst of the granaries in 1691. Now, more than 325 years later, Nolet Distillery is still at home in the town where Dutch gin production reached its height in the 18th and primarily the 19th centuries. Schiedam, the birthplace of Nolet Distillery, is still where our heart lies and where we operate from.  With this local involvement, we support local initiatives and have facilitated the creation of the Ketel Factory, a project space for visual artists.

The rich history of Nolet Distillery is based on skills, combined with craftsmanship and vision. Centuries of experience and intense devotion have given us a vision far beyond the horizon. In the 1970s, Carel Nolet applied this craftsmanship and vision to conjure KETEL1 Jenever into existence. He went on to conquer America with Ketel One Vodka. Inspiration, passed from father to son across the generations, can be seen wherever you look: in our delicious recipes and novel production methods or our global sales and marketing approach with the personal touch. Carel Nolet continues to innovate, alongside his sons Carel Jr. and Bob. Every day, Nolet Distillery continues to build on the family’s success with skill, passion and vision.


The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.