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Cambridge Road - 'The Naturalist Blanc' 2021

$40.00
Sale price

Regular price $40.00

This new Naturalist Blanc is a first for us.
It is driven by the fine acidity of a lovely local
Sauvignon Blanc and filled out by the richness
of Marsanne from the glorious Millton Vineyard
in Gisbourne.
Enjoy this unique take on NZ wine anytime in
the next 3 years.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Cambridge Road

​Cambridge Road Vineyard is a small family farmed estate established in 1986. We focus our time and energy on perfecting and beautifying our land and cultivating it according to natural biodynamic and eco-farming principles. We believe in minimal intervention winemaking, low yields, and healthy living wines. We seek purity of voice in all our wines with a respect for the taste of place. We source organic fruit from other vineyards within the region and occasionally further afield to offer a wider selection of taste.

--------THE REGION--------

Martinborough

The Martinborough wine region is located in the southern point of the North Island of New Zealand. Martinborough though a small wine district in size, it makes up for this in quality and style of wines crafted. The wines clearly reflect their unique blend of topography, ancient geology, climate and human endeavours. Distinctively boutique; the wines from Martinborough achieve international acclaim for intensity of flavour - old world style with new world flair - creating superb hand-crafted wines.
Early settler’s planted vines in 1883 - falling victim to the temperance movement in 1905. Martinborough’s modern wine history dates from the late 1970’s with plantings by producers Dry River, Martinborough Vineyard, Ata Rangi and Chifney which is now Margrain Vineyard. 
The Martinborough wine region is actually one of three fine wine sub-regions of the Wairarapa; linked by the power of the Ruamahanga River which flows from the Tararua mountains to Palliser Bay. Meeting Lake Wairarapa, which inspired the region’s Maori name, meaning Glistening Waters. A semi-maritime climate sheltered by the westerly Tararua Ranges, and exposed to strong, devigorating southerly winds. Martinborough experiences cool springs and autumns plus hot summers with cool nights: this combination of pronounced diurnal differences and a long growing season results in intense varietal character and complexity.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

This new Naturalist Blanc is a first for us.
It is driven by the fine acidity of a lovely local
Sauvignon Blanc and filled out by the richness
of Marsanne from the glorious Millton Vineyard
in Gisbourne.
Enjoy this unique take on NZ wine anytime in
the next 3 years.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Cambridge Road

​Cambridge Road Vineyard is a small family farmed estate established in 1986. We focus our time and energy on perfecting and beautifying our land and cultivating it according to natural biodynamic and eco-farming principles. We believe in minimal intervention winemaking, low yields, and healthy living wines. We seek purity of voice in all our wines with a respect for the taste of place. We source organic fruit from other vineyards within the region and occasionally further afield to offer a wider selection of taste.

--------THE REGION--------

Martinborough

The Martinborough wine region is located in the southern point of the North Island of New Zealand. Martinborough though a small wine district in size, it makes up for this in quality and style of wines crafted. The wines clearly reflect their unique blend of topography, ancient geology, climate and human endeavours. Distinctively boutique; the wines from Martinborough achieve international acclaim for intensity of flavour - old world style with new world flair - creating superb hand-crafted wines.
Early settler’s planted vines in 1883 - falling victim to the temperance movement in 1905. Martinborough’s modern wine history dates from the late 1970’s with plantings by producers Dry River, Martinborough Vineyard, Ata Rangi and Chifney which is now Margrain Vineyard. 
The Martinborough wine region is actually one of three fine wine sub-regions of the Wairarapa; linked by the power of the Ruamahanga River which flows from the Tararua mountains to Palliser Bay. Meeting Lake Wairarapa, which inspired the region’s Maori name, meaning Glistening Waters. A semi-maritime climate sheltered by the westerly Tararua Ranges, and exposed to strong, devigorating southerly winds. Martinborough experiences cool springs and autumns plus hot summers with cool nights: this combination of pronounced diurnal differences and a long growing season results in intense varietal character and complexity.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.