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Domaine Philippe Livera - Gevrey Chambertin 'En Champs' 2016

$115.00
Sale price

Regular price $115.00

"VINEYARDS: ‘En Champs’ is found just underneath premier cru ‘Champeaux,’ on the border with the village of Brochon. Here the soil is thin, and the “mother rock” of Burgundy (pure limestone) reaches the surface. AGE OF VINES: 40 to 50 years, on average.

WINEMAKING: Hand-harvested. Grapes are destemmed and fermented on indigenous yeasts in tank. Aged in French oak barrels, with approximately 40% new barrels. Bottled unfined and unfiltered.

TASTING IMPRESSIONS: Aromas of black and white pepper, red berries and licorice. Refined and mineral, with medium tannins.

PAIRING SUGGESTIONS: Roast lamb; beef in sauce; truffled dishes"

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Domaine Philippe Livera

The family’s honest approach to winemaking for us was a revelation, when we first met this native Gevrey clan more than two decades ago. Their ancient, ice-cold cellar (where barrels of wine share space with homemade saucisson) and the faded pictures of family members in the vineyards over the ancient hearth give you a sense of just how connected the Liveras are with the rugged beauty and generations-deep winemaking traditions of Gevrey.

Today Damien Livera is at the helm, the fourth generation of Livera winemakers in Gevrey, and has quickly established himself as one of the top young winemakers in the Côte de Nuits. So much so that we have to fight hard each vintage to secure the wines we want, in competition with locals who have finally discovered this impeccable source of authentic Gevrey wines.

What sets the Liveras apart is their attention to Gevrey’s collection of unique terroirs. To a one, the family’s villages-level vineyards are natural extensions of premier cru plots; and as such these wines overachieve every vintage, with fine tannins and rich textures, not to mention an uncanny ability to age far above their station.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir produces some of the world's most expensive, most lauded, rarest and delicious wines. Equally it is one of the most difficult grapes to grow successfully and as a result it is quite hard to make a balanced Pinot Noir. It is historically from Burgundy, most specifically in the Cote de Nuits, so much so that people will refer to Pinot Noir as a 'Burgundy'

 

--------THE REGION--------

Burgundy

Burgundy is one of the most important wine regions in the world. It is often the one region that winemakers not lucky enough to be based there strive to make wine in. Run over to your local winery and I am sure that you'll find at least one Burgundy-phile. It is the historical home of the two major grapes: Pinot Noir and Chardonnay. 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

"VINEYARDS: ‘En Champs’ is found just underneath premier cru ‘Champeaux,’ on the border with the village of Brochon. Here the soil is thin, and the “mother rock” of Burgundy (pure limestone) reaches the surface. AGE OF VINES: 40 to 50 years, on average.

WINEMAKING: Hand-harvested. Grapes are destemmed and fermented on indigenous yeasts in tank. Aged in French oak barrels, with approximately 40% new barrels. Bottled unfined and unfiltered.

TASTING IMPRESSIONS: Aromas of black and white pepper, red berries and licorice. Refined and mineral, with medium tannins.

PAIRING SUGGESTIONS: Roast lamb; beef in sauce; truffled dishes"

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Domaine Philippe Livera

The family’s honest approach to winemaking for us was a revelation, when we first met this native Gevrey clan more than two decades ago. Their ancient, ice-cold cellar (where barrels of wine share space with homemade saucisson) and the faded pictures of family members in the vineyards over the ancient hearth give you a sense of just how connected the Liveras are with the rugged beauty and generations-deep winemaking traditions of Gevrey.

Today Damien Livera is at the helm, the fourth generation of Livera winemakers in Gevrey, and has quickly established himself as one of the top young winemakers in the Côte de Nuits. So much so that we have to fight hard each vintage to secure the wines we want, in competition with locals who have finally discovered this impeccable source of authentic Gevrey wines.

What sets the Liveras apart is their attention to Gevrey’s collection of unique terroirs. To a one, the family’s villages-level vineyards are natural extensions of premier cru plots; and as such these wines overachieve every vintage, with fine tannins and rich textures, not to mention an uncanny ability to age far above their station.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir produces some of the world's most expensive, most lauded, rarest and delicious wines. Equally it is one of the most difficult grapes to grow successfully and as a result it is quite hard to make a balanced Pinot Noir. It is historically from Burgundy, most specifically in the Cote de Nuits, so much so that people will refer to Pinot Noir as a 'Burgundy'

 

--------THE REGION--------

Burgundy

Burgundy is one of the most important wine regions in the world. It is often the one region that winemakers not lucky enough to be based there strive to make wine in. Run over to your local winery and I am sure that you'll find at least one Burgundy-phile. It is the historical home of the two major grapes: Pinot Noir and Chardonnay. 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.