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Baron Otard - 'VSOP' Cognac

$95.00
Sale price

Regular price $95.00

Eye: Gorgeously glowing amber gold.

Nose: A strong, floral nose, with notes of lime and pears.

Palate: The bouquet alternates between mild and floral nuances. Pears, vanilla, lime leaves and oak wood create a wonderful and extremely individual character, which reaches its climax with spices and rough, earthy tobacco.

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Château Royal de Cognac

The Château Royal de Cognac passed into the hands of a certain Baron Otard in 1795, and thus escaped destruction during the dark days of the French Revolution. The Baron was instantly taken by the site, its unique heritage and the exceptional ageing conditions for its eaux de vie (a clear, colourless fruit spirit) provided by the château's thick walls. Today, you can explore this unique place and home of the Baron Otard cognac house with a visit to the historic cellars and rooms built in a variety of architectural styles. 

Baron Otard continues this tradition of hospitality, organising seminars, gala dinners and marriages within the château's walls. Owned by the Bacardi-Martini group (Bombay Sapphire gin, Grey Goose vodka, and others), the château is filled with a range of fragrances, from orange peel to dried apricot. A series of experiences are available to uncover more of the château’s past, such as the Prestige experience, which ends with a tasting of a VSOP and XO Gold cognac. Or bottle your own cognac – the Héritage Royal, a deluxe XO! – on the Heritage experience, and add your own personalised label. Perhaps the perfect Christmas gift?

love what they do; making craft whisky for the modern enthusiast. After a few years mucking about on a home still and learning as much as we could about whisky  they began the Thomson Whisky project as Independent Bottlers. They got hold of a few barrels of aged single malt from Willowbank Distillery, Dunedin, carefully selected to their personal tastes, to launch under the Thomson name. They started telling people about their whisky, sharing a drink with friends, then bartenders, and shops and people travelling overseas and their project started firing. A few years down the road and things have changed a lot. They are now distilling themselves like mad out in West Auckland.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

Eye: Gorgeously glowing amber gold.

Nose: A strong, floral nose, with notes of lime and pears.

Palate: The bouquet alternates between mild and floral nuances. Pears, vanilla, lime leaves and oak wood create a wonderful and extremely individual character, which reaches its climax with spices and rough, earthy tobacco.

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Château Royal de Cognac

The Château Royal de Cognac passed into the hands of a certain Baron Otard in 1795, and thus escaped destruction during the dark days of the French Revolution. The Baron was instantly taken by the site, its unique heritage and the exceptional ageing conditions for its eaux de vie (a clear, colourless fruit spirit) provided by the château's thick walls. Today, you can explore this unique place and home of the Baron Otard cognac house with a visit to the historic cellars and rooms built in a variety of architectural styles. 

Baron Otard continues this tradition of hospitality, organising seminars, gala dinners and marriages within the château's walls. Owned by the Bacardi-Martini group (Bombay Sapphire gin, Grey Goose vodka, and others), the château is filled with a range of fragrances, from orange peel to dried apricot. A series of experiences are available to uncover more of the château’s past, such as the Prestige experience, which ends with a tasting of a VSOP and XO Gold cognac. Or bottle your own cognac – the Héritage Royal, a deluxe XO! – on the Heritage experience, and add your own personalised label. Perhaps the perfect Christmas gift?

love what they do; making craft whisky for the modern enthusiast. After a few years mucking about on a home still and learning as much as we could about whisky  they began the Thomson Whisky project as Independent Bottlers. They got hold of a few barrels of aged single malt from Willowbank Distillery, Dunedin, carefully selected to their personal tastes, to launch under the Thomson name. They started telling people about their whisky, sharing a drink with friends, then bartenders, and shops and people travelling overseas and their project started firing. A few years down the road and things have changed a lot. They are now distilling themselves like mad out in West Auckland.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.