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Camus - 'VSOP Borderies' Cognac

$90.00
Sale price

Regular price $90.00

"The most awarded VSOP Cognac at San Francisco WSC from 2013 to 2018. 

CAMUS BORDERIES VSOP is a Single Estate Cognac produced exclusively from CAMUS’ own magnificent vineyards in the very heart of the prestigious Borderies Appellation.

Borderies is the oldest and smallest cru in the appellation, representing less than 5% of the cognac AOC. With its 188 hectares, CAMUS owns the largest extension of vineyards belonging to one single producer within the Cru. Thanks to their unique clay-limestone soil rich in flints, our parcels in the Borderies Cru give origin to a very distinctive Single Estate VSOP, with deep floral notes.

CAMUS COGNAC VSOP BORDERIES TASTING NOTES:

Colour: Beautiful, consistent orange colour with flashes of rich amber.

Nose: Reveals enticing notes of vanilla pods and orange zest, on a bed of soft spice and floral aromas.

Palate: Ample and unctuous, with a robust yet elegant structure and a light hint of woodiness. Beautiful, long finish, well-balanced and wonderfully fresh.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Maison Camus

Independent since 1863 when Jean-Baptiste Camus organized a group of producers to sell cognac under the brand ‘La Grande Marque’ today, Camus continues to uphold an uncompromising family philosophy that has held for five generations.

Camus is a family business with an international attitude, driven by the passion and dedication of its people who strive to create products of the highest quality and taste. The Camus vineyards are part of a magnificent estate of 188 hectares, located in the best area within the Borderies Cru, in the very heart of the Cognac appellation. 

Rarity and refinement are at the heart of what Camus produces, where casks rich in flavour and aromas are hand-selected for use and where we as a whiskey company, have direct access to select the finest casks for our whiskey. The family ensures that the vineyards are cultivated in a sophisticated and responsible manner, allowing the fields to accumulate organic matters while preserving the wildlife in the surrounding environment.

The entrepreneur, Cyril Camus, is part of the fifth generation of Maison Camus. The partnership between two like-minded entrepreneurs, Alexander Baring and Cyril Camus is as unique as it is natural as the setting where the casks mature on Lambay, due to their mutual beliefs in driving ambition and innovation through the expertise of their heritage and impeccable standards.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

"The most awarded VSOP Cognac at San Francisco WSC from 2013 to 2018. 

CAMUS BORDERIES VSOP is a Single Estate Cognac produced exclusively from CAMUS’ own magnificent vineyards in the very heart of the prestigious Borderies Appellation.

Borderies is the oldest and smallest cru in the appellation, representing less than 5% of the cognac AOC. With its 188 hectares, CAMUS owns the largest extension of vineyards belonging to one single producer within the Cru. Thanks to their unique clay-limestone soil rich in flints, our parcels in the Borderies Cru give origin to a very distinctive Single Estate VSOP, with deep floral notes.

CAMUS COGNAC VSOP BORDERIES TASTING NOTES:

Colour: Beautiful, consistent orange colour with flashes of rich amber.

Nose: Reveals enticing notes of vanilla pods and orange zest, on a bed of soft spice and floral aromas.

Palate: Ample and unctuous, with a robust yet elegant structure and a light hint of woodiness. Beautiful, long finish, well-balanced and wonderfully fresh.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Maison Camus

Independent since 1863 when Jean-Baptiste Camus organized a group of producers to sell cognac under the brand ‘La Grande Marque’ today, Camus continues to uphold an uncompromising family philosophy that has held for five generations.

Camus is a family business with an international attitude, driven by the passion and dedication of its people who strive to create products of the highest quality and taste. The Camus vineyards are part of a magnificent estate of 188 hectares, located in the best area within the Borderies Cru, in the very heart of the Cognac appellation. 

Rarity and refinement are at the heart of what Camus produces, where casks rich in flavour and aromas are hand-selected for use and where we as a whiskey company, have direct access to select the finest casks for our whiskey. The family ensures that the vineyards are cultivated in a sophisticated and responsible manner, allowing the fields to accumulate organic matters while preserving the wildlife in the surrounding environment.

The entrepreneur, Cyril Camus, is part of the fifth generation of Maison Camus. The partnership between two like-minded entrepreneurs, Alexander Baring and Cyril Camus is as unique as it is natural as the setting where the casks mature on Lambay, due to their mutual beliefs in driving ambition and innovation through the expertise of their heritage and impeccable standards.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.