Zenkuro - 'Original Tokubetsu Junmai' Sake 375ml

$35.00
Sale price

Regular price $35.00

"For those who have not drunk sake before, or those who have, but drank too much too quickly, we suggest you try this smooth, light, easy drinking style. Zenkuro Original is a great alternative to either white or red wine with your meal, it is a great match with a wide range of Japanese, European or Kiwi dishes.

全黒オリジナル特別純米 アルコール度14%

日本酒を飲んだことがない方、苦手意識がある方でも楽しんでいただけるように、少し低めのルコール度数に仕上げました。軽い飲み心地をお楽しみください。日本料理、ニュージーランド料理、西洋料理など、幅広い料理に合わせやすい仕上がりです。

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Zenkuro Sake Brewery

New Zealand’s first and only sake brewery, Zenkuro Sake is based in Queenstown. We produce premium grade junmai ginjo and junmai sake using highly polished, certified sake rice from Japan, and soft water sourced from the Southern Alps. The purity of our ingredients allow us to hand-craft a unique style of sake with well balanced flavours, gentle umami and delicate aromas. Zenkuro Sake is best enjoyed together with friends, family and your favourite food.  With no preservatives, clarifiers or additives of any sort, Zenkuro Sake can be enjoyed as a healthy accompaniment to any meal. Zenkuro is available throughout New Zealand, in London, in Japan, in Australia and now Hong Kong.

Our brand name is Zenkuro. While the character 全 (zen) means ‘all’ or ‘completely’, 黒 (kuro) means ‘black’ – a mix that brings an image of balanced strength, passion, pride and determination to succeed, that is uniquely Kiwi!

Head Brewer David Joll is a “Certified Advanced Sake Professional” and has worked and studied alongside some of Japan’s best brewers. Our small brewing team works together with passion and pride, determined to craft sake that all of NZ can be proud to call its own.

日本の伝統的な製法に基づいて、酒米とサザンアルプスから流れ出るクイーンズタウンの純粋な水によって作られた純米酒です。精米歩合60%の酒米を使い、食事に合うことを一番の目的として作られた、添加物なしで、体に優しいニュージーランド純米酒を是非お試しください。日本食はもとより、ニュージーランドのシーフード、肉料理など幅広い料理に合わせられる口当たりの良いお酒です。

ニュージーランドの〝最強″のイメージをもとに誕生し命名された〝″(Completely)、〝″(Black)。ニュージーランド初、クイーンズタウンの地酒を、地元のお食事とともに冷やしてお楽しみください。


The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

"For those who have not drunk sake before, or those who have, but drank too much too quickly, we suggest you try this smooth, light, easy drinking style. Zenkuro Original is a great alternative to either white or red wine with your meal, it is a great match with a wide range of Japanese, European or Kiwi dishes.

全黒オリジナル特別純米 アルコール度14%

日本酒を飲んだことがない方、苦手意識がある方でも楽しんでいただけるように、少し低めのルコール度数に仕上げました。軽い飲み心地をお楽しみください。日本料理、ニュージーランド料理、西洋料理など、幅広い料理に合わせやすい仕上がりです。

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Zenkuro Sake Brewery

New Zealand’s first and only sake brewery, Zenkuro Sake is based in Queenstown. We produce premium grade junmai ginjo and junmai sake using highly polished, certified sake rice from Japan, and soft water sourced from the Southern Alps. The purity of our ingredients allow us to hand-craft a unique style of sake with well balanced flavours, gentle umami and delicate aromas. Zenkuro Sake is best enjoyed together with friends, family and your favourite food.  With no preservatives, clarifiers or additives of any sort, Zenkuro Sake can be enjoyed as a healthy accompaniment to any meal. Zenkuro is available throughout New Zealand, in London, in Japan, in Australia and now Hong Kong.

Our brand name is Zenkuro. While the character 全 (zen) means ‘all’ or ‘completely’, 黒 (kuro) means ‘black’ – a mix that brings an image of balanced strength, passion, pride and determination to succeed, that is uniquely Kiwi!

Head Brewer David Joll is a “Certified Advanced Sake Professional” and has worked and studied alongside some of Japan’s best brewers. Our small brewing team works together with passion and pride, determined to craft sake that all of NZ can be proud to call its own.

日本の伝統的な製法に基づいて、酒米とサザンアルプスから流れ出るクイーンズタウンの純粋な水によって作られた純米酒です。精米歩合60%の酒米を使い、食事に合うことを一番の目的として作られた、添加物なしで、体に優しいニュージーランド純米酒を是非お試しください。日本食はもとより、ニュージーランドのシーフード、肉料理など幅広い料理に合わせられる口当たりの良いお酒です。

ニュージーランドの〝最強″のイメージをもとに誕生し命名された〝″(Completely)、〝″(Black)。ニュージーランド初、クイーンズタウンの地酒を、地元のお食事とともに冷やしてお楽しみください。


The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.