La Maldita - Rioja Garnacha 2019

$25.00
Sale price

Regular price $25.00

"A quaffable red; fresh and easy to drink. A nimble wine from old vines in Tudelilla and Central Rioja. Part of the wine (30%) was aged in barrels for three months, while the rest matured on the lees in tanks."

VINEYARDS

More than 40 years old Garnacha Tinta vineyards, located at 700 meters altitude in Tudelilla, Rioja Baja, and 450 meters in Villamediana and Alberite, Central Rioja.

GROWING SYSTEM - Goblet-trained vines over 40 years old and 10/15-year-old espalier-trained vines. DENSITY: 3000 - 3500 plants/ha. SOIL: Gravel. ALTITUDE: From 450 up to 700 m.

VINIFICATION

HARVEST: Manual. FERMENTATION: Cold soak in stainless steel tanks to keep all the varietal character. Alcoholic fermentation at 28 °C for about 10 days with gentle pumpovers. Malolactic fermentation in tanks. AGEING 70% of the wine remains in tanks on the lees for three months. The rest is aged for the same period in French and American oak barrels.

ROBERT PARKER, 89 POINTS, 2016 - Best value Rioja young wine

PEÑÍN, 91 POINTS - Best value Rioja young wine.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Viñedos La Maldita

Until half a century ago Garnacha was the second most important grape variety in Rioja. Known as La Maldita because of the difficulty in producing high quality wines with them, and because of their low yields and low yields for the winegrower, it gradually fell into oblivion.

Only a few thousand hectares remain from that patrimony. Old vineyards, secluded, hidden in rocky terrain of difficult access, high altitude and complicated to work. But it is a living heritage that Viñedos La Maldita tries to rescue in areas where still today its spirit struggles to recover its fullness.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Grenache / Garnacha

NOT LONG AGO GARNACHA WAS STILL LOVED AND IDOLIZED ALL OVER THE WINE WORLD. SHE RESISTED DISEASES TO WHICH OTHERS SUCCUMBED AND WAS THE BASIS OF THE MOST POPULAR AND APPRECIATED WINE. THE QUEEN OF THE VARIETIES.

Her difficulties of cultivation and elaboration led her to yield to Tempranillo's push. Many of the damned Garnacha vineyards were uprooted losing more than 50% of their acreage in a few years.

From her glory came the tragedy. Today, after many years apart and hidden, it returns full of meaning perhaps to be accountable to the past. She's still generous ... but she does not forget.

Grenache or Garnacha is one of the most widely planted red wine grape varieties in the world. It ripens late, so it needs hot, dry conditions such as those found in Spain, where the grape most likely originated.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Rioja

Rioja can quite happily be called the heart of Spain's wine industry as it is producing some of the most classic wines in the country and has been doing it for quite some time now. The oldest vines are thought to date back to 2BC. Modern Rioja (Post 1850s) was actually created by French winemakers who were fleeing from the phylloxera louse that ate up their vineyards in Bordeaux, and came to Rioja for its perfect wine-growing climate in hopes to find the 'next Bordeaux'.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

"A quaffable red; fresh and easy to drink. A nimble wine from old vines in Tudelilla and Central Rioja. Part of the wine (30%) was aged in barrels for three months, while the rest matured on the lees in tanks."

VINEYARDS

More than 40 years old Garnacha Tinta vineyards, located at 700 meters altitude in Tudelilla, Rioja Baja, and 450 meters in Villamediana and Alberite, Central Rioja.

GROWING SYSTEM - Goblet-trained vines over 40 years old and 10/15-year-old espalier-trained vines. DENSITY: 3000 - 3500 plants/ha. SOIL: Gravel. ALTITUDE: From 450 up to 700 m.

VINIFICATION

HARVEST: Manual. FERMENTATION: Cold soak in stainless steel tanks to keep all the varietal character. Alcoholic fermentation at 28 °C for about 10 days with gentle pumpovers. Malolactic fermentation in tanks. AGEING 70% of the wine remains in tanks on the lees for three months. The rest is aged for the same period in French and American oak barrels.

ROBERT PARKER, 89 POINTS, 2016 - Best value Rioja young wine

PEÑÍN, 91 POINTS - Best value Rioja young wine.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Viñedos La Maldita

Until half a century ago Garnacha was the second most important grape variety in Rioja. Known as La Maldita because of the difficulty in producing high quality wines with them, and because of their low yields and low yields for the winegrower, it gradually fell into oblivion.

Only a few thousand hectares remain from that patrimony. Old vineyards, secluded, hidden in rocky terrain of difficult access, high altitude and complicated to work. But it is a living heritage that Viñedos La Maldita tries to rescue in areas where still today its spirit struggles to recover its fullness.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Grenache / Garnacha

NOT LONG AGO GARNACHA WAS STILL LOVED AND IDOLIZED ALL OVER THE WINE WORLD. SHE RESISTED DISEASES TO WHICH OTHERS SUCCUMBED AND WAS THE BASIS OF THE MOST POPULAR AND APPRECIATED WINE. THE QUEEN OF THE VARIETIES.

Her difficulties of cultivation and elaboration led her to yield to Tempranillo's push. Many of the damned Garnacha vineyards were uprooted losing more than 50% of their acreage in a few years.

From her glory came the tragedy. Today, after many years apart and hidden, it returns full of meaning perhaps to be accountable to the past. She's still generous ... but she does not forget.

Grenache or Garnacha is one of the most widely planted red wine grape varieties in the world. It ripens late, so it needs hot, dry conditions such as those found in Spain, where the grape most likely originated.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Rioja

Rioja can quite happily be called the heart of Spain's wine industry as it is producing some of the most classic wines in the country and has been doing it for quite some time now. The oldest vines are thought to date back to 2BC. Modern Rioja (Post 1850s) was actually created by French winemakers who were fleeing from the phylloxera louse that ate up their vineyards in Bordeaux, and came to Rioja for its perfect wine-growing climate in hopes to find the 'next Bordeaux'.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.