Casa Boher - Extra Brut Método Tradicional

$40.00
Sale price

Regular price $40.00

EYE
Pale golden yellow in colour with pink salmon hues. Persistent and fine bubbles with a lingering foam.

NOSE
Lively and fresh on attack with yeasty aromas of fresh bread and fruity notes of citric, peach, apple and coconut.

PALATE
Full-bodied with a refreshing acidity and a long finish. Complex flavours of yeast and fruit like grapefruit and pineapple.

GRAPE VARIETIES
70% Pinot Noir and 30% Chardonnay.

VINEYARD LOCATION
Uco Valley, Mendoza, Argentina.

METHOD
Traditional or Champenoise

PROCESS
Fermentation of base wines: 30 days. 2nd fermentation or prisse de mousse: 45 to 60 days. Ageing on lees: 18 months minimum.

ANALYTICAL DATA
Alcohol: 12,90% vol.; Sugar: 11 g/l.; Total acidity: 6,8 g/l.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Rosell Boher

The old wine estate, which was founded in the year 1900 by Bernardo Martínez, Alejandro Martínez Rosell’s grandfather, was about to be demolished, but finally recovered in 1999.

 

At Cavas Rosell Boher, we continue the family tradition of making sparkling wines, with the aim of achieving the best product of Argentina. For this purpose, we rely on top-quality grapes grown in our vineyards in Uco Valley, one of the best areas of Mendoza, at 1,300m above sea level.

Not only does the champagne method or méthode traditionnelle, a slow process at low temperature, offer a bouquet, fine bubbles and an aged product, but it also makes Rosell Boher sparklings a unique expression.

The different base wines obtained from a diversity of clones allow us a careful and detailed selection, aiming at finding the desired complexity in the final blend or “cuvée”.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Mendoza

Mendoza is the hub of the Argentinian wine trade. It is known for producing juicy and fresh red wines made from Malbec - though Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Syrah and being planted increasingly.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

EYE
Pale golden yellow in colour with pink salmon hues. Persistent and fine bubbles with a lingering foam.

NOSE
Lively and fresh on attack with yeasty aromas of fresh bread and fruity notes of citric, peach, apple and coconut.

PALATE
Full-bodied with a refreshing acidity and a long finish. Complex flavours of yeast and fruit like grapefruit and pineapple.

GRAPE VARIETIES
70% Pinot Noir and 30% Chardonnay.

VINEYARD LOCATION
Uco Valley, Mendoza, Argentina.

METHOD
Traditional or Champenoise

PROCESS
Fermentation of base wines: 30 days. 2nd fermentation or prisse de mousse: 45 to 60 days. Ageing on lees: 18 months minimum.

ANALYTICAL DATA
Alcohol: 12,90% vol.; Sugar: 11 g/l.; Total acidity: 6,8 g/l.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Rosell Boher

The old wine estate, which was founded in the year 1900 by Bernardo Martínez, Alejandro Martínez Rosell’s grandfather, was about to be demolished, but finally recovered in 1999.

 

At Cavas Rosell Boher, we continue the family tradition of making sparkling wines, with the aim of achieving the best product of Argentina. For this purpose, we rely on top-quality grapes grown in our vineyards in Uco Valley, one of the best areas of Mendoza, at 1,300m above sea level.

Not only does the champagne method or méthode traditionnelle, a slow process at low temperature, offer a bouquet, fine bubbles and an aged product, but it also makes Rosell Boher sparklings a unique expression.

The different base wines obtained from a diversity of clones allow us a careful and detailed selection, aiming at finding the desired complexity in the final blend or “cuvée”.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Mendoza

Mendoza is the hub of the Argentinian wine trade. It is known for producing juicy and fresh red wines made from Malbec - though Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Syrah and being planted increasingly.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.