Wynns Coonawarra Estate - Cabernet Sauvignon 2016

$50.00
Sale price

Regular price $50.00

"Wynns Black Label Cabernet is a true icon of Australian wine. First produced in 1954, it has a reputation for ageing gracefully and displaying excellent varietal and regional characteristics. The wine is produced from only the top quality 20 to 25 per cent of Cabernet Sauvignon fruit grown in our terra rossa vineyards.

A wine of style and stature - and a perennial favourite in auction circles - ‘Black Label’ is one of Australia’s most collectable wines and Australia’s benchmark Cabernet Sauvignon. It consistently delivers potential for medium to long-term cellaring."

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Wynns Coonawarra Estate

Since the first vineyards were planted by visionary Scottish pioneer John Riddoch in 1891, Wynns Coonawarra Estate has built a reputation as the Coonawarra region’s pre-eminent wine producer.

With the longest-established vineyards in the region, Wynns’ history is deeply intertwined with Coonawarra. Over the past two decades, our vineyards have been meticulously rejuvenated, resulting in wines which capture the true essence of the region.

1861 – 1901

'THE SQUIRE OF PENOLA'

John Riddoch, 'the Squire of Penola' and figurehead of Wynns Coonawarra Estate, moves to the Coonawarra region in 1861. In 1890, John Riddoch divides 800 hectares of terra rossa soil on his land and calls it the Coonawarra Fruit Colony. He offers four-hectare allotments at €100 each, and 26 colonists begin planting in 1891; 95,000 vines and 10,000 fruit trees were planted in the first year. By 1897, 89 hectares of vines were being cultivated by the 'blockers', 52 hectares by Riddoch. In 1891, the famous triple-gabled winery and surrounding vineyards were built and named Chateau Comaum. After a promising start, the Coonawarra Fruit Colony fails to prosper due to is distance from major markets and poor economic conditions. John Riddoch dies at Yallum Park on July 15, 1901 at the age of 73.

1901-1960S

COONAWARRA CLARET

As a wine-producing area, Coonawarra was at its lowest ebb. While 'Coonawarra Claret' was recognised in Australia, the red wine market was small as most Australians consumed fortified wines. The winery was destined to become a wool shed and sheep run until it was purchased by Melbourne-based wine makers Samuel Wynn and son David in 1951. The pair had no expectation of making a profit. David took over the winery operations in 1953, and was Australia's first wine producer to use the word 'estate' to the wine’s regionality. David commissioned Melbourne artist Richard Beck to produce a woodcut of the winery facade. This illustration has appeared on every Wynns Coonawarra Estate label since, making it one of Australia's most recognised wine symbols. Michael Shiraz (then called Hermitage) was a one-off from the 1955 vintage. The outstanding quality of the shiraz in one particular 2,300 litre vat was recognised for its quality, and bottled separately as Michael, named after David’s first son. The name and the concept were revived with the 1990 vintage.

1960-1990

OUTSTANDING WINE

Australians began to develop a taste for dry red table wine, a trend which gathered pace. Wynns consistently marketed Coonawarra Estate wines based on their variety and place of origin, building awareness of the Coonawarra district as a region of outstanding wines. Wynns increased its holdings in Coonawarra over the next two decades. By 1981, it was the largest grower in the district with 440 hectares under vine. This decade would see the first wine bearing John Riddoch's name produced in 1982, followed by the second release of Michael Shiraz in 1990.

1998-2015

SUE HODDER

In 1998 Sue Hodder is appointed Wynns Coonawarra Estate senior winemaker – a position she holds to this day. Sue oversees the release of Wynns’ first single vineyard wines, starting with the 2001 Harold Cabernet Sauvignon, and major vineyard rejuvenation projects across 300 hectares of vines, starting in 2002. In 2004, Wynns Coonawarra Estate celebrated the 50th vintage of the iconic Wynns Coonawarra wine, Black Label Cabernet Sauvignon. To mark the occasion, Wynns hosted many of the world’s most influential wine tasters in Coonawarra for a special tasting of 50 vintages of Wynns Coonawarra Estate Black Label. In 2008, Wynns Coonawarra Estate makes the first wines for the V&A Lane range and installed new open fermenters to keep small batches of single vineyard fruit separate. Three years later, another vineyard replanting project began with new rootstocks, international vine clones and selections from older top-quality Wynns vineyards.

2015 & BEYOND

BLACK LABEL CABERNET

Wynns vineyards are now consolidated around the Gables winery in the prime terra rossa vineyard sites of the region. Ongoing research and investigation is underway to ensure the best winemaking and viticultural practices are engaged for the future. In 2015, the 60th vintage of the Wynns Black Label Cabernet was made – a significant milestone in the wine’s celebrated history. Each year, Wynns’ leading wines continue to be released as part of the annual Wynnsday Collection – showcasing the history and signature style for which the Wynns label has become synonymous.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Cabernet Sauvignon

Cabernet Sauvignon is the most famous red grape and also is the most planted grape varietal in the world. It is behind the famous 'Claret' wines of Bordeaux in France where it is blended in with Merlot in the famous 'Bordeaux Blend'. In the new world, it tends to grow best in the hot climates of California, Chile, Australia and Argentina. You can expect beautiful black fruit flavours from a Cabernet Sauvignon-predominant wine. 

 

--------THE REGION--------

Coonawarra

Coonawarra is one of the most renowned winemaking regions in Australia. It is red wine country with particular 'terra rossa' soils. Cabernet Sauvignon and Shiraz are king with classy Chardonnays also being produced.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

"Wynns Black Label Cabernet is a true icon of Australian wine. First produced in 1954, it has a reputation for ageing gracefully and displaying excellent varietal and regional characteristics. The wine is produced from only the top quality 20 to 25 per cent of Cabernet Sauvignon fruit grown in our terra rossa vineyards.

A wine of style and stature - and a perennial favourite in auction circles - ‘Black Label’ is one of Australia’s most collectable wines and Australia’s benchmark Cabernet Sauvignon. It consistently delivers potential for medium to long-term cellaring."

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Wynns Coonawarra Estate

Since the first vineyards were planted by visionary Scottish pioneer John Riddoch in 1891, Wynns Coonawarra Estate has built a reputation as the Coonawarra region’s pre-eminent wine producer.

With the longest-established vineyards in the region, Wynns’ history is deeply intertwined with Coonawarra. Over the past two decades, our vineyards have been meticulously rejuvenated, resulting in wines which capture the true essence of the region.

1861 – 1901

'THE SQUIRE OF PENOLA'

John Riddoch, 'the Squire of Penola' and figurehead of Wynns Coonawarra Estate, moves to the Coonawarra region in 1861. In 1890, John Riddoch divides 800 hectares of terra rossa soil on his land and calls it the Coonawarra Fruit Colony. He offers four-hectare allotments at €100 each, and 26 colonists begin planting in 1891; 95,000 vines and 10,000 fruit trees were planted in the first year. By 1897, 89 hectares of vines were being cultivated by the 'blockers', 52 hectares by Riddoch. In 1891, the famous triple-gabled winery and surrounding vineyards were built and named Chateau Comaum. After a promising start, the Coonawarra Fruit Colony fails to prosper due to is distance from major markets and poor economic conditions. John Riddoch dies at Yallum Park on July 15, 1901 at the age of 73.

1901-1960S

COONAWARRA CLARET

As a wine-producing area, Coonawarra was at its lowest ebb. While 'Coonawarra Claret' was recognised in Australia, the red wine market was small as most Australians consumed fortified wines. The winery was destined to become a wool shed and sheep run until it was purchased by Melbourne-based wine makers Samuel Wynn and son David in 1951. The pair had no expectation of making a profit. David took over the winery operations in 1953, and was Australia's first wine producer to use the word 'estate' to the wine’s regionality. David commissioned Melbourne artist Richard Beck to produce a woodcut of the winery facade. This illustration has appeared on every Wynns Coonawarra Estate label since, making it one of Australia's most recognised wine symbols. Michael Shiraz (then called Hermitage) was a one-off from the 1955 vintage. The outstanding quality of the shiraz in one particular 2,300 litre vat was recognised for its quality, and bottled separately as Michael, named after David’s first son. The name and the concept were revived with the 1990 vintage.

1960-1990

OUTSTANDING WINE

Australians began to develop a taste for dry red table wine, a trend which gathered pace. Wynns consistently marketed Coonawarra Estate wines based on their variety and place of origin, building awareness of the Coonawarra district as a region of outstanding wines. Wynns increased its holdings in Coonawarra over the next two decades. By 1981, it was the largest grower in the district with 440 hectares under vine. This decade would see the first wine bearing John Riddoch's name produced in 1982, followed by the second release of Michael Shiraz in 1990.

1998-2015

SUE HODDER

In 1998 Sue Hodder is appointed Wynns Coonawarra Estate senior winemaker – a position she holds to this day. Sue oversees the release of Wynns’ first single vineyard wines, starting with the 2001 Harold Cabernet Sauvignon, and major vineyard rejuvenation projects across 300 hectares of vines, starting in 2002. In 2004, Wynns Coonawarra Estate celebrated the 50th vintage of the iconic Wynns Coonawarra wine, Black Label Cabernet Sauvignon. To mark the occasion, Wynns hosted many of the world’s most influential wine tasters in Coonawarra for a special tasting of 50 vintages of Wynns Coonawarra Estate Black Label. In 2008, Wynns Coonawarra Estate makes the first wines for the V&A Lane range and installed new open fermenters to keep small batches of single vineyard fruit separate. Three years later, another vineyard replanting project began with new rootstocks, international vine clones and selections from older top-quality Wynns vineyards.

2015 & BEYOND

BLACK LABEL CABERNET

Wynns vineyards are now consolidated around the Gables winery in the prime terra rossa vineyard sites of the region. Ongoing research and investigation is underway to ensure the best winemaking and viticultural practices are engaged for the future. In 2015, the 60th vintage of the Wynns Black Label Cabernet was made – a significant milestone in the wine’s celebrated history. Each year, Wynns’ leading wines continue to be released as part of the annual Wynnsday Collection – showcasing the history and signature style for which the Wynns label has become synonymous.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Cabernet Sauvignon

Cabernet Sauvignon is the most famous red grape and also is the most planted grape varietal in the world. It is behind the famous 'Claret' wines of Bordeaux in France where it is blended in with Merlot in the famous 'Bordeaux Blend'. In the new world, it tends to grow best in the hot climates of California, Chile, Australia and Argentina. You can expect beautiful black fruit flavours from a Cabernet Sauvignon-predominant wine. 

 

--------THE REGION--------

Coonawarra

Coonawarra is one of the most renowned winemaking regions in Australia. It is red wine country with particular 'terra rossa' soils. Cabernet Sauvignon and Shiraz are king with classy Chardonnays also being produced.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.