Buisson-Charles - Meursault Vieilles Vignes 2018

$150.00
Sale price

Regular price $150.00

" Two hectares total production for this wine, from six vineyards throughout Meursault. The different lieu-dits bring certain characters to the wine. Vireuils and Meix Chavaux bring freshness and tension. Marcausses, Vignes Blanches and Pellans bring body and flesh. While Millerands brings an ideal delicacy to the wine.

"A more restrained nose is even fresher with other similar aromas that precede the nicely concentrated, round and seductively textured medium-bodied flavours that terminate in a bitter lemon-suffused finish. This is certainly delicious."

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Buisson-Charles

Starting with the 2009 vintage, Catherine Buisson and her winemaker husband, Patrick Essaofficially took control of the domaine, following the retirement of her father Michel (though Monsieur Buisson is still active in the vineyards and cellar as he nears 80. In fact it is Michel who most likely prepared your wines for shipment. His 55+ years of experience and wisdom infuse every drop of wine that flows through this fabulous cellar.)

Always one of our favourite places to taste, Patrick keeps his cellar pristine. A clean and orderly cellar does not guarantee great wines, of course, but one rarely finds great wines coming from cellars that are shabby from neglect. Patrick has led a dual life for the last 20+ years, working full-time as a school teacher in Gevrey-Chambertin, as well as working at the side of his father-in-law in the vineyards and cellar.

Dinner chez Patrick & Kate is always a culinary and vinous extravaganza – she’s a great cook (her foie gras terrine is dynamite), and he’s got one of the most amazing wine cellars. His passion runs to great wines from everywhere, not just Burgundy. He’ll often surprise me with an old Barolo or something new from the Jura along with a deep selection of older Burgundies that are usually stunning.

The domaine covers just 12 acres, most of it in Meursault. There are five parcels of Village-level vines, now averaging over 65 years of age (the oldest are nearing 100.) There is a small parcel of Meursault Tessons, one of the great lieu-dits on the hillside above the southern half of the village, and there are tiny pieces of four exceptional Premier Crus. Only a few barrels of Charmes, les Cras, Goutte d’Or and Bouches-Chères are produced each year.

As of 2011, Patrick added several new treats to the program – with a barrel or two of Corton-Charlemagne, Chablis Grand Cru Vaudesir, and a couple of Chassagne-Montrachet and Puligny-Montrachet 1er Crus as well.  As of the 2017 vintage, thre wil also be some Corton Clos du Roi and Corton Perrières, as well as a couple of barrels of Volnay Fremiets 1er Cru. Quantities are microscopic, but they are worth hunting down.

The style is full-on classic here – minimal new oak, no lees-stirring – just pure, concentrated, textbook Meursault. Buisson-Charles has been somewhat of an insider’s secret for many years, but now with all the major critics singing the domaine’s praises, the cat is out of the proverbial bag. The wines all have great richness, buffered by a lively acidity that allows them to age gracefully for decades.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Chardonnay

Chardonnay is without a doubt the most known and most widely planted white grape variety around the world. It is historically home in Burgundy where it produces a more refined, mineral and poised wines all up and down the Cote de Beaune and in Chablis. Throughout the new world it gained fame in both California and Australia where it is known to produce big, rich, buttery and tropical fruit-laden white wines. 

 

--------THE REGION--------

Burgundy

Burgundy is one of the most important wine regions in the world. It is often the one region that winemakers not lucky enough to be based there strive to make wine in. Run over to your local winery and I am sure that you'll find at least one Burgundy-phile. It is the historical home of the two major grapes: Pinot Noir and Chardonnay. 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

" Two hectares total production for this wine, from six vineyards throughout Meursault. The different lieu-dits bring certain characters to the wine. Vireuils and Meix Chavaux bring freshness and tension. Marcausses, Vignes Blanches and Pellans bring body and flesh. While Millerands brings an ideal delicacy to the wine.

"A more restrained nose is even fresher with other similar aromas that precede the nicely concentrated, round and seductively textured medium-bodied flavours that terminate in a bitter lemon-suffused finish. This is certainly delicious."

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Buisson-Charles

Starting with the 2009 vintage, Catherine Buisson and her winemaker husband, Patrick Essaofficially took control of the domaine, following the retirement of her father Michel (though Monsieur Buisson is still active in the vineyards and cellar as he nears 80. In fact it is Michel who most likely prepared your wines for shipment. His 55+ years of experience and wisdom infuse every drop of wine that flows through this fabulous cellar.)

Always one of our favourite places to taste, Patrick keeps his cellar pristine. A clean and orderly cellar does not guarantee great wines, of course, but one rarely finds great wines coming from cellars that are shabby from neglect. Patrick has led a dual life for the last 20+ years, working full-time as a school teacher in Gevrey-Chambertin, as well as working at the side of his father-in-law in the vineyards and cellar.

Dinner chez Patrick & Kate is always a culinary and vinous extravaganza – she’s a great cook (her foie gras terrine is dynamite), and he’s got one of the most amazing wine cellars. His passion runs to great wines from everywhere, not just Burgundy. He’ll often surprise me with an old Barolo or something new from the Jura along with a deep selection of older Burgundies that are usually stunning.

The domaine covers just 12 acres, most of it in Meursault. There are five parcels of Village-level vines, now averaging over 65 years of age (the oldest are nearing 100.) There is a small parcel of Meursault Tessons, one of the great lieu-dits on the hillside above the southern half of the village, and there are tiny pieces of four exceptional Premier Crus. Only a few barrels of Charmes, les Cras, Goutte d’Or and Bouches-Chères are produced each year.

As of 2011, Patrick added several new treats to the program – with a barrel or two of Corton-Charlemagne, Chablis Grand Cru Vaudesir, and a couple of Chassagne-Montrachet and Puligny-Montrachet 1er Crus as well.  As of the 2017 vintage, thre wil also be some Corton Clos du Roi and Corton Perrières, as well as a couple of barrels of Volnay Fremiets 1er Cru. Quantities are microscopic, but they are worth hunting down.

The style is full-on classic here – minimal new oak, no lees-stirring – just pure, concentrated, textbook Meursault. Buisson-Charles has been somewhat of an insider’s secret for many years, but now with all the major critics singing the domaine’s praises, the cat is out of the proverbial bag. The wines all have great richness, buffered by a lively acidity that allows them to age gracefully for decades.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Chardonnay

Chardonnay is without a doubt the most known and most widely planted white grape variety around the world. It is historically home in Burgundy where it produces a more refined, mineral and poised wines all up and down the Cote de Beaune and in Chablis. Throughout the new world it gained fame in both California and Australia where it is known to produce big, rich, buttery and tropical fruit-laden white wines. 

 

--------THE REGION--------

Burgundy

Burgundy is one of the most important wine regions in the world. It is often the one region that winemakers not lucky enough to be based there strive to make wine in. Run over to your local winery and I am sure that you'll find at least one Burgundy-phile. It is the historical home of the two major grapes: Pinot Noir and Chardonnay. 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.