Lacoste-Borie - Pauillac 2015

$105.00
Sale price

Regular price $105.00

"The 2015 Lacoste-Borie has an attractive bouquet with upfront, expressive scents of crushed strawberry, raspberry coulis, cedar and light mint aromas that are well defined. There is joie de vivre here. The palate is medium-bodied with light tannin, a juicy Lacoste-Borie that wears its heart on its sleeve, hints of vanilla toward the finish suggesting it will need a couple more years to absorb the new oak. Anticipated maturity: 2020 - 2028.

The 2015 Lacoste-Borie is a blend of 60% Cabernet Sauvignon, 30% Merlot and 10% Cabernet Franc. 

The Second Wine of Château Grand-Puy-Lacoste.


--------THE PRODUCER--------

Château Grand-Puy-Lacoste

History

Château Grand-Puy-Lacoste was historically created by an adviser to the Parliament of Bordeaux in the early eighteenth century but the current castle dates from 1850. He entered the Borie family in 1978 and is now managed by François-Xavier. The Borie family has owned prestigious Grands Crus Classés for several generations now. This is undoubtedly one of the best terroirs of Pauillac and one of the most regular classified wines at the highest level. Lacoste Borie is the second wine of the famous Château Grand Puy Lacoste.

Terroir & Vinification

Located at the top of the Bages Plateau, in an excellent neighborhood, this beautiful, homogenous 50-hectare vineyard, traditionally planted with 70% Cabernet Sauvignon, 25% Merlot and 5% Cabernet Franc, produces a wine reflecting this pretty terroir.


Numerous investments have made it possible to improve the vinification and aging of Château Grand Puy Lacoste wines, which are always the subject of very careful, constant and meticulous care.


 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Bordeaux Red Blend

This is the most famous red blend of them all: Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot with, often, dollops of Cabernet Franc, Malbec and Petit Verdot. Each grape brings its own special element to the overall wine, be it acid, tannin, colour or aromatics.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Bordeaux

Bordeaux is one of the most important and well-known regions in the wine world. Home to 'Claret' a red wine made predominantly from Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot, 'Sauternes', a golden goddess of fermented botrytised white grapes, and Bordeaux Blanc, a blend of Sauvignon Blanc and Semillon which can be complex or simply refreshing.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

"The 2015 Lacoste-Borie has an attractive bouquet with upfront, expressive scents of crushed strawberry, raspberry coulis, cedar and light mint aromas that are well defined. There is joie de vivre here. The palate is medium-bodied with light tannin, a juicy Lacoste-Borie that wears its heart on its sleeve, hints of vanilla toward the finish suggesting it will need a couple more years to absorb the new oak. Anticipated maturity: 2020 - 2028.

The 2015 Lacoste-Borie is a blend of 60% Cabernet Sauvignon, 30% Merlot and 10% Cabernet Franc. 

The Second Wine of Château Grand-Puy-Lacoste.


--------THE PRODUCER--------

Château Grand-Puy-Lacoste

History

Château Grand-Puy-Lacoste was historically created by an adviser to the Parliament of Bordeaux in the early eighteenth century but the current castle dates from 1850. He entered the Borie family in 1978 and is now managed by François-Xavier. The Borie family has owned prestigious Grands Crus Classés for several generations now. This is undoubtedly one of the best terroirs of Pauillac and one of the most regular classified wines at the highest level. Lacoste Borie is the second wine of the famous Château Grand Puy Lacoste.

Terroir & Vinification

Located at the top of the Bages Plateau, in an excellent neighborhood, this beautiful, homogenous 50-hectare vineyard, traditionally planted with 70% Cabernet Sauvignon, 25% Merlot and 5% Cabernet Franc, produces a wine reflecting this pretty terroir.


Numerous investments have made it possible to improve the vinification and aging of Château Grand Puy Lacoste wines, which are always the subject of very careful, constant and meticulous care.


 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Bordeaux Red Blend

This is the most famous red blend of them all: Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot with, often, dollops of Cabernet Franc, Malbec and Petit Verdot. Each grape brings its own special element to the overall wine, be it acid, tannin, colour or aromatics.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Bordeaux

Bordeaux is one of the most important and well-known regions in the wine world. Home to 'Claret' a red wine made predominantly from Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot, 'Sauternes', a golden goddess of fermented botrytised white grapes, and Bordeaux Blanc, a blend of Sauvignon Blanc and Semillon which can be complex or simply refreshing.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.