le Puy - Emilien 2017

$95.00
Sale price

Regular price $95.00

The fruit of a plot of vines planted with 85% Merlot, 7% cabernet franc, 6% cabernet sauvignon, 1% malbec and 1% carménère.  Emilien is matured in French oak barrels and casks for 24 months.

The robe is garnet red, with hints of ruby in the younger wines and a touch of orange in the older vintages, with a diaphanous onion-skin finesse to the oldest bottles. The nose is fruity, with ripe red fruit aromas dominated by blackcurrant and redcurrant, accented with roasted almond notes and occasional hints of mushrooms and undergrowth. The palate is well-rounded, full-bodied and precise, with velvety tannins paving the way for a finish is long and enjoyably complex. A wine of great finesse, with smooth tannins in its youth but also the potential to age and grow for several decades, revealing the full depth and character of this prestigious terroir.

A wine blessed with superb longevity, which will serve as a perfect partner for traditional rustic dishes and delicate, complex cuisine alike. A small miracle of elegance and refinement.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Familie Amoreau

Set on the same rocky plateau as Saint-Emilion and Pomerol, overlooking the magnificent Dordogne valley, the area was formerly nicknamed 'Miracle Hills' on account of the superb wines produced here. The vineyard Château le Puy is the second-highest point in the Gironde department. The bulk of the current Château was built in 1832 by our ancestor Barthelemy Amoreau, but the oldest sections date from the early seventeenth century.

At Château le Puy we practice organic and biodynamic viticulture, a modern way of saying we tend to the vines just as our Grandfathers did; no chemical fertilizers, no herbicides and no artificial insecticides. During the harvests we take particular care ensure grapes are not crushed on their way to the winery. There is thus practically no oxidation before fermentation begins. We also avoid adding any extra yeasts or sugars.


The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

The fruit of a plot of vines planted with 85% Merlot, 7% cabernet franc, 6% cabernet sauvignon, 1% malbec and 1% carménère.  Emilien is matured in French oak barrels and casks for 24 months.

The robe is garnet red, with hints of ruby in the younger wines and a touch of orange in the older vintages, with a diaphanous onion-skin finesse to the oldest bottles. The nose is fruity, with ripe red fruit aromas dominated by blackcurrant and redcurrant, accented with roasted almond notes and occasional hints of mushrooms and undergrowth. The palate is well-rounded, full-bodied and precise, with velvety tannins paving the way for a finish is long and enjoyably complex. A wine of great finesse, with smooth tannins in its youth but also the potential to age and grow for several decades, revealing the full depth and character of this prestigious terroir.

A wine blessed with superb longevity, which will serve as a perfect partner for traditional rustic dishes and delicate, complex cuisine alike. A small miracle of elegance and refinement.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Familie Amoreau

Set on the same rocky plateau as Saint-Emilion and Pomerol, overlooking the magnificent Dordogne valley, the area was formerly nicknamed 'Miracle Hills' on account of the superb wines produced here. The vineyard Château le Puy is the second-highest point in the Gironde department. The bulk of the current Château was built in 1832 by our ancestor Barthelemy Amoreau, but the oldest sections date from the early seventeenth century.

At Château le Puy we practice organic and biodynamic viticulture, a modern way of saying we tend to the vines just as our Grandfathers did; no chemical fertilizers, no herbicides and no artificial insecticides. During the harvests we take particular care ensure grapes are not crushed on their way to the winery. There is thus practically no oxidation before fermentation begins. We also avoid adding any extra yeasts or sugars.


The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.