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Meyer-Näkel Grauwacke Spätburgunder 2017

$70.00
Sale price

Regular price $70.00

" Barrique-aged in old barrels. Almost pungent floral nose then lots of bright red fruit married with darker cherry notes. Very firmly structured yet still with an elegant and gentle disposition. A taut acid backbone runs through the mid-palate, which results in a fresh, clean back palate mouthfeel. A perfect marriage of Burgundian finesse with forward-thinking, modern winemaking"

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Meyer-Näkel

The name of our wine estate goes back to the marriage of our grandparents Paula Meyer and Willibald Näkel in 1950. They cultivated an area of just 1.5 hectares, yet were able to make a name for themselves because Willibald’s production of dry red wines represented thoroughly pioneering work at the time.

The Ahr is situated just north of 50˚ latitude, which most people consider to be the boundary for viticulture. The Ahr valley is Germany’s most northern red wine area and with just about 550 hectares, it is also the smallest.

In order to ripen to perfection red wines require a lot of sunlight and warmth. The secret lies in an ideal micro climate found in the Ahr due to special geological conditions. The steep south-facing vineyard slopes are perfectly angled towards the sun. The soil formed from weathered slate and Greywacke warm up easily and are able to store heat. Hence, the grapes grow in an ideal biotope of the narrow Ahr valley that is protected by the Eifel Hills.

Wine making along the Ahr was founded by the Romans. As a fifth generation family estate, a passion for wine is at the core of who we are. Today’s wine estate was established by the marriage of Paula Meyer and Willibald Näkel. Although Willibald Näkel only cultivated 1.5 hectares of vines he was already a pioneer for the then rather unusual dry red wines from the Ahr valley. Today’s 15 hectares estate is managed by his son Werner Näkel, his wife Claudia and their daughters Meike and Dőrte. Meyer-Nakel grows and produces Pinot Noir wines of exceptional quality.

“It would not be exaggerating to say that Meyer-Näkel makes some of the most outstanding Spätburgunder in Germany.”
– Jancis Robinson

--------THE REGION--------

Ahr

With 562 hectares of vineyards, the Ahr is one of the smallest wine-growing regions in Germany. Red wines in particular thrive on the steep slopes above the river. It is not only lovers of excellent red that make pilgrimages to the red wine paradise of Germany. The Romans had already appreciated the climatic advantages of the wild and romantic Ahr Valley and planted the first vines.

Today, the Ahr Valley in the north of Rhineland-Palatinate presents itself as a distinguished red wine growing region. In addition to Spätburgunder (Pinot Noir), the king of red vines, Frühburgunder is also valued and is one of the specialties of the region. Several old Frühburgunder vineyards have been discovered and are now preserved by committed wine growers.

The top Ahr wines can only be produced with great effort and dedication. In order to work on the vines and harvest, the winegrowers often have to climb through rugged crevices in extremely steep slopes, where sometimes only a few vines stand side by side. Top quality rewards this arduous work in such extreme vineyards.


The Ahr River meanders dreamily in tight bends through the bizarre rock landscape towards the Rhine and the vineyards nestle above on barren rocks. The mild climate provides the grapes in the Ahr Valley with ideal conditions, as the warmed rocks release their stored heat to the vines at night.


The holiday regions of Ahr, Rhein and Eifel attract many tourists with wonderful hiking trails, elaborate cycling routes and a Nordic walking fitness park. Many visitors hike on the picturesque Rotweinwanderweg (red wine hiking trail), which connects over 35 kilometers of wine towns from Bad Bodendorf to Altenahr. It offers spectacular views of the Ahr Valley in every season. Descents and paths lead directly to villages, where one can visit wineries and enjoy the atmosphere of the Straußwirtschaften where winegrowers invite you in to satisfy your hunger and thirst.


Romance and down to earth warmth and hospitality characterize this region as well as exceptional wines and culinary delights. Winegrowers' cooperatives and wineries invite you to lively events in old buildings and gardens. The best restaurateurs in the region often work with the top wine producers to bring events like the Gourmet & Wine series, which has been very popular for years.


The diversity of offerings inspire the senses of gourmets and wine connoisseurs all year round. You can relax and enjoy yourself at the numerous wine festivals and wine-cultural events, be it the “Open Wine Cellar Day” in April, the Ahr wine market at Pentecost, or the wine weekends during the grape harvest, which offer brilliant fireworks in the vineyards.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

" Barrique-aged in old barrels. Almost pungent floral nose then lots of bright red fruit married with darker cherry notes. Very firmly structured yet still with an elegant and gentle disposition. A taut acid backbone runs through the mid-palate, which results in a fresh, clean back palate mouthfeel. A perfect marriage of Burgundian finesse with forward-thinking, modern winemaking"

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Meyer-Näkel

The name of our wine estate goes back to the marriage of our grandparents Paula Meyer and Willibald Näkel in 1950. They cultivated an area of just 1.5 hectares, yet were able to make a name for themselves because Willibald’s production of dry red wines represented thoroughly pioneering work at the time.

The Ahr is situated just north of 50˚ latitude, which most people consider to be the boundary for viticulture. The Ahr valley is Germany’s most northern red wine area and with just about 550 hectares, it is also the smallest.

In order to ripen to perfection red wines require a lot of sunlight and warmth. The secret lies in an ideal micro climate found in the Ahr due to special geological conditions. The steep south-facing vineyard slopes are perfectly angled towards the sun. The soil formed from weathered slate and Greywacke warm up easily and are able to store heat. Hence, the grapes grow in an ideal biotope of the narrow Ahr valley that is protected by the Eifel Hills.

Wine making along the Ahr was founded by the Romans. As a fifth generation family estate, a passion for wine is at the core of who we are. Today’s wine estate was established by the marriage of Paula Meyer and Willibald Näkel. Although Willibald Näkel only cultivated 1.5 hectares of vines he was already a pioneer for the then rather unusual dry red wines from the Ahr valley. Today’s 15 hectares estate is managed by his son Werner Näkel, his wife Claudia and their daughters Meike and Dőrte. Meyer-Nakel grows and produces Pinot Noir wines of exceptional quality.

“It would not be exaggerating to say that Meyer-Näkel makes some of the most outstanding Spätburgunder in Germany.”
– Jancis Robinson

--------THE REGION--------

Ahr

With 562 hectares of vineyards, the Ahr is one of the smallest wine-growing regions in Germany. Red wines in particular thrive on the steep slopes above the river. It is not only lovers of excellent red that make pilgrimages to the red wine paradise of Germany. The Romans had already appreciated the climatic advantages of the wild and romantic Ahr Valley and planted the first vines.

Today, the Ahr Valley in the north of Rhineland-Palatinate presents itself as a distinguished red wine growing region. In addition to Spätburgunder (Pinot Noir), the king of red vines, Frühburgunder is also valued and is one of the specialties of the region. Several old Frühburgunder vineyards have been discovered and are now preserved by committed wine growers.

The top Ahr wines can only be produced with great effort and dedication. In order to work on the vines and harvest, the winegrowers often have to climb through rugged crevices in extremely steep slopes, where sometimes only a few vines stand side by side. Top quality rewards this arduous work in such extreme vineyards.


The Ahr River meanders dreamily in tight bends through the bizarre rock landscape towards the Rhine and the vineyards nestle above on barren rocks. The mild climate provides the grapes in the Ahr Valley with ideal conditions, as the warmed rocks release their stored heat to the vines at night.


The holiday regions of Ahr, Rhein and Eifel attract many tourists with wonderful hiking trails, elaborate cycling routes and a Nordic walking fitness park. Many visitors hike on the picturesque Rotweinwanderweg (red wine hiking trail), which connects over 35 kilometers of wine towns from Bad Bodendorf to Altenahr. It offers spectacular views of the Ahr Valley in every season. Descents and paths lead directly to villages, where one can visit wineries and enjoy the atmosphere of the Straußwirtschaften where winegrowers invite you in to satisfy your hunger and thirst.


Romance and down to earth warmth and hospitality characterize this region as well as exceptional wines and culinary delights. Winegrowers' cooperatives and wineries invite you to lively events in old buildings and gardens. The best restaurateurs in the region often work with the top wine producers to bring events like the Gourmet & Wine series, which has been very popular for years.


The diversity of offerings inspire the senses of gourmets and wine connoisseurs all year round. You can relax and enjoy yourself at the numerous wine festivals and wine-cultural events, be it the “Open Wine Cellar Day” in April, the Ahr wine market at Pentecost, or the wine weekends during the grape harvest, which offer brilliant fireworks in the vineyards.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.