Cocchi - Vermouth di Torino

$55.00
Sale price

Regular price $55.00

Vermouth di Torino is a collective heritage of Piedmont, starting in the late XVIII century in the royal court of Savoia and spreading to the four corners of the world in the XX century.

Cocchi Vermouth di Torino is produced according to the original recipe of Giulio Cocchi, who founded this respected House in 1891. This vermouth belongs to the category of the sweet italian vermouths, produced using fine Moscato wine as its base, which is then infused with a secret recipe of local and exotic botanicals.

Cocchi Vermouth di Torino has been the protagonist of the recent rebirth of these top-of-the-range vermouths. Great barmen from all over the world became very familiar with this product, so that it is often shortened “Cocchi Torino”. Often winning international awards, it's been crowned "2020 Top Trending Vermouth" and "2020 Best Selling Vermouth" in the World's 100 Best Bars by leading trade publication Drinks International.

Delicious neat on the rocks with a small lemon zest, it is an essential ingredient for the creation of the most classic cocktails, from Negroni to Manhattan.

75cl, 16% ABV 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Cocchi

Giulio Cocchi founded his business in the North Western Italian town of Asti in 1891 when, as a young pastry chef, he became fascinated with the pairing of food and wine. Giulio began producing quality aromatic-infused wines and, by the turn of the century, two in particular; Barolo Chinato and Aperitivo Americano, had become very popular across international markets.

Cocchi's vermouths are much more than simple wines made with the infusion of herbs and spices. Aperitifs and digestifs par excellence, the Cocchi range is a taste of Piemonte's gastronomic history which dates back to the 1900s.

Giulio Cocchi is now owned by the Bava Family, themselves highly renowned wine producers. Today the winery still maintains its artisan character using only traditional techniques to craft the distinctive spirits that have made the Cocchi name synonymous with style and quality.

From the Americano, hailed as the original, to the Barolo Chinato, once drunk for medicinal purposes and to guard against fevers, Cocchi's vermouths remain some of the most well respected and quality driven in the world today. 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

Vermouth di Torino is a collective heritage of Piedmont, starting in the late XVIII century in the royal court of Savoia and spreading to the four corners of the world in the XX century.

Cocchi Vermouth di Torino is produced according to the original recipe of Giulio Cocchi, who founded this respected House in 1891. This vermouth belongs to the category of the sweet italian vermouths, produced using fine Moscato wine as its base, which is then infused with a secret recipe of local and exotic botanicals.

Cocchi Vermouth di Torino has been the protagonist of the recent rebirth of these top-of-the-range vermouths. Great barmen from all over the world became very familiar with this product, so that it is often shortened “Cocchi Torino”. Often winning international awards, it's been crowned "2020 Top Trending Vermouth" and "2020 Best Selling Vermouth" in the World's 100 Best Bars by leading trade publication Drinks International.

Delicious neat on the rocks with a small lemon zest, it is an essential ingredient for the creation of the most classic cocktails, from Negroni to Manhattan.

75cl, 16% ABV 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Cocchi

Giulio Cocchi founded his business in the North Western Italian town of Asti in 1891 when, as a young pastry chef, he became fascinated with the pairing of food and wine. Giulio began producing quality aromatic-infused wines and, by the turn of the century, two in particular; Barolo Chinato and Aperitivo Americano, had become very popular across international markets.

Cocchi's vermouths are much more than simple wines made with the infusion of herbs and spices. Aperitifs and digestifs par excellence, the Cocchi range is a taste of Piemonte's gastronomic history which dates back to the 1900s.

Giulio Cocchi is now owned by the Bava Family, themselves highly renowned wine producers. Today the winery still maintains its artisan character using only traditional techniques to craft the distinctive spirits that have made the Cocchi name synonymous with style and quality.

From the Americano, hailed as the original, to the Barolo Chinato, once drunk for medicinal purposes and to guard against fevers, Cocchi's vermouths remain some of the most well respected and quality driven in the world today. 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.