Lustau - 'Papirusa' Manzanilla 375ml Muy Seco

$25.00
Sale price

Regular price $25.00

"AGING:   Aged following a biological aging, under a veil of yeast called 'flor' in the cool, humid, salty air of Sanlúcar de Barrameda, a fishing town on the estuary of the Guadalquivir river.

TASTING NOTES: Bright yellow colour with golden reflections. This Manzanilla is laced with sea breeze scents and pleasant chamomile and flor aromas. Bone dry and light, fresh and crisp, with a hint of sea salt on the palate. Delicate and refreshingly acid with a lingering aftertaste.

TO SERVE:  at 7 – 9ºC.   A perfect dry aperitif, but also great with Ibérico ham, salads, fresh seafood, ceviche, oysters, sushi or sushimi and fish dishes."

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Lustau 1896

The origins of Emilio Lustau S.A. date back to 1896, when Mr. José Ruiz-Berdejo, a secretary to the Court of Justice, started cultivating the vines of the family’s state, named Nuestra Señora de la Esperanza, in his spare time. In these humble beginnings he made wines which were then sold on to larger Sherry producers. This activity was known as being an almacenista or stockeeper.

In 1931, his daughter, María Ruiz-Berdejo Alberti, acquired a small winery closer to the centre of Jerez de la Frontera and moved there all the preexisting soleras, gaining notoriety and visibility.

In the 40’s, Maria’s husband, Emilio Lustau Ortega moved the winery to the old Santiago district, in the historic quarter of Jerez de la Frontera. There, in buildings that were part of the historic Moorish walls of the city, he slowly began to expand the business, still as an almacenista.

In 1945 Emilio Lustau stopped being almacenista and began to commercialize its own brands: Papirusa, Jarana, Escuadrilla, Emperatriz Eugenia and Cinta de Oro were some of them. In 1950, the company began exporting its own sherry wines.

Under the direction of Mr. Rafael Balao, Lustau became one of the most innovative companies in Jerez. The 80’s were an amazingly prosperous decade where the collection of Lustau wines developed greatly: the Solera Familiar range took shape, the first Almacenista bottlings and concept emerged (1981) and Lustau started to age the Vintage Series (1989).

In 1988 Lustau took another innovative step by introducing a new bottle design for its wines. The elegant, dark bottle with sloping shoulders is exclusive to the company, distinguishing Lustau from the other Jerez wineries.

In 1990 Lustau’s destiny changed when it merged with a Spanish family owned company prominent within the wine and spirits business: Luis Caballero. This was a milestone in Lustau’s history and meant important financial support and the possibility of further expansion and development.

In the year 2000, Lustau acquired six 19th century bodega buildings in the centre of Jerez. These picturesque buildings were restored to their original glory and today house the principal ageing bodegas of Lustau, which heads the Luis Caballero Group’s Sherry Division.

 

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Palomino

Palomino is famous for its usage in the fortified wines of Sherry where it is the base for everything from Fino to Oloroso sherries. As a white wine it is often bland but great examples of Palomino are zesty with fresh lime and green apple flavours.


--------THE REGION--------

Sanlucar de Barrameda

This is an important part of the small region in the southwest of Spain that makes the legendary fortified wines of Sherry. There are actually three towns that make up the Sherry region.  Jerez the most famous and important town with Sanlucar de Barrameda and El Puerto de Santa Maria the other two.  Manzanilla is a DO in Sanlucar de Barrameda and that wine is known as Fino in Jerez.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

"AGING:   Aged following a biological aging, under a veil of yeast called 'flor' in the cool, humid, salty air of Sanlúcar de Barrameda, a fishing town on the estuary of the Guadalquivir river.

TASTING NOTES: Bright yellow colour with golden reflections. This Manzanilla is laced with sea breeze scents and pleasant chamomile and flor aromas. Bone dry and light, fresh and crisp, with a hint of sea salt on the palate. Delicate and refreshingly acid with a lingering aftertaste.

TO SERVE:  at 7 – 9ºC.   A perfect dry aperitif, but also great with Ibérico ham, salads, fresh seafood, ceviche, oysters, sushi or sushimi and fish dishes."

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Lustau 1896

The origins of Emilio Lustau S.A. date back to 1896, when Mr. José Ruiz-Berdejo, a secretary to the Court of Justice, started cultivating the vines of the family’s state, named Nuestra Señora de la Esperanza, in his spare time. In these humble beginnings he made wines which were then sold on to larger Sherry producers. This activity was known as being an almacenista or stockeeper.

In 1931, his daughter, María Ruiz-Berdejo Alberti, acquired a small winery closer to the centre of Jerez de la Frontera and moved there all the preexisting soleras, gaining notoriety and visibility.

In the 40’s, Maria’s husband, Emilio Lustau Ortega moved the winery to the old Santiago district, in the historic quarter of Jerez de la Frontera. There, in buildings that were part of the historic Moorish walls of the city, he slowly began to expand the business, still as an almacenista.

In 1945 Emilio Lustau stopped being almacenista and began to commercialize its own brands: Papirusa, Jarana, Escuadrilla, Emperatriz Eugenia and Cinta de Oro were some of them. In 1950, the company began exporting its own sherry wines.

Under the direction of Mr. Rafael Balao, Lustau became one of the most innovative companies in Jerez. The 80’s were an amazingly prosperous decade where the collection of Lustau wines developed greatly: the Solera Familiar range took shape, the first Almacenista bottlings and concept emerged (1981) and Lustau started to age the Vintage Series (1989).

In 1988 Lustau took another innovative step by introducing a new bottle design for its wines. The elegant, dark bottle with sloping shoulders is exclusive to the company, distinguishing Lustau from the other Jerez wineries.

In 1990 Lustau’s destiny changed when it merged with a Spanish family owned company prominent within the wine and spirits business: Luis Caballero. This was a milestone in Lustau’s history and meant important financial support and the possibility of further expansion and development.

In the year 2000, Lustau acquired six 19th century bodega buildings in the centre of Jerez. These picturesque buildings were restored to their original glory and today house the principal ageing bodegas of Lustau, which heads the Luis Caballero Group’s Sherry Division.

 

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Palomino

Palomino is famous for its usage in the fortified wines of Sherry where it is the base for everything from Fino to Oloroso sherries. As a white wine it is often bland but great examples of Palomino are zesty with fresh lime and green apple flavours.


--------THE REGION--------

Sanlucar de Barrameda

This is an important part of the small region in the southwest of Spain that makes the legendary fortified wines of Sherry. There are actually three towns that make up the Sherry region.  Jerez the most famous and important town with Sanlucar de Barrameda and El Puerto de Santa Maria the other two.  Manzanilla is a DO in Sanlucar de Barrameda and that wine is known as Fino in Jerez.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.