Delgado Zuleta - 'Zuleta' Amontillado Viejo 20 YO 500ml

$160.00
Sale price

Regular price $160.00

"Destined, since its creation, solely for the consumption by the Delgado Zuleta family.  Its original soleras are located in the foundation bodega in Calle Carmen Viejo, in the suburb Bajo de Sanlúcar. Certified as VOS (Very Old Sherry), it is a classic amontillado from Sanlucar with fine and elegant noteson the nose and very suave on the palate..

FICHA TÉCNICA

A Very Old Sherry, generous and very old, with more than 20 years in an oxidative crianza, pero que en sus inicios tuvo crianza biológica. Made from 100% palomino grapes in a typical and traditional criadera/solera system. American oak barrels are used. It has 20% alc/vol. 

NOTA DE CATA

De color ámbar limpio y brillante, con reflejos y ribete verdoso. En nariz es intenso y limpio y a la vez muy profundo. Presenta aromas propios de la crianza biológica evolucionados, con ciertas notas de cítricos y maderas nobles. En boca es seco, con un paso inicial fino, para dar lugar a un largo final en el que las notas oxidativas están presentes.

MARIDAJE

Un vino muy gastronómico. Dada su versatilidad, sus múltiples matices, su estructura y su suavidad en boca, puede acompañar una comida desde el principio con los aperitivos hasta el final, en armonías cada vez más apreciadas por los sumilleres, con los postres. Perfecto para guisos de legumbres, cocidos y estofados.

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Delgado Zuleta

Delgado Zuleta is the oldest, still active, producer of Sherry. Most Sherry is produced in Jerez but there is a smaller town of Sanlucar de Barrameda, which is more coastal, still permitted to produce Sherry wines, this is where Delgado Zuleta is set up. They have been producing top quality Sherry wines since 1744. The forefront of Delgado Zuleta's portfolio is of the Manzanilla Sherries.

 

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Palomino

Palomino is famous for its usage in the fortified wines of Sherry where it is the base for everything from Fino to Oloroso sherries. As a white wine it is often bland but great examples of Palomino are zesty with fresh lime and green apple flavours.


 

--------THE REGION--------

Sanlucar de Barrameda

This is an important part of the small region in the southwest of Spain that makes the legendary fortified wines of Sherry. There are actually three towns that make up the Sherry region.  Jerez, the most famous and important town with Sanlucar de Barrameda and El Puerto de Santa Maria the other two.  Manzanilla is a DO in Sanlucar de Barrameda and that wine is known as Fino in Jerez.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

"Destined, since its creation, solely for the consumption by the Delgado Zuleta family.  Its original soleras are located in the foundation bodega in Calle Carmen Viejo, in the suburb Bajo de Sanlúcar. Certified as VOS (Very Old Sherry), it is a classic amontillado from Sanlucar with fine and elegant noteson the nose and very suave on the palate..

FICHA TÉCNICA

A Very Old Sherry, generous and very old, with more than 20 years in an oxidative crianza, pero que en sus inicios tuvo crianza biológica. Made from 100% palomino grapes in a typical and traditional criadera/solera system. American oak barrels are used. It has 20% alc/vol. 

NOTA DE CATA

De color ámbar limpio y brillante, con reflejos y ribete verdoso. En nariz es intenso y limpio y a la vez muy profundo. Presenta aromas propios de la crianza biológica evolucionados, con ciertas notas de cítricos y maderas nobles. En boca es seco, con un paso inicial fino, para dar lugar a un largo final en el que las notas oxidativas están presentes.

MARIDAJE

Un vino muy gastronómico. Dada su versatilidad, sus múltiples matices, su estructura y su suavidad en boca, puede acompañar una comida desde el principio con los aperitivos hasta el final, en armonías cada vez más apreciadas por los sumilleres, con los postres. Perfecto para guisos de legumbres, cocidos y estofados.

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Delgado Zuleta

Delgado Zuleta is the oldest, still active, producer of Sherry. Most Sherry is produced in Jerez but there is a smaller town of Sanlucar de Barrameda, which is more coastal, still permitted to produce Sherry wines, this is where Delgado Zuleta is set up. They have been producing top quality Sherry wines since 1744. The forefront of Delgado Zuleta's portfolio is of the Manzanilla Sherries.

 

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Palomino

Palomino is famous for its usage in the fortified wines of Sherry where it is the base for everything from Fino to Oloroso sherries. As a white wine it is often bland but great examples of Palomino are zesty with fresh lime and green apple flavours.


 

--------THE REGION--------

Sanlucar de Barrameda

This is an important part of the small region in the southwest of Spain that makes the legendary fortified wines of Sherry. There are actually three towns that make up the Sherry region.  Jerez, the most famous and important town with Sanlucar de Barrameda and El Puerto de Santa Maria the other two.  Manzanilla is a DO in Sanlucar de Barrameda and that wine is known as Fino in Jerez.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.