The Irishman - Founders Reserve Small Batch Irish Whiskey

$75.00
Sale price

Regular price $75.00

"The Founder’s Reserve is a unique take on the old Irish Pot Still Whiskey and is the original and signature blend created by founder Bernard Walsh. It is a blend of two styles, Single Malt and Single Pot Still. The proportions used are 70% Single Malt and 30% Single Pot Still. This is unusual in itself, as it is the only Irish blended whiskey to contain 100% whiskey distillates from the copper pot still and 0% Grain or Column still whiskey. This results in a much more flavoursome whiskey. The Founder’s Reserve is triple distilled and matured in Bourbon Casks. A Gold Medal Winner at The International Spirits Challenge in London, one of the highest rated Irish Whiskey’s in Jim Murray’s Whiskey Bible with 93 points – “Quite a Wonderful Blend” and most recently awarded Gold at “The Whiskey Masters” as overall winner in “The Irish Whiskey Category”.

Nose

A Zesty Spice, with hints of black pepper, cinnamon and peaches. A slight hint of vanilla too, with a suggestive savour of Green Apple.

Palate

Pot Still Spice, malt, dark chocolate, bourbon oak, and crème caramel

Finish

Everlasting finish with oak and butterscotch. Lingers for what seems like an eternity!

Awards

  • Gold Medal at International Spirits Challenge London.
  • Gold Medal at International Spirits Competition San Francisco.
  • 94 Points Beverage Tasting Institute USA.
  • 93 Points Jim Murray Whiskey Bible
  • Gold Medal at International Spirits Competition San Francisco 2013
--------THE PRODUCER--------

Walsh Whiskey

Our family is dedicated to playing our part in the revival of Irish whiskey as one of the world’s most appreciated spirits. We are doing this through the recreation of some old recipes from the 19th century, Ireland’s golden era of whiskey distilling, and also through the introduction of innovative new expressions for new palettes in a new era.

We are passionate for both innovation and attention to detail. We believe that our passion, innovation and attention-to-detail make a real difference to the enjoyment of people who choose our whiskeys and so they drive our family’s dream to create a legacy of whiskey excellence.

Bernard & Rosemary Walsh

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

"The Founder’s Reserve is a unique take on the old Irish Pot Still Whiskey and is the original and signature blend created by founder Bernard Walsh. It is a blend of two styles, Single Malt and Single Pot Still. The proportions used are 70% Single Malt and 30% Single Pot Still. This is unusual in itself, as it is the only Irish blended whiskey to contain 100% whiskey distillates from the copper pot still and 0% Grain or Column still whiskey. This results in a much more flavoursome whiskey. The Founder’s Reserve is triple distilled and matured in Bourbon Casks. A Gold Medal Winner at The International Spirits Challenge in London, one of the highest rated Irish Whiskey’s in Jim Murray’s Whiskey Bible with 93 points – “Quite a Wonderful Blend” and most recently awarded Gold at “The Whiskey Masters” as overall winner in “The Irish Whiskey Category”.

Nose

A Zesty Spice, with hints of black pepper, cinnamon and peaches. A slight hint of vanilla too, with a suggestive savour of Green Apple.

Palate

Pot Still Spice, malt, dark chocolate, bourbon oak, and crème caramel

Finish

Everlasting finish with oak and butterscotch. Lingers for what seems like an eternity!

Awards

  • Gold Medal at International Spirits Challenge London.
  • Gold Medal at International Spirits Competition San Francisco.
  • 94 Points Beverage Tasting Institute USA.
  • 93 Points Jim Murray Whiskey Bible
  • Gold Medal at International Spirits Competition San Francisco 2013
--------THE PRODUCER--------

Walsh Whiskey

Our family is dedicated to playing our part in the revival of Irish whiskey as one of the world’s most appreciated spirits. We are doing this through the recreation of some old recipes from the 19th century, Ireland’s golden era of whiskey distilling, and also through the introduction of innovative new expressions for new palettes in a new era.

We are passionate for both innovation and attention to detail. We believe that our passion, innovation and attention-to-detail make a real difference to the enjoyment of people who choose our whiskeys and so they drive our family’s dream to create a legacy of whiskey excellence.

Bernard & Rosemary Walsh

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.