Giesen - 'The Fuder' Single Vineyard Matthews Lane Sauvignon Blanc 2014

$43.00
Sale price

Regular price $43.00

" An aromatic, punchy Sauvignon Blanc showcasing our Matthews Lane vineyard in the Wairau Valley, aged on lees in 1,000l German Fuder barrels.  

Winemaking

We hand pick the fruit from Matthews Lane vineyard ensuring each parcel of fruit is in pristine condition.

After a yeast starter the juice rests on yeast lees for 11 months in new 1,000l German Oak Fuder Barrels.

The use of Fuder barrels in this way ensures our Single Vineyard white wines develop a greater complexity and refinement because oak doesn’t dominate.

The ratio of wine in contact with the barrel surface is less than smaller barrels so oak pick up is less. The staves of Fuder barrels are thicker which means the temperature of ferment tends to be warmer and we find the fruit characters gain greater depth and complexity.

The journey of each Single Vineyard wine starts in a Marlborough vineyard selected for its unique terroir and climate. They are then nurtured with meticulous hands-on viticulture to ensure fruit produces highly concentrated flavour. Our winemaking expertise then allows these wines to speak for themselves, their purity becoming a showcase of the land.

Located in the heart of Marlborough’s acclaimed Wairau Valley our Matthews Lane vineyard produces fruit with intensity and purity. There is a lot of variation throughout the Matthews Lane vineyard, producing characteristics of citrus and lime through to fleshy stonefruit, pineapple through to intense gooseberry.

The vineyard is 3.8km to the Wairau river and 12km from the coast. The soil is light free draining.

We have supplied over one million vine cuttings to nurseries in Marlborough from this vineyard, so it could be said that many of the region’s vines have originated from our Matthews Lane vineyard."

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Giesen

Dog Point vineyard is located on the southern side of Marlborough’s Wairau Valley. With its silty clay soil and clay loam soils on the hillside, the land is excellent for viticulture. Dog Point’s Sauvignon Blanc, Chardonnay and Pinot Noir are sourced from selected parcels, all chosen from older vines and supplemented with younger hillside vines.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Sauvignon Blanc

Sauvignon Blanc is easily one of the most recognisable white wines on the planet. Everything from green fruits, citrus and tropical fruits to lovely floral aromatics. Historically it is found in Bordeaux where it is blended with Semillon to produce dry white wines or the luscious sweet wines of Sauternes. As a single varietal and in a leaner style it is famous in the Loire Valley specifically in Sancerre and Pouilly-Fume. However, New Zealand is the most famous home for it in the new world where Marlborough is king. 

 

--------THE REGION--------

Marlborough

New Zealand's answer to Napa Valley, Marlborough accounts for the majority of New Zealand's vines and wine productionOver 75 percent of the vineyards are planted with Sauvignon Blanc and it is where this varietal really shines. The region is also home to New Zealand’s small sparkling-wine industry, using the traditional method to vinify Pinot Noir and Chardonnay.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

" An aromatic, punchy Sauvignon Blanc showcasing our Matthews Lane vineyard in the Wairau Valley, aged on lees in 1,000l German Fuder barrels.  

Winemaking

We hand pick the fruit from Matthews Lane vineyard ensuring each parcel of fruit is in pristine condition.

After a yeast starter the juice rests on yeast lees for 11 months in new 1,000l German Oak Fuder Barrels.

The use of Fuder barrels in this way ensures our Single Vineyard white wines develop a greater complexity and refinement because oak doesn’t dominate.

The ratio of wine in contact with the barrel surface is less than smaller barrels so oak pick up is less. The staves of Fuder barrels are thicker which means the temperature of ferment tends to be warmer and we find the fruit characters gain greater depth and complexity.

The journey of each Single Vineyard wine starts in a Marlborough vineyard selected for its unique terroir and climate. They are then nurtured with meticulous hands-on viticulture to ensure fruit produces highly concentrated flavour. Our winemaking expertise then allows these wines to speak for themselves, their purity becoming a showcase of the land.

Located in the heart of Marlborough’s acclaimed Wairau Valley our Matthews Lane vineyard produces fruit with intensity and purity. There is a lot of variation throughout the Matthews Lane vineyard, producing characteristics of citrus and lime through to fleshy stonefruit, pineapple through to intense gooseberry.

The vineyard is 3.8km to the Wairau river and 12km from the coast. The soil is light free draining.

We have supplied over one million vine cuttings to nurseries in Marlborough from this vineyard, so it could be said that many of the region’s vines have originated from our Matthews Lane vineyard."

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Giesen

Dog Point vineyard is located on the southern side of Marlborough’s Wairau Valley. With its silty clay soil and clay loam soils on the hillside, the land is excellent for viticulture. Dog Point’s Sauvignon Blanc, Chardonnay and Pinot Noir are sourced from selected parcels, all chosen from older vines and supplemented with younger hillside vines.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Sauvignon Blanc

Sauvignon Blanc is easily one of the most recognisable white wines on the planet. Everything from green fruits, citrus and tropical fruits to lovely floral aromatics. Historically it is found in Bordeaux where it is blended with Semillon to produce dry white wines or the luscious sweet wines of Sauternes. As a single varietal and in a leaner style it is famous in the Loire Valley specifically in Sancerre and Pouilly-Fume. However, New Zealand is the most famous home for it in the new world where Marlborough is king. 

 

--------THE REGION--------

Marlborough

New Zealand's answer to Napa Valley, Marlborough accounts for the majority of New Zealand's vines and wine productionOver 75 percent of the vineyards are planted with Sauvignon Blanc and it is where this varietal really shines. The region is also home to New Zealand’s small sparkling-wine industry, using the traditional method to vinify Pinot Noir and Chardonnay.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.