Domaine Odoul-Coquard - Chambolle-Musigny 2017

$110.00
Sale price

Regular price $110.00

Perfumed; lots of flowers here. Direct, fine, and good intensity and transparency. Fine and very, very good…

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Odoul-Coquard

The family estate is in Morey-St-Denis, 15 kilometres south of Dijon, in the prestigious Cote de Nuits appellation. From generation to generation, the domain evolved with a constant concern for the quality and the respect for traditions. He loves to work in the vineyard, with minimal intervention in the cellar, in order to reveal the terroir of individual sites.

Sebastien Odoul is a masterful, young(ish) grower located on the road heading north out of Morey-Saint-Denis.

He makes a modern style of red burgundy with intense, soft fruit flavours, not unlike those of his friend Arnaud Mortet. The estate has its origins in the 1930s and subsequently his grandfather started selling wines in bottle, an activity which was continued by his father. His Vosne-Romanée vines come from his father’s side whilst the Morey-Saint-Denis, Gevrey-Chambertin and Chambolle-Musigny vines hail from his maternal ‘Coquard’ grandfather. Covering 8.85 ha of vines, they have 44 parcels in 22 appellations; “a lot of work, these small parcels,” says Sebastien! The roster includes two grands crus and four 1er crus including Morey-Saint-Denis ‘Clos la Riotte’. This is owned by the commune and is leased to the domaine in the village that holds the least premier cru vines, as long as it gives back half the wine for village parties! The average age of the vines is a respectable 45 years. So what is the secret to these gloriously fruit-filled wines? Firstly Sebastien doesn’t like stalks so he de-stems 100%. He places great importance on nine days of cold soaking at 5°C before the fermentation. He then ferments at 25°C with daily pumping over and punching down, but the fruit is kept fresh under a layer of dry ice. Finally he never filters nor fines his wines.

 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

Perfumed; lots of flowers here. Direct, fine, and good intensity and transparency. Fine and very, very good…

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Odoul-Coquard

The family estate is in Morey-St-Denis, 15 kilometres south of Dijon, in the prestigious Cote de Nuits appellation. From generation to generation, the domain evolved with a constant concern for the quality and the respect for traditions. He loves to work in the vineyard, with minimal intervention in the cellar, in order to reveal the terroir of individual sites.

Sebastien Odoul is a masterful, young(ish) grower located on the road heading north out of Morey-Saint-Denis.

He makes a modern style of red burgundy with intense, soft fruit flavours, not unlike those of his friend Arnaud Mortet. The estate has its origins in the 1930s and subsequently his grandfather started selling wines in bottle, an activity which was continued by his father. His Vosne-Romanée vines come from his father’s side whilst the Morey-Saint-Denis, Gevrey-Chambertin and Chambolle-Musigny vines hail from his maternal ‘Coquard’ grandfather. Covering 8.85 ha of vines, they have 44 parcels in 22 appellations; “a lot of work, these small parcels,” says Sebastien! The roster includes two grands crus and four 1er crus including Morey-Saint-Denis ‘Clos la Riotte’. This is owned by the commune and is leased to the domaine in the village that holds the least premier cru vines, as long as it gives back half the wine for village parties! The average age of the vines is a respectable 45 years. So what is the secret to these gloriously fruit-filled wines? Firstly Sebastien doesn’t like stalks so he de-stems 100%. He places great importance on nine days of cold soaking at 5°C before the fermentation. He then ferments at 25°C with daily pumping over and punching down, but the fruit is kept fresh under a layer of dry ice. Finally he never filters nor fines his wines.

 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.