Domaine de l'Arlot - Nuits-Saint-Georges 1er cru Clos de Forets 2018

$225.00
Sale price

Regular price $225.00

The nose reveals aromas of black fruit such as cherry and blackberry, and floral notes that give this wine greater depth, both in colour and substance. Spicy notes also contribute to this wine's make-up. The palate is creamy, round, fresh, generous and spicy. Its complexity requires a lot of time and patience but guarantees enjoyment. The finish is long, intense and persistent.

Grape 100% Pinot noir

Food match roasted duck, roasted and grilled red meats, Epoisses, Langres cheese

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Domaine d'Arlot

2 kilometres to the south of Nuits Saint Georges, at Premeaux-Prissey, the Domaine de l'Arlot is a classic example of an ancient Côte de Nuits Burgundian property.

Old archives recall the presence of Jean-Charles Vienot, heir, from a long line of Burgundians and owner of a house and vines at the end of the eighteenth century in the village of Prémeaux. He was an enterprising man who built a wall around the domaine and thus created the Clos de l'Arlot, which is today a Nuits Saint Georges 1er Cru.

In 1891, the property was sold to a wine merchant, Jules Belin, who enlarged the estate through his purchase of the Clos des Forêts Saint Georges and the Clos du Chapeau, the whole of which went to form the Domaine de l'Arlot. His heirs transferred the buildings and vines to AXA Millésimes almost a century later, at the beginning of 1987. Since then, AXA Millésimes has acquired two plots in Vosne Romanée: Vosne Romanée 1er Cru - Les Suchots and Romanée Saint Vivant Grand Cru.

A fabulous park

François Vienot, Jean-Charles' son, had dreamed of a remarkable park in the hollow of an old quarry. Today, hundred-year-old trees, with light filtering through the leaves, and stones which were sculpted by numerous artists at the request of Jules Belin, make this a fabulous theatrical place and a delightful contrast to the strictness of the rows of vines.

Key figures in the Arlot story

The domaine's recent history remains marked by the influence of Jean-Pierre de Smet who ran the domaine for almost two decades. In January 2007, he handed over the direction of the domaine to Christian Seely, who entrusted technical management firstly to Olivier Leriche, then to Jacques Devauges in August 2011, and later to Géraldine Godot in September 2014.

Géraldine Godot is a microbiologist and oenologist. Originating from Burgundy, she studied and spent a large part of her career in the region.


 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir produces some of the world's most expensive, most lauded, rarest and delicious wines. Equally it is one of the most difficult grapes to grow successfully and as a result it is quite hard to make a balanced Pinot Noir. It is historically from Burgundy, most specifically in the Cote de Nuits, so much so that people will refer to Pinot Noir as a 'Burgundy'.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Burgundy

Burgundy is one of the most important wine regions in the world. It is often the one region that winemakers not lucky enough to be based there strive to make wine in. Run over to your local winery and I am sure that you'll find at least one Burgundy-phile. It is the historical home of the two major grapes: Pinot Noir and Chardonnay. 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

The nose reveals aromas of black fruit such as cherry and blackberry, and floral notes that give this wine greater depth, both in colour and substance. Spicy notes also contribute to this wine's make-up. The palate is creamy, round, fresh, generous and spicy. Its complexity requires a lot of time and patience but guarantees enjoyment. The finish is long, intense and persistent.

Grape 100% Pinot noir

Food match roasted duck, roasted and grilled red meats, Epoisses, Langres cheese

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Domaine d'Arlot

2 kilometres to the south of Nuits Saint Georges, at Premeaux-Prissey, the Domaine de l'Arlot is a classic example of an ancient Côte de Nuits Burgundian property.

Old archives recall the presence of Jean-Charles Vienot, heir, from a long line of Burgundians and owner of a house and vines at the end of the eighteenth century in the village of Prémeaux. He was an enterprising man who built a wall around the domaine and thus created the Clos de l'Arlot, which is today a Nuits Saint Georges 1er Cru.

In 1891, the property was sold to a wine merchant, Jules Belin, who enlarged the estate through his purchase of the Clos des Forêts Saint Georges and the Clos du Chapeau, the whole of which went to form the Domaine de l'Arlot. His heirs transferred the buildings and vines to AXA Millésimes almost a century later, at the beginning of 1987. Since then, AXA Millésimes has acquired two plots in Vosne Romanée: Vosne Romanée 1er Cru - Les Suchots and Romanée Saint Vivant Grand Cru.

A fabulous park

François Vienot, Jean-Charles' son, had dreamed of a remarkable park in the hollow of an old quarry. Today, hundred-year-old trees, with light filtering through the leaves, and stones which were sculpted by numerous artists at the request of Jules Belin, make this a fabulous theatrical place and a delightful contrast to the strictness of the rows of vines.

Key figures in the Arlot story

The domaine's recent history remains marked by the influence of Jean-Pierre de Smet who ran the domaine for almost two decades. In January 2007, he handed over the direction of the domaine to Christian Seely, who entrusted technical management firstly to Olivier Leriche, then to Jacques Devauges in August 2011, and later to Géraldine Godot in September 2014.

Géraldine Godot is a microbiologist and oenologist. Originating from Burgundy, she studied and spent a large part of her career in the region.


 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir produces some of the world's most expensive, most lauded, rarest and delicious wines. Equally it is one of the most difficult grapes to grow successfully and as a result it is quite hard to make a balanced Pinot Noir. It is historically from Burgundy, most specifically in the Cote de Nuits, so much so that people will refer to Pinot Noir as a 'Burgundy'.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Burgundy

Burgundy is one of the most important wine regions in the world. It is often the one region that winemakers not lucky enough to be based there strive to make wine in. Run over to your local winery and I am sure that you'll find at least one Burgundy-phile. It is the historical home of the two major grapes: Pinot Noir and Chardonnay. 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.