Domaine des Ronces - 'Florale Chardonnay' 2015 JURA

$68.00
Sale price

Regular price $68.00

"Chardonnay grape variety, imposes its elegance, its fine nose, long in the mouth develops very subtle aromas.

This wine offers a bouquet of freshness where peach, pear and exotic fruit are confined. "

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Domaine des Ronces

The estate was founded in 1950 by Georges MAZIER in the town of Orbagna, located in the south of the Jura vineyards, on the AOC COTES DU JURA. 

The exploitation was resumed in 1986 by Michel MAZIER, son of Georges. Over the years the estate has grown to ​​6 ha. 

In 2010, the domain started conversion to organic agriculture and it was certified ORGANIC in 2013.  In 2014, the domain began focusing on biodynamics (using natural plants and horn dung, silica and wicker tea for treatment).

In 2016, the estate was certified Demeter and his son, Kevin, took over the reins.

The range is very varied: from floral white to typical white, Pinot red, Poulsard, Trousseau to Rosé, Crémant Blanc, Blanc de noir to Crémant Rosé and without forgetting straw wine and Macvin.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Chardonnay


 

--------THE REGION--------

The Jura

The Jura is a region in eastern France, between Burgundy and Switzerland. Between Burgundy and the Jura is La Bresse, flat land lying on either side of the river Saône. The vines start when the ground begins to rise to the east and towards a large limestone plateau. The climate is continental, long cold winters and hot summers but with more rain than in Burgundy. The two vineyards, incidentally, are only about an hour's drive away. But the feel is different. The Jura seems to me always greener, lusher, which would offer an explanation, surely, for the extraordinary array of cheeses.

The land under vine occupies a very small area among the foothills of the Jura, amounting to about 2,000 ha, although prior to phylloxera it used to be ten times the size. It is one of the smallest wine regions in France. The soil, not surprisingly, is limestone but with overlays of clays of varying hues which account for both the number of grape varieties used and for the complex nature of so many of the wines. Vines are trained quite high in order to avoid spring frosts. Growers in the Jura need plenty of patience and nerves of steel as the harvest can easily extend into November.

The Jura is famous for its eccentric varieties. Today there are five of them including three reds. At one time there may have been 40 or more.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

"Chardonnay grape variety, imposes its elegance, its fine nose, long in the mouth develops very subtle aromas.

This wine offers a bouquet of freshness where peach, pear and exotic fruit are confined. "

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Domaine des Ronces

The estate was founded in 1950 by Georges MAZIER in the town of Orbagna, located in the south of the Jura vineyards, on the AOC COTES DU JURA. 

The exploitation was resumed in 1986 by Michel MAZIER, son of Georges. Over the years the estate has grown to ​​6 ha. 

In 2010, the domain started conversion to organic agriculture and it was certified ORGANIC in 2013.  In 2014, the domain began focusing on biodynamics (using natural plants and horn dung, silica and wicker tea for treatment).

In 2016, the estate was certified Demeter and his son, Kevin, took over the reins.

The range is very varied: from floral white to typical white, Pinot red, Poulsard, Trousseau to Rosé, Crémant Blanc, Blanc de noir to Crémant Rosé and without forgetting straw wine and Macvin.

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Chardonnay


 

--------THE REGION--------

The Jura

The Jura is a region in eastern France, between Burgundy and Switzerland. Between Burgundy and the Jura is La Bresse, flat land lying on either side of the river Saône. The vines start when the ground begins to rise to the east and towards a large limestone plateau. The climate is continental, long cold winters and hot summers but with more rain than in Burgundy. The two vineyards, incidentally, are only about an hour's drive away. But the feel is different. The Jura seems to me always greener, lusher, which would offer an explanation, surely, for the extraordinary array of cheeses.

The land under vine occupies a very small area among the foothills of the Jura, amounting to about 2,000 ha, although prior to phylloxera it used to be ten times the size. It is one of the smallest wine regions in France. The soil, not surprisingly, is limestone but with overlays of clays of varying hues which account for both the number of grape varieties used and for the complex nature of so many of the wines. Vines are trained quite high in order to avoid spring frosts. Growers in the Jura need plenty of patience and nerves of steel as the harvest can easily extend into November.

The Jura is famous for its eccentric varieties. Today there are five of them including three reds. At one time there may have been 40 or more.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.