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Domaine David Duband - Nuits-Saint-Georges 2018

$165.00
Sale price

Regular price $165.00

"Ages of the vines:  50 years

Exposure: East

Soils:  Marly limestone

Tasting notes

An elegant dress in the pink and brilliant reflections. A nose of black and red fruits with a dominant of strawberries and white pepper.  The mouth is rich supported by very present tannins.  A wine which takes out stereotypes of this naming.

Eat with blanquette of veal with pilaf rice.   Nothing else!

Wine Making

Grapes are manually collected, sorted out, and converted into wine with 80 % in whole grape harvests. During 17 days of vatting, between pigeages 5 - 7 in feet are practised, as well as reassemblies. After pressing, wines are cleaned out over 2 weeks and placed into barrels. Ageing is in 40 % new barrels and 60 % in barrels of 1, 2, 3 years. After 14 months of ageing wines are moved to tank where they remain for 3 months and then bottled without filtration or fining."

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Domaine David Duband

The Domaine David Duband lies in Chevannes, in the heart of the Hautes-Côtes de Nuits and produces refined and elegant wines from 23 prestigious appellations from Nuits-Saint-Georges to Gevrey-Chambertin.

The estate farms 17 hectares of vines organically, under the strict management of the Ecocert label. The Domaine Duband also buys grapes from a few small vinegrowers who farm with great respect for the vines and of their surrounding environment.  

David Duband loves wines that are alive, distinctive and elegant and which express the subtleties and incredible diversity of the "climats” of Burgundy. Since 2008 he has vinified his wines using whole clusters of grapes as the noble bitterness of the stems adds a certain refinement and elegance to pinot noir.

The wines of Domaine Duband are present in 16 of the 25 restaurants with 3 Michelin stars in France, including, among others, the Restaurants Georges V, Le Bristol, Le Doyen in Paris, Le Flocon de Sel on Mégève, Lameloise in Chagny, Louis XV in Monaco...  

The pinots noirs of David Duband are regularly cited in the press. His choices in regards to both viticulture and vinification have made him particularly successful. The Revue des Vins de France, in June 2012 cites the Clos de la Roche 2011 as having"inviting perfumes that evoke the traditional rose. A wine that emphasizes refinement rather than power, and in June 2013 citing the Chambolle-Musigny  1er Cru Clos Sorbé 2012 as : "A great wine, transcendental pinot noir, chiseled and refined.


 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir produces some of the world's most expensive, most lauded, rarest and delicious wines. Equally it is one of the most difficult grapes to grow successfully and as a result it is quite hard to make a balanced Pinot Noir. It is historically from Burgundy, most specifically in the Cote de Nuits, so much so that people will refer to Pinot Noir as a 'Burgundy'.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Burgundy

Burgundy is one of the most important wine regions in the world. It is often the one region that winemakers not lucky enough to be based there strive to make wine in. Run over to your local winery and I am sure that you'll find at least one Burgundy-phile. It is the historical home of the two major grapes: Pinot Noir and Chardonnay. 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

"Ages of the vines:  50 years

Exposure: East

Soils:  Marly limestone

Tasting notes

An elegant dress in the pink and brilliant reflections. A nose of black and red fruits with a dominant of strawberries and white pepper.  The mouth is rich supported by very present tannins.  A wine which takes out stereotypes of this naming.

Eat with blanquette of veal with pilaf rice.   Nothing else!

Wine Making

Grapes are manually collected, sorted out, and converted into wine with 80 % in whole grape harvests. During 17 days of vatting, between pigeages 5 - 7 in feet are practised, as well as reassemblies. After pressing, wines are cleaned out over 2 weeks and placed into barrels. Ageing is in 40 % new barrels and 60 % in barrels of 1, 2, 3 years. After 14 months of ageing wines are moved to tank where they remain for 3 months and then bottled without filtration or fining."

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Domaine David Duband

The Domaine David Duband lies in Chevannes, in the heart of the Hautes-Côtes de Nuits and produces refined and elegant wines from 23 prestigious appellations from Nuits-Saint-Georges to Gevrey-Chambertin.

The estate farms 17 hectares of vines organically, under the strict management of the Ecocert label. The Domaine Duband also buys grapes from a few small vinegrowers who farm with great respect for the vines and of their surrounding environment.  

David Duband loves wines that are alive, distinctive and elegant and which express the subtleties and incredible diversity of the "climats” of Burgundy. Since 2008 he has vinified his wines using whole clusters of grapes as the noble bitterness of the stems adds a certain refinement and elegance to pinot noir.

The wines of Domaine Duband are present in 16 of the 25 restaurants with 3 Michelin stars in France, including, among others, the Restaurants Georges V, Le Bristol, Le Doyen in Paris, Le Flocon de Sel on Mégève, Lameloise in Chagny, Louis XV in Monaco...  

The pinots noirs of David Duband are regularly cited in the press. His choices in regards to both viticulture and vinification have made him particularly successful. The Revue des Vins de France, in June 2012 cites the Clos de la Roche 2011 as having"inviting perfumes that evoke the traditional rose. A wine that emphasizes refinement rather than power, and in June 2013 citing the Chambolle-Musigny  1er Cru Clos Sorbé 2012 as : "A great wine, transcendental pinot noir, chiseled and refined.


 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir produces some of the world's most expensive, most lauded, rarest and delicious wines. Equally it is one of the most difficult grapes to grow successfully and as a result it is quite hard to make a balanced Pinot Noir. It is historically from Burgundy, most specifically in the Cote de Nuits, so much so that people will refer to Pinot Noir as a 'Burgundy'.

 

--------THE REGION--------

Burgundy

Burgundy is one of the most important wine regions in the world. It is often the one region that winemakers not lucky enough to be based there strive to make wine in. Run over to your local winery and I am sure that you'll find at least one Burgundy-phile. It is the historical home of the two major grapes: Pinot Noir and Chardonnay. 

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.