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Tamdhu 12YO

$100.00
Sale price

Regular price $100.00

The Tamdhu 12 Year Old replaced the Tamdhu 10 Year Old towards the end of 2018. With the replacement came an increase from 40% to 43% ABV – a good choice.

It has been matured in a combination of first-fill and refill Oloroso sherry casks, but it comes with a light (natural) colour.

Nose: Orange peel, nuts and caramel, hints of liquorice and vanilla. A kind of rubbery sweetness and slightly musty oak. A minty edge.

Mouth: Quite malty, with the sherry playing second violin. Raisins and baked apple. Bananas flambéed. Orangettes, cinnamon and almonds. The oak pushes through after a while, with clove and a slight pleasant bitterness.

Finish: medium, on raisins and vanilla with oak spice.

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Tamdhu

Situated at the village of Knockando in Speyside, the Tamdhu distillery makes a soft and very approachable dram.
History:
In 1897, a group of like-minded entrepreneurs came together with a shared ambition to create the best whisky in the world. No mean feat. They raised today’s equivalent of £20 million and began to make their vision a reality.
From the very first moments, everyone involved in Tamdhu had the same mind-set – only the best will do. And so it began. The best distillery architect and engineer of the day, Charles C Doig ESQ, was enlisted. The best location by the banks of the River Spey was acquired. The most advanced techniques were chosen. And the best sherry casks from Spain were selected. The stage was set.
In 1949, we began to modernise the original floor maltings and took the innovative decision to introduce Saladin boxes, a French invention that mechanises the barley turning process. No more 'monkey shoulder' for our distillery workers. As production in the distillery steadily increased over the next 15 years, it became necessary to increase the maltings output. At one stage, an impressive 10 Saladin boxes were required.
The popularity of whisky reached record highs in the 1970s and Tamdhu expanded further to meet the growing demand. Four stills were added in as many years, allowing the distillery to increase production considerably without compromising the exceptional quality of our spirit.
However in 2010, outside pressures forced the distillery to close its doors.
In January of 2012, the determination of Ian Macleod Distillers saw the Tamdhu Distillery doors open once more. Inspired by the founders’ commitment to creating the very best whisky, the family enterprise wanted to build upon the impressive Tamdhu legacy. Ian Macleod Distillers returned the distillery to its former glory, using the same processes and passion for sherry maturation as the founders had before them. Today, Tamdhu is proud to exclusively mature in the finest sherry oak casks. Nothing less.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

The Tamdhu 12 Year Old replaced the Tamdhu 10 Year Old towards the end of 2018. With the replacement came an increase from 40% to 43% ABV – a good choice.

It has been matured in a combination of first-fill and refill Oloroso sherry casks, but it comes with a light (natural) colour.

Nose: Orange peel, nuts and caramel, hints of liquorice and vanilla. A kind of rubbery sweetness and slightly musty oak. A minty edge.

Mouth: Quite malty, with the sherry playing second violin. Raisins and baked apple. Bananas flambéed. Orangettes, cinnamon and almonds. The oak pushes through after a while, with clove and a slight pleasant bitterness.

Finish: medium, on raisins and vanilla with oak spice.

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Tamdhu

Situated at the village of Knockando in Speyside, the Tamdhu distillery makes a soft and very approachable dram.
History:
In 1897, a group of like-minded entrepreneurs came together with a shared ambition to create the best whisky in the world. No mean feat. They raised today’s equivalent of £20 million and began to make their vision a reality.
From the very first moments, everyone involved in Tamdhu had the same mind-set – only the best will do. And so it began. The best distillery architect and engineer of the day, Charles C Doig ESQ, was enlisted. The best location by the banks of the River Spey was acquired. The most advanced techniques were chosen. And the best sherry casks from Spain were selected. The stage was set.
In 1949, we began to modernise the original floor maltings and took the innovative decision to introduce Saladin boxes, a French invention that mechanises the barley turning process. No more 'monkey shoulder' for our distillery workers. As production in the distillery steadily increased over the next 15 years, it became necessary to increase the maltings output. At one stage, an impressive 10 Saladin boxes were required.
The popularity of whisky reached record highs in the 1970s and Tamdhu expanded further to meet the growing demand. Four stills were added in as many years, allowing the distillery to increase production considerably without compromising the exceptional quality of our spirit.
However in 2010, outside pressures forced the distillery to close its doors.
In January of 2012, the determination of Ian Macleod Distillers saw the Tamdhu Distillery doors open once more. Inspired by the founders’ commitment to creating the very best whisky, the family enterprise wanted to build upon the impressive Tamdhu legacy. Ian Macleod Distillers returned the distillery to its former glory, using the same processes and passion for sherry maturation as the founders had before them. Today, Tamdhu is proud to exclusively mature in the finest sherry oak casks. Nothing less.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.