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East Imperial - Old World Tonic 4x150ml Pack

$10.00
Sale price

Regular price $10.00

As was the case with original Indian tonic water, East Imperial is now the only tonic water sourcing all the key ingredients from Asia. This is the champagne of tonic waters. This is not a soft drink. 

This is an authentic representation of what tonic water used to be at the turn of the last century before overly sweet tonics became the norm. Unlike other ‘diet’ tonics, we only use all-natural ingredients with no artificial colours or preservatives, and it is gluten-free. With only 30 Calories per serve (7.5gm of natural cane sugar) our Old World Tonic is the perfect way to enjoy your G&T without the guilt of calories. 

Upgrade your tonic to the authentic choice, and discover a new perspective on the wonderful world of premium gin.

TASTING NOTES:

The initial palate is warm with liquorice spice and fresh lavender with a hint of tea, finishing with a luxurious citrus mouth feel.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

East Imperial

Back in 1825, British Army officers stationed in India combined quinine, sugar and water in an attempt to create a daily tonic to act as a malaria prophylaxis. Gin was later added to the mix to mask the strong and bitter taste of the quinine water.

192 years on, the quintessential gin and tonic has come a very long way. But not necessarily in a good way. The overly sweet citric acid soft drinks of our time have replaced genuine, traditional tonic water. These modern drinks completely mask the herbaceous aromas of premium gin and other spirits, manipulating the role that tonic water now plays in modern mixology.

Thankfully, the East Imperial collection is here and true to the tradition.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir. 

As was the case with original Indian tonic water, East Imperial is now the only tonic water sourcing all the key ingredients from Asia. This is the champagne of tonic waters. This is not a soft drink. 

This is an authentic representation of what tonic water used to be at the turn of the last century before overly sweet tonics became the norm. Unlike other ‘diet’ tonics, we only use all-natural ingredients with no artificial colours or preservatives, and it is gluten-free. With only 30 Calories per serve (7.5gm of natural cane sugar) our Old World Tonic is the perfect way to enjoy your G&T without the guilt of calories. 

Upgrade your tonic to the authentic choice, and discover a new perspective on the wonderful world of premium gin.

TASTING NOTES:

The initial palate is warm with liquorice spice and fresh lavender with a hint of tea, finishing with a luxurious citrus mouth feel.

--------THE PRODUCER--------

East Imperial

Back in 1825, British Army officers stationed in India combined quinine, sugar and water in an attempt to create a daily tonic to act as a malaria prophylaxis. Gin was later added to the mix to mask the strong and bitter taste of the quinine water.

192 years on, the quintessential gin and tonic has come a very long way. But not necessarily in a good way. The overly sweet citric acid soft drinks of our time have replaced genuine, traditional tonic water. These modern drinks completely mask the herbaceous aromas of premium gin and other spirits, manipulating the role that tonic water now plays in modern mixology.

Thankfully, the East Imperial collection is here and true to the tradition.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not lean with high acid.  Rather choose wines with some sweetness, fruit or viscosity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not big tannins but have lots of fruity flavours.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami-rich foods.  They will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are fruity and/or have higher sweetness levels.

Wines that are off-dry like many Gewürztraminers or Rieslings could work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you could consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help to cut down the perception of fattiness.  

These suggestions (there are no rules that apply to everyone) will help you to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that works well by cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity in a Pinot Noir.