Pipoli - 'Zero' Aglianico del Vulture 2018

$30.00
Sale price

Regular price $30.00

"IDEA OF WINE: Wine made for drinkers that are seeking natural products without the chemical substance know as “sulphur dioxide.”

VINIFICATION: Soft crushing and de-stemming, fermentation with natural yeasts and without adding sulphur dioxide. Maceration for 40 days on skins, in order to keep all the polyphenols, good for the natural protection of the wine from oxidation due to the lack of SO².

COLOUR: Bright Red

NOSE: An intense and complex perfume with hints of red berries and notes of vanilla.

TASTE:  The tannins are light at first, and then they become stronger and silky, clean and dry ending.

RECOMMENDED WITH: Best served with good strong-flavoured first courses, roasted meat, red meat and game."

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Vigneti del Vulture

Location: Acerenza, Province of Potenza, Basilicata, Italy

Vigneti del Vulture was founded in 2009 in Acerenza, Basilicata, by the Farnese Group. The winery was founded with the intent to showcase Basilicata’s native varietals, namely Aglianico, Greco, and Fiano, and bring them to the international market.

 

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Aglianico

Aglianico is a red grape variety that is known best in the sub-regions of Taurasi and Aglianico del Vulture in Campania and Basilicata of southern Italy. Here it produces full-bodied savoury red wines. These wines can be quite high in tannin and are often best with a few years of age. 


 

--------THE REGION--------

Basilicata

Basilicata is a region of Italy that is the central south. The most famous aspect of Basilicata is that it is the most mountainous region in all of Italy. The pinnacle of this is on Mount Vulture - an dormant volcano. There are solely reds produced in this region and the most famous of which are made from Aglianico.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

"IDEA OF WINE: Wine made for drinkers that are seeking natural products without the chemical substance know as “sulphur dioxide.”

VINIFICATION: Soft crushing and de-stemming, fermentation with natural yeasts and without adding sulphur dioxide. Maceration for 40 days on skins, in order to keep all the polyphenols, good for the natural protection of the wine from oxidation due to the lack of SO².

COLOUR: Bright Red

NOSE: An intense and complex perfume with hints of red berries and notes of vanilla.

TASTE:  The tannins are light at first, and then they become stronger and silky, clean and dry ending.

RECOMMENDED WITH: Best served with good strong-flavoured first courses, roasted meat, red meat and game."

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Vigneti del Vulture

Location: Acerenza, Province of Potenza, Basilicata, Italy

Vigneti del Vulture was founded in 2009 in Acerenza, Basilicata, by the Farnese Group. The winery was founded with the intent to showcase Basilicata’s native varietals, namely Aglianico, Greco, and Fiano, and bring them to the international market.

 

 

--------THE GRAPE--------

Aglianico

Aglianico is a red grape variety that is known best in the sub-regions of Taurasi and Aglianico del Vulture in Campania and Basilicata of southern Italy. Here it produces full-bodied savoury red wines. These wines can be quite high in tannin and are often best with a few years of age. 


 

--------THE REGION--------

Basilicata

Basilicata is a region of Italy that is the central south. The most famous aspect of Basilicata is that it is the most mountainous region in all of Italy. The pinnacle of this is on Mount Vulture - an dormant volcano. There are solely reds produced in this region and the most famous of which are made from Aglianico.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.