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ink Dry Gin - Floral Infused 700ml

$90.00
Sale price

Regular price $90.00

Ink Gin™ is a premium dry gin made with 13 organic botanicals, including a mix of traditional and Australian natives. Like all true gins, juniper berries are the largest botanical component, however the defining character of Ink Gin comes from the second tier botanicals led by locally grown lemon myrtle leaf, coriander seed, Tasmanian pepper berry and freshly peeled sundried sweet orange peel. These major ingredients give Ink Gin its fresh piney, spicy and citrusy aroma and flavour. The third group of minor botanicals include elderflower, cinnamon, cardamom, angelica root, oris root, licorice root and lemon peel. Like a pinch of salt, these minor ingredients are critical to the end result adding perfume, body and balance.

The final ingredient is added in a post-distillation infusion. The specially prepared petals of the butterfly pea flower are steeped in the still for twenty-four hours to give Ink Gin its distinctive colour.

Now for the scientific part. Remember high school chemistry?

Butterfly pea flowers are highly sensitive to pH. When the floral-infused Ink Gin is mixed with something of low pH (including gin's best friends; tonic water, lime or lemon), the colour changes dramatically from blue to blush pink. Not magic – just science.

As well as contributing to Ink’s curious colour-changing properties, the delicate obscuration of the floral ink makes for smooth drinking. The flower’s subtle astringency leaves the palate crisp and clean, allowing the citrus and floral notes of the major botanicals a long, refreshing finish. Have fun experimenting with Ink Gin in your favourite cocktails, or drink neat or over ice.

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Husk Distillers

Inspired by the diverse and vibrant rum culture of the Caribbean islands and a yearning for fine Australian spirits, distiller Paul Messenger, along with his wife Mandy and daughters Harriet, Edwina & Claudia, embarked on a journey to create a plantation distillery on their cattle & cane farm, nestled in the green caldera surrounding Mt Warning in Northern NSW.

Our vision was to create a premium, paddock to bottle agricole rum with a unique Australian expression. Our journey is now in it's eighth year. We’ve had to develop new skills and adapt new methods of small-scale cultivation, harvesting and crushing not used in the area before. We’ve designed our distillery based on fermentation, distillation and maturation methods not typically used in commercial rum distilleries and the result is a rum that we are proud to say has the unique characteristics of our part of the world - our provenance.

Husk Rum can only be made from freshly crushed cane juice so its production is restricted to the harvest season from August to November. While rum from our first harvest in 2012 was quietly maturing on oak we began creating a gin, something different that would challenge people’s perception of what gin can be.

Ink Gin was a bold risk which paid off, as people around the country fell in love with the colour play & soft Australiana taste. We quickly outgrew our tiny farm shed distillery, and in late 2016 we started building a new distillery, which would be complete with a cellar door, bar and barrel house.

In April 2017 we faced our biggest challenge to date, as the most devastating flood in 100 years ripped through the Tweed Valley, an aftermath of cyclone Debbie. With 4 metres of water blanketing our farm, and 1 metre of water through our barrel shed and distillery, it was a major setback and put construction on hold for several months as our region dealt with the clean up. 

2019 saw us finally complete our new distillery after a long 2.5 years of construction. This is complete with a cellar door and cafe, and is now open to the public for tours and tastings. We can't wait to welcome you to our farm for a visit.

Follow our journey as we continue to develop experimental blends and innovative craft spirits.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir. 

Ink Gin™ is a premium dry gin made with 13 organic botanicals, including a mix of traditional and Australian natives. Like all true gins, juniper berries are the largest botanical component, however the defining character of Ink Gin comes from the second tier botanicals led by locally grown lemon myrtle leaf, coriander seed, Tasmanian pepper berry and freshly peeled sundried sweet orange peel. These major ingredients give Ink Gin its fresh piney, spicy and citrusy aroma and flavour. The third group of minor botanicals include elderflower, cinnamon, cardamom, angelica root, oris root, licorice root and lemon peel. Like a pinch of salt, these minor ingredients are critical to the end result adding perfume, body and balance.

The final ingredient is added in a post-distillation infusion. The specially prepared petals of the butterfly pea flower are steeped in the still for twenty-four hours to give Ink Gin its distinctive colour.

Now for the scientific part. Remember high school chemistry?

Butterfly pea flowers are highly sensitive to pH. When the floral-infused Ink Gin is mixed with something of low pH (including gin's best friends; tonic water, lime or lemon), the colour changes dramatically from blue to blush pink. Not magic – just science.

As well as contributing to Ink’s curious colour-changing properties, the delicate obscuration of the floral ink makes for smooth drinking. The flower’s subtle astringency leaves the palate crisp and clean, allowing the citrus and floral notes of the major botanicals a long, refreshing finish. Have fun experimenting with Ink Gin in your favourite cocktails, or drink neat or over ice.

 

--------THE PRODUCER--------

Husk Distillers

Inspired by the diverse and vibrant rum culture of the Caribbean islands and a yearning for fine Australian spirits, distiller Paul Messenger, along with his wife Mandy and daughters Harriet, Edwina & Claudia, embarked on a journey to create a plantation distillery on their cattle & cane farm, nestled in the green caldera surrounding Mt Warning in Northern NSW.

Our vision was to create a premium, paddock to bottle agricole rum with a unique Australian expression. Our journey is now in it's eighth year. We’ve had to develop new skills and adapt new methods of small-scale cultivation, harvesting and crushing not used in the area before. We’ve designed our distillery based on fermentation, distillation and maturation methods not typically used in commercial rum distilleries and the result is a rum that we are proud to say has the unique characteristics of our part of the world - our provenance.

Husk Rum can only be made from freshly crushed cane juice so its production is restricted to the harvest season from August to November. While rum from our first harvest in 2012 was quietly maturing on oak we began creating a gin, something different that would challenge people’s perception of what gin can be.

Ink Gin was a bold risk which paid off, as people around the country fell in love with the colour play & soft Australiana taste. We quickly outgrew our tiny farm shed distillery, and in late 2016 we started building a new distillery, which would be complete with a cellar door, bar and barrel house.

In April 2017 we faced our biggest challenge to date, as the most devastating flood in 100 years ripped through the Tweed Valley, an aftermath of cyclone Debbie. With 4 metres of water blanketing our farm, and 1 metre of water through our barrel shed and distillery, it was a major setback and put construction on hold for several months as our region dealt with the clean up. 

2019 saw us finally complete our new distillery after a long 2.5 years of construction. This is complete with a cellar door and cafe, and is now open to the public for tours and tastings. We can't wait to welcome you to our farm for a visit.

Follow our journey as we continue to develop experimental blends and innovative craft spirits.

The best place to start when you are pairing food and wine is to think about the structural elements of both the food and wines. These elements are: sweetness, acidity, bitterness, umami, chilli heat and fat.

We have listed these elements in foods and how you can add wines with similar or contrasting elements to help create harmony in your matches.

Sweetness 

Sweet foods can overpower dry wines, white or red, making them appear acidic, neutral or bitter. In order to reduce this effect you should pair sweet foods with sweet wines. 

Acidity

Acidic foods, like fresh citrus, tomatoes or salads laden with vinaigrettes, will overpower the acidity in a wine making them appear flabby or less acidic than they were. In order to reduce this effect you should pair acidic foods with wines that have a higher acidity such as Champagne, Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc.

Acidity is a key element in creating balance in a dish or a food-and-wine match. If the foods are going to reduce the acidity in the wines then you need to add your own bit of acidity by bringing a more acidic wine to the table. It is the same principle behind adding lemon juice to seafood dishes, as seafood tends to have quite low natural acidity.

Bitterness

If a food is high in bitterness then it will make the wine appear bitter, or it will increase the perception of bitterness (tannins) in the wine. In order to reduce this effect you should pair bitter foods with wines that are not bitter but rather have refreshing acidity.

Umami (Savoury)

Foods that are highly savoury, like mushrooms, will increase the bitterness or acidic perception we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair umami rich foods with wines that are very fruity and do not have medium-high tannins. 

Often foods that are more savoury are best matched with white wines like Chardonnay or Soave as these do not have tannins but have lots of fruity flavours nor do they have extremely high acidity.

Chilli Heat

Chilli heat is similar to umami rich foods where by it will increase the bitterness or acidic perception as well as the alcoholic burn we have in wines. In order to reduce this effect you should pair chilli heat rich foods with wines that are very fruity but also have higher sweetness.

Wines that are just a touch off-dry like many Gewurztraminer or Riesling work best with chilli foods like a curry as they will be both a bit sweet but also very fruity. If you aren't a white wine drinker then you should consider red wines that have lower tannins such as a Pinot Noir or a Gamay Noir. 

Fatty

Foods that are high in fat will make the wines feel flabby and less fruity. In order to reduce this effect you should pair fatty foods with wines that have high acidity. This is similar to the rule of adding in acidity (in the form of citrus) to seafood to help balance out not just the acidity but to cut down the perception of fattiness in the seafood. 

This is why when you are having a piece of red meat that is high in fat, like lamb, then you should pair it with a Pinot Noir instead of a Merlot as a Pinot Noir will have a higher acidity and will help to balance out the dish.

 

 

These rules will help you with starting to think about how to create pairings. It often isn't helpful to think about 'red wine and red meat' or 'white wine and fish' because it is actually the structural elements of the wine and food that are what need to be balanced. It is the acidity in white wines that work well with cutting through the fattiness of a piece of fish but you could get that acidity through a Pinot Noir.